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Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges by Amy Cuddy
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Presence Quotes Showing 1-30 of 99
“preparation is obviously important, but at some point, you must stop preparing content and start preparing mind-set. You have to shift from what you’ll say to how you’ll say it.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“focus less on the impression you’re making on others and more on the impression you’re making on yourself.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“A truly confident person does not require arrogance, which is nothing more than a smoke screen for insecurity.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“A confident person — knowing and believing in her identity — carries tools, not weapons.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“This is how self-fulfilling prophecies work: we have an expectation about who someone is and how she’s likely to behave, then we treat her in a way that is likely to elicit those behaviors, thus confirming our initial expectations… and so on.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“Powerful people initiate speech more often, talk more overall, and make more eye contact while they’re speaking than powerless people do. When we feel powerful, we speak more slowly and take more time. We don’t rush. We’re not afraid to pause. We feel entitled to the time we’re using.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“We convince by our presence,” and to convince others we need to convince ourselves.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“All changes… have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“When we meet someone new, we quickly answer two questions: “Can I trust this person?” and “Can I respect this person?” In our research, my colleagues and I have referred to these dimensions as warmth and competence respectively. Usually we think that a person we’ve just met is either more warm than competent or more competent than warm, but not both in equal measure. We like our distinctions to be clear—it’s a human bias. So we classify new acquaintances into types. Tiziana Casciaro, in her research into organizations, refers to these types as lovable fools or competent jerks.2 Occasionally we see people as incompetent and cold—foolish jerks—or as warm and competent—lovable stars. The latter is the golden quadrant, because receiving trust and respect from other people allows you to interact well and get things done. But we don’t value the two traits equally. First we judge warmth or trustworthiness, which we consider to be the more important of the two dimensions. Oscar Ybarra and his colleagues found, for instance, that people process words related to warmth and morality (friendly, honest, and others) faster than words related to competence (creative, skillful, and others).3 Why do we prioritize warmth over competence? Because from an evolutionary perspective, it is more crucial to our survival to know whether a person deserves our trust. If he doesn’t, we’d better keep our distance, because he’s potentially dangerous, especially if he’s competent. We do value people who are capable, especially in circumstances where that trait is necessary, but we only notice that after we’ve judged their trustworthiness. Recalling”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“You never figure out how to write a novel; you just learn how to write the novel that you’re on.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“When people lie, they are juggling multiple narratives: what they know to be true, what they want to be true, what they are presenting as true, and all the emotions that go along with each—fear, anger, guilt, hope. All the while, they are trying to project a credible image of themselves, which suddenly becomes very, very difficult. Their beliefs and feelings are in conflict with themselves and each other.29 Managing all this conflict—conscious and unconscious, psychological and physiological—removes people from the moment.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“I am larger, better than I thought, I did not know I held so much goodness.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“Entrepreneurs’ grounded enthusiasm is contagious, stimulating a high level of commitment, confidence, passion, and performance in the people who work for and with them.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“When our body language is confident and open, other people respond in kind, unconsciously reinforcing not only their perception of us but also our perception of ourselves.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“the strongest predictor of who got the money was not the person’s credentials or the content of the pitch. The strongest predictors of who got the money were these traits: confidence, comfort level, and passionate enthusiasm.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“Presence emerges when we feel personally powerful, which allows us to be acutely attuned to our most sincere selves.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“Ultimately, the only power to which man should aspire is that which he exercises over himself.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“All changes have their melancholy”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“Impostorism causes us to overthink and second-guess. It makes us fixate on how we think others are judging us (in these fixations, we’re usually wrong), then fixate some more on how those judgments might poison our interactions. We’re scattered—worrying that we underprepared, obsessing about what we should be doing, mentally reviewing what we said five seconds earlier, fretting about what people think of us and what that will mean for us tomorrow.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“After meticulously analyzing videos of 185 venture capital presentations — looking at both verbal and nonverbal behavior — Lakshmi ended up with results that surprised her: the strongest predictor of who got the money was not the person’s credentials or the content of the pitch. The strongest predictors of who got the money were these traits: confidence, comfort level, and passionate enthusiasm.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“The way you carry yourself is a source of personal power—the kind of power that is the key to presence. It’s the key that allows you to unlock yourself—your abilities, your creativity, your courage, and even your generosity. It doesn’t give you skills or talents you don’t have; it helps you to share the ones you do have. It doesn’t make you smarter or better informed; it makes you more resilient and open. It doesn’t change who you are; it allows you to be who you are.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“Movement, like posture, tells the brain how it feels and even manages what it remembers. As walking becomes more open, upright, and buoyant, our memories about ourselves follow suit.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“We don’t rush our words. We’re not afraid to pause. We feel deserving of the time we’re using. We even make more direct eye contact while we’re speaking.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“Power… transforms individual psychology such that the powerful think and act in ways that lead to the retention and acquisition of power,”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“Begin to be now what you will be hereafter.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“trust is the conduit of influence, and the only way to establish real trust is by being present.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“In a sense, speaking in an unhurried way allows us time to communicate clearly, without runaway social anxieties inhibiting us from presenting our true selves.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“Expanding your body language—through posture, movement, and speech—makes you feel more confident and powerful, less anxious and self-absorbed, and generally more positive.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“If you’re protecting yourself against harm—emotional harm or humiliation—you can’t be present, because you’re too protected.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
“He speaks in a deep, calm, resonant voice. He is honest and humble yet confident and strong. He never rushes. He does not fear pauses, and because he doesn’t fear them, neither do we. That’s how presence begets presence.”
Amy Cuddy, Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges

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