Holacracy Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World by Brian J. Robertson
821 ratings, 3.68 average rating, 84 reviews
Open Preview
Holacracy Quotes Showing 1-27 of 27
“Holacracy includes the following elements: • a constitution, which sets out the “rules of the game” and redistributes authority • a new way to structure an organization and define people’s roles and spheres of authority within it • a unique decision-making process for updating those roles and authorities • a meeting process for keeping teams in sync and getting work done together”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“There is no freedom without discipline, no vision without a form”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The Revolutionary Management System that Abolishes Hierarchy
“Consensus didn’t accomplish that. In fact, all it resulted in was long painful meetings where we would try to force everyone to see things the same way. That isn’t helpful or healthy, and it only gets worse as an organization grows.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“people have lots of ideas about what “we” should do … but “we” doesn’t do it”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“Holacracy obsoletes the habit of making commitments about when you will deliver a particular project or action. In tactical meetings, for example, we capture next-actions, but do not attach deadline commitments to them. Why? As much as the practice of setting deadlines is generally recommended in today’s business world, allow me to offer a contrary view: committing to deadlines has important downsides, and using them obscures a more dynamic, reality-based approach.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“Sometimes the conflicts we have in organizational life are actually clashes of the roles involved, but we mistake them for clashes between the people filling those roles.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“Dynamic steering means constant adjustment in light of real feedback,”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The Revolutionary Management System that Abolishes Hierarchy
“This is the shift at the heart of Holacracy: the recognition that when the core authority structure and processes of an organization fundamentally hold space for everyone to have and use power, and do not allow anyone—even”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“The more forward-thinking leaders in contemporary corporate culture are all too aware of the problems with the top-down, predict-and-control paradigm. They see its limitations and feel its unhealthy consequences.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“Holacracy is not a governance process “of the people, by the people, for the people”—it’s governance of the organization, through the people, for the purpose.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“On a human level, regular governance meetings can transform the emotional tone of a team. Unclear governance leaves everyone with implicit expectations of who should be doing what and how they should be doing it. Without a defined governance process, it’s easy to make up negative stories about others or toss around blame when unspoken assumptions clash—or to avoid those problems by pressuring people to align with implicit expectations, often through political cajoling or consensus building.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“Research shows that every time the size of a city doubles, innovation or productivity per resident increases by 15 percent. But when companies get bigger, innovation or productivity per employee generally goes down.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“Too often, corporate strategy is built on the misguided notion that we can reliably predict the future. Nassim Nicholas Taleb, one of the most cogent writers on the illusion of predictability, has said, “We cannot truly plan, because we do not understand the future—but this is not necessarily bad news. We could plan while bearing in mind such limitations. It just takes guts.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“When we attempt to predict the future in an unpredictable world, not only are we deluding ourselves, but worse we are actually inhibiting our ability to sense and respond to reality in the present moment. When you impose a “should”—as in “I should be X in five years’ time”—you create an attachment to that outcome; the attachment limits your ability to sense when reality is not going in that direction, or when other possible opportunities arise that might conflict with what you first set out to achieve.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“What is Holacracy? Essentially, it’s a new social technology for governing and operating an organization, defined by a set of core rules distinctly different from those of a conventionally governed organization.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“In an urban environment, people share space and resources locally, understanding territorial boundaries and responsibilities. Of course, there are laws and governing bodies to define and enforce those laws, but people don’t have bosses ordering them around all the time. If the residents of our cities had to wait for authorization from the boss for every decision they made, the city would quickly grind to a halt. Yet in our companies we see a very different organizing principle at play.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“Decisions need to be made and expectations set, one way or another, and social norms will develop around how those functions are carried out. Organizations that attempt to forgo an explicit power structure thus end up with an implicit one, which is often quite political and somewhat resistant to change.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“evolution is the most intelligent designer around.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“How can we reshape a company into an evolutionary organism—one that can sense and adapt and learn and integrate?”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“Slow down to speed up.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The Revolutionary Management System that Abolishes Hierarchy
“Give someone monarch-like authority, and sooner or later there will be a royal screw-up.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The Revolutionary Management System that Abolishes Hierarchy
“This is also what intrigued Zappos’ Hsieh about Holacracy: its promise of a safe and practical way to distribute real power and therefore allow for self-organization, through a constitutionally defined governance process. After our initial encounter, Hsieh invited me to meet his team and decided to pilot Holacracy in a small department within his organization. The pilot was successful enough that in 2013 he went on to roll out Holacracy throughout his company. I was thrilled—and just a little apprehensive. This would be by far our biggest adoption yet. How would Holacracy work at the scale of a fifteen-hundred-employee company? Would it create the self-organizing, citylike collaborative environment that Hsieh was looking for? I knew it had the potential to do exactly that in smaller organizations, so I was eager to see it play out on this bigger stage.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“under the Holacracy constitution, someone who accepts a role assignment also takes on certain explicit responsibilities. These include: • Sensing and processing tensions around the role’s purpose and accountabilities, through the various channels available • Processing accountabilities: regularly identifying specific next-actions you could take and defining projects you could work toward to fulfill the role’s accountabilities • Processing projects: regularly identifying next-actions that would move each of the role’s projects forward • Tracking projects and next-actions: capturing all of the role’s projects and next-actions in a database or tangible form accessible to others, outside your own mind • Directing attention and resources: consciously and continually choosing the next-action or other activity that it makes most sense to direct your attention and resources toward, all things considered, and then taking that action.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“This can be a little uncomfortable at first. Shereef Bishay, the founder of the educational company Dev Bootcamp, put it succinctly: “The explicitness that Holacracy creates is uncivilized.” Bishay was pointing to how accustomed we can get, in “civilized” society, to being vague and indirect. When things get really clear and concrete, it can feel awkward at first. But as clarity grows, trust is often a natural outcome. Over time, the organizational culture becomes more and more free of people using politics as a means of influence, simply because generating clarity through governance is more effective.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“As Brian indicates, Holacracy is not a panacea: it won’t resolve all of an organization’s tensions and dilemmas. But, in my experience, it does provide the most stable ground from which to recognize, frame, and address them.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“Everything is vague to a degree you do not realize till you have tried to make it precise. —BERTRAND RUSSELL, The Philosophy of Logical Atomism”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World
“With Holacracy, no single person designs the organization, and no single group sits down and designs the organization. Rather, an organization’s design is an emergent result of an evolutionary algorithm—and that’s a good thing, because when it comes to finding fit designs, evolution is much smarter than we are.”
Brian J. Robertson, Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World