The Enchanted April Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
The Enchanted April The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim
12,852 ratings, 3.96 average rating, 1,900 reviews
Open Preview
The Enchanted April Quotes Showing 1-30 of 54
“Beauty made you love, and love made you beautiful.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“... Why, it would really be being unselfish to go away and be happy for a little, because we would come back so much nicer.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“How they had dreamed together, he and she... how they had planned, and laughed, and loved. They had lived for a while in the very heart of poetry.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“I'm sure it's wrong to go on being good for too long, till one gets miserable. And I can see you've been good for years and years, because you look so unhappy.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“It is true she liked him most when he wasn't there, but then she usually liked everybody most when they weren't there.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“Now she had taken off her goodness and left it behind her like a heap of rain-sodden clothes, and she only felt joy.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“Reading was very important; the proper exercise and development of one's mind was a paramount duty.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“How passionately she longed to be important to somebody again - not important on platforms, not important as an asset in an organisation, but privately important, just to one other person, quite privately, nobody else to know or notice. It didn't seem much to ask in a world so crowded with people, just to have one of them, only one out of all the millions to oneself. Somebody who needed one, who thought of one, who was eager to come to one - oh, oh how dreadfully one wanted to be precious.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
tags: love
“Upon my word," thought Mrs. Fisher, "the way one pretty face can turn a delightful man into an idiot is past all patience.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“I wish,' said Rose anxiously, 'I understood you.'
'Don't try,' said Lotty, smiling.
'But I must, because I love you.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“In bed by herself: adorable condition.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“All down the stone steps on either side were periwinkles in full flower, and she could now see what it was that had caught at her the night before and brushed, wet and scented, across her face. It was wistaria. Wistaria and sunshine . . . she remembered the advertisement. Here indeed were both in profusion. The wistaria was tumbling over itself in its excess of life, its prodigality of flowering; and where the pergola ended the sun blazed on scarlet geraniums, bushes of them, and nasturtiums in great heaps, and marigolds so brilliant that they seemed to be burning, and red and pink snapdragons, all outdoing each other in bright, fierce colour. The ground behind these flaming things dropped away in terraces to the sea, each terrace a little orchard, where among the olives grew vines on trellises, and fig-trees, and peach-trees, and cherry-trees. The cherry-trees and peach-trees were in blossom--lovely showers of white and deep rose-colour among the trembling delicacy of the olives; the fig-leaves were just big enough to smell of figs, the vine-buds were only beginning to show. And beneath these trees were groups of blue and purple irises, and bushes of lavender, and grey, sharp cactuses, and the grass was thick with dandelions and daisies, and right down at the bottom was the sea. Colour seemed flung down anyhow, anywhere; every sort of colour piled up in heaps, pouring along in rivers....”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“Always being there was the essential secret for a wife.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“But there are no men here,” said Mrs. Wilkins, “so how can it be improper? Have you noticed,” she inquired of Mrs. Fisher, who endeavoured to pretend she did not hear, “How difficult it is to be improper without men?”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“He had no idea that he never went out of the house without her blessing going with him too, hovering, like a little echo of finished love, round that once dear head”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“She was having a violent reaction against beautiful clothes and the slavery they impose on one, her experience being that the instant one had got them they took one in hand and gave one no peace till they had been everywhere and been seen by everybody. You didn't take your clothes to parties; they took you. It was quite a mistake to think think that a woman, a really well-dressed woman wore out her clothes; it was the clothes that wore out the woman- dragging her about at all hours of the day and night.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“Worse than jokes in the morning did she hate the idea of a husband.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“The very feel of her hand, even through its glove, was reassuring; it was the sort of hand, he thought, that children would like to hold in the dark.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“She made him think of his mother, of his nurse, of all things kind and comforting, besides having the attraction of not being his mother or his nurse.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“Happy? Poor, ordinary, everyday word. But what could one say, how could one describe it? It was as though she could hardly stay inside herself, it was as though she were too small to hold so much of joy, it was as though she were washed through with light. And how astonishing to feel this sheer bliss, for here she was, not doing and not going to do a single unselfish thing, not going to do a thing she didn't want to do. ... Now she had taken off all her goodness and left it behind her like a heap in rain-sodden clothes, and she only felt joy.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“This was the simple happiness of complete harmony with her surroundings, the happiness that asks for nothing, that just accepts, just breathes, just is.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“Beauty made you love, love made you beautiful....

She pulled her wrap closer round her with a gesture of defence, of keeping out and off. She didn't want to grow sentimental. Difficult not to, here; the marvelous night stole in through all one's chinks, and brought in with it, whether one wanted them or not, enormous feelings--feelings one couldn't manage, great things about death and time and waste; glorious and devastating things, magnificent and bleak, at once rapture and terror and immense, heart-cleaving longing. She felt small and dreadfully alone. She felt uncovered and defenceless. Instinctively she pulled her wrap closer. With this thing of chiffon she tried to protect herself from the eternities.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“Nobody could have put her in the shade, blown out her light that evening; she was too evidently shining.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“What fun it had been, having an admirer even for that little while. No wonder people liked admirers. They seemed, in some strange way, to make one come alive.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“Mrs. Fisher had never cared for macaroni, especially not this long, worm-shaped variety. She found it difficult to eat--slippery, wriggling off her fork, making her look, she felt, undignified when, having got it as she supposed into her mouth, ends of it yet hung out. Always, too, when she ate it she was reminded of Mr. Fisher. He had during their married life behaved very much like macaroni. He had slipped, he had wriggled, he had made her feel undignified, and when at last she had got him safe, as she thought, there had invariably been little bits of him that still, as it were, hung out.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“Sternly she tried to frown the unseemly sensation down. Burgeon, indeed. She had heard of dried staffs, pieces of mere dead wood, suddenly putting forth fresh leaves, but only in legend. She was not in legend. She knew perfectly what was due to herself. Dignity demanded that she should have nothing to do with fresh leaves at her age; and yet there it was--the feeling that presently, that at any moment now, she might crop out all green.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“You mustn't long in heaven," said Mrs. Wilkins. "You're supposed to be quite complete there. And it is heaven, isn't it, Rose? See how everything has been let in together -- the dandelions and the irises, the vulgar and the superior, me and Mrs. Fisher -- all welcome, all mixed up anyhow, and all so visibly happy and enjoying ourselves.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“And there they were, arrived; and it was San Salvatore; and their suit-cases were waiting for them; and they had not been murdered.”
Elizabeth Von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“Steadfast as the points of the compass to Mrs. Arbuthnot were the great four facts of life: God, Husband, Home, Duty. She had gone to sleep on these facts years ago, after a period of much misery, her head resting on them as on a pillow; and she had a great dread of being awakened out of so simple and untroublesome a condition.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April
“In the eighties, when she chiefly flourished, husbands were taken seriously, as the only real obstacles to sin. Beds too, if they had to be mentioned, were approached with caution; and a decent reserve prevented them and husbands ever being spoken of in the same breath.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Enchanted April

« previous 1