Prayer Quotes

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Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God by Timothy J. Keller
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Prayer Quotes Showing 271-300 of 322
“Though prayer is a kind of artillery that changes the circumstances of the world, it is as much or even more about changing our own understanding and attitude toward those circumstances. Prayer is “a kinde of tune” that transposes even “the six daies world.” The six days is not the Sabbath day of formal worship but the workweek of ordinary life. Yet the one “houre” of prayer completely transposes it all, as the transposition of a piece of music changes its key, tone, and timbre.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“Then you sit down to pray and the reorientation that comes before God’s face reveals the pettiness of your feelings in an instant.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“Knowing God is a matter of personal dealing. . . . Knowing God is more than knowing about him; it is a matter of dealing with him as he opens up to you, and being dealt with by him. . . . Friends . . . open their hearts to each other by what they say and do. . . . We must not lose sight of the fact that knowing God is an emotional relationship, as well as an intellectual and volitional one, and could not indeed be a deep relationship between persons if it were not so.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“Prayer , then, is both awe and intimacy, struggle and reality. These will not happen every time we pray, but each should be a major component of our prayer over the course of our lives.”
Timothy J. Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“Again we see prayer is simply a recognition of the greatness of God.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“into the presence of a Person. Something expectant, patient, inexorable, met her with no veil or protection between.” God met her. As a result, everything changed. “The mould under the bushes, the moss on the path, and the little brick border were not visibly changed. But they were changed. A boundary had been crossed.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“if you love anything at all in this world more than God, you will crush that object under the weight of your expectations, and it will eventually break your heart.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“The Bible speaks of our relationship with God as knowing and being known (Gal 4:9; 1 Cor 13:12).”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“we were called to an intelligent mysticism.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“When we look at Jesus Christ as he is shown to us in the Scriptures, we are looking at the glory of God through the filter of a human nature.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“If Christians do not base their lives on God’s steadfast love, then they will have “to accept as success what others warrant to be so, and to take their happiness, even their own selves, at the quotation of the day. They tremble, with reason, before their fate.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“When life is going smoothly, and our truest heart treasures seem safe, it does not occur to us to pray.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“To fail to pray, then, is not to merely break some religious rule—it is a failure to treat God as God. It is a sin against his glory. “Far be it from me,” said the prophet Samuel to his people, “that I should sin against the Lord by failing to pray for you”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“Gratitude exclaims . . . ‘How good of God to give me this.’ Adoration says, ‘What must be the quality of that Being whose far-off and momentary coruscations are like this!’ One’s mind runs back up the sunbeam to the sun.”312 He learns to instinctively think “What kind of God would create this, give me this?” He concludes that while he doesn’t succeed in always keeping this discipline, it has enriched both his joy in everyday life and his concentrated times of prayer. He says we “shall not be able to adore God on the highest occasions if we have learned no habit of doing so on the lowest.”313”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“We must not decide how to pray based on what types of prayer are the most effective for producing the experiences and feelings we want. We pray in response to God himself. God’s Word to us contains this range of discourse—and only if we respond to his Word will our own prayer life be as rich and varied.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“One of the most striking things John Calvin says about prayer is that it is the main way we receive everything there is for us in Christ: “It remains for us to seek in him, and in prayers to ask of him, what we have learned to be in him.”253 Think about it. We cannot receive Christ and believe on his name (John 1:12–13) except through prayer. Martin Luther wrote that “all of life is repentance” and that is how we grow in grace. But that again is prayer. Our “chief end,” says the Westminster Shorter Catechism, is “to glorify God and enjoy him forever.” All these things are, at their essence, prayer. At the end of time, history will culminate in a great banquet (Rev 19:9), but, as we have seen, we can eat with Jesus now. How? Through prayer. Commentators understand that Jesus’ invitation to “hear his voice” and “open the door” so he can “come in and eat with that person, and they with me” (Rev 3:20) is an invitation to fellowship and communion with him through prayer. Prayer—though it is often draining, even an agony—is in the long term the greatest source of power that is possible.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“Prayer is the only entryway into genuine self-knowledge. It is also the main way we experience deep change—the reordering of our loves.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“You are the slim crescent of a moon that I see and my self is the earth’s shadow that keeps me from seeing all the moon . . . what I am afraid of, dear God, is that my self shadow will grow so large that it blocks the whole moon, and that I will judge myself by the shadow that is nothing. I do not know You God because I am in the way.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“To see the law by Christ fulfilled And hear his pard’ning voice Transforms a slave into a child And duty into choice.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“Prayer is therefore not a strictly private thing. As much as we can, we should pray with others both formally in gathered worship and informally. Why? If the substance of prayer is to continue a conversation with God, and if the purpose of it is to know God better, then this can happen best in community. C. S. Lewis argues that it takes a community of people to get to know an individual person. Reflecting on his own friendships, he observed that some aspects of one of his friend’s personality were brought out only through interaction with a second friend. That meant if he lost the second friend, he lost the part of his first friend that was otherwise invisible. “By myself I am not large enough to call the whole man into activity; I want other lights than my own to show all his facets.”221 If it takes a community to know an ordinary human being, how much more necessary would it be to get to know Jesus alongside others? By praying with friends, you will be able to hear and see facets of Jesus that you have not yet perceived. That is why, Lewis thinks, that the angels in Isaiah 6 are crying, “Holy, Holy, Holy” to one another. Each angel is communicating to all the rest the part of the glory it sees. Knowing the Lord is communal and cumulative, we must pray and praise together. That way “the more we share the Heavenly Bread between us, the more we shall all have.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“We should not decide how to pray based on the experiences and feelings we want. Instead, we should do everything possible to behold our God as he is, and prayer will follow. The more clearly we grasp who God is, the more our prayer is shaped and determined accordingly.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“What is prayer, then, in the fullest sense? Prayer is continuing a conversation that God has started through his Word”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“When the Holy Spirit comes down on you in fullness, you can sense your Father’s arms beneath you. It is an assurance of who you are. The Spirit enables you to say to yourself: “If someone as all-powerful as that loves me like this, delights in me, has gone to infinite lengths to save me, says he will never let me go, and is going to glorify me and make me perfect and take everything bad out of my life—if all of that is true—why am I worried about anything?” At a minimum this means joy, and a lack of fear and self-consciousness.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“Without immersion in God’s words, our prayers may not be merely limited and shallow but also untethered from reality. We may be responding not to the real God but to what we wish God and life to be like. Indeed, if left to themselves our hearts will tend to create a God who doesn’t exist. People from Western cultures want a God who is loving and forgiving but not holy and transcendent. Studies of the spiritual lives of young adults in Western countries reveal that their prayers, therefore, are generally devoid of both repentance and of the joy of being forgiven.130 Without prayer that answers the God of the Bible, we will only be talking to ourselves.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“Yet Jesus is not simply a good example. If that were all he was to us, his life would crush us with guilt, since no one could meditate on the Scripture as he does. He is, thank God, infinitely more than that. He is not just an exemplar within Scripture, he is the one to whom all the Scripture points, because the main message of the Bible is salvation by grace through Jesus (Luke 24:27, 44). The Bible is all about him. Moses wrote of him, and Abraham rejoiced to see his day (John 5:46, 8:56). The written Word and its law can be a delight because the incarnate Word came and died for us, securing pardon for our sins and shortcomings before God’s law. You can’t delight in the law of the Lord without understanding Jesus’ whole mission. Without him, the law is nothing but a curse, a condemnation, a witness against us (Gal 3:10–11). He obeyed the law fully for us (2 Cor 5:21), so now it is a delight to us, not an everlasting despair.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“It is possible to merely assent that something is a sin without getting the new perspective on it and experiencing the new inward aversion to it that gives you the power and freedom to change. Put another way, there is a false kind of repentance”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“Richard Lovelace wrote: It is an item of faith that we are children of God; there is plenty of experience in us against it. The faith that surmounts this evidence and that is able to warm itself at the fire of God’s love, instead of having to steal love and self-acceptance from other sources, is actually the root of holiness. . . . We are not saved by the love we exercise, but by the love we trust.275”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“Prayer brings new perspective because it puts God back into the picture.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“If we want freedom from being driven by fear, ambition, greed, lust, addictions, and inner emptiness, we must learn how to meditate on Christ until his glory breaks in upon our souls.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
“God does not merely require our petitions but our selves, and no one who begins the hard, lifelong trek of prayer knows yet who they are.”
Timothy Keller, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God