Lovingkindness Quotes

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Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness by Sharon Salzberg
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Lovingkindness Quotes Showing 1-30 of 85
“Sometimes we think that to develop an open heart, to be truly loving and compassionate, means that we need to be passive, to allow others to abuse us, to smile and let anyone do what they want with us. Yet this is not what is meant by compassion. Quite the contrary. Compassion is not at all weak. It is the strength that arises out of seeing the true nature of suffering in the world. Compassion allows us to bear witness to that suffering, whether it is in ourselves or others, without fear; it allows us to name injustice without hesitation, and to act strongly, with all the skill at our disposal. To develop this mind state of compassion...is to learn to live, as the Buddha put it, with sympathy for all living beings, without exception.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“The difference between misery and happiness depends on what we do with our attention.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“Metta is the ability to embrace all parts of ourselves, as well as all parts of the world. Practicing metta illuminates our inner integrity because it relieves us of the need to deny different aspects of ourselves. We can open to everything with the healing force of love. When we feel love, our mind is expansive and open enough to include the entirety of life in full awareness, both its pleasures and its pains, we feel neither betrayed by pain or overcome by it, and thus we can contact that which is undamaged within us regardless of the situation. Metta sees truly that our integrity is inviolate, no matter what our life situation may be.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“All beings want to be happy, yet so very few know how. It is out of ignorance that any of us cause suffering, for ourselves or for others”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“For all of us, love can be the natural state of our own being; naturally at peace, naturally connected, because this becomes the reflection of who we simply are.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“To reteach a thing its loveliness is the nature of metta. Through lovingkindness, everyone & everything can flower again from within.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“Metta sees truly that our integrity is inviolate, no matter what our life situation may be. We do not need to fear anything. We are whole: our deepest happiness is intrinsic to the nature of our minds, and it is not damaged through uncertainty and change.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“Seeking is endless. It never comes to a state of rest; it never ceases.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“Buddha first taught metta meditation as an antidote: as a way of surmounting terrible fear when it arises.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“By practicing meditation we establish love, compassion, sympathetic joy & equanimity as our home.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“Like water poured from one vessel to another, metta flows freely, taking the shape of each situation without changing its essence.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“Can you revise your perceptions to see the world in terms of suffering and the end of suffering, instead of good and bad? To see the world in terms of suffering and the end of suffering is Buddha-mind, and will lead us away from righteousness and anger. Get in touch with your own Buddha-mind, and you will uncover a healing force of compassion.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“The foundation of metta practice is to know how to be our own friend. According to the Buddha, “You can search throughout the entire universe for someone who is more deserving of your love and affection than you are yourself, and that person is not to be found anywhere. You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“When we have insight into our inner world and what brings us happiness, then wordlessly, intuitively, we understand others. As though there were no longer a barrier defining the boundaries of our caring, we can feel close to others’ experience of life. We see that when we are angry, there is an element of pain in the anger that is not different from the pain that others feel when they are angry. When we feel love, there is a distinct and special joy in that feeling. We come to know that this is the nature of love itself, and that other beings filled with love experience this same joy.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“We can understand the inherent radiance & purity of our minds by understanding metta. Like the mind, metta is not distorted by what it encounters.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“To relinquish the futile effort to control change is one of the strengthening forces of true detachment & thus true love.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“Love exists in itself, not relying on owning or being owned.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“The fulfillment we have in owning, in desiring, is temporary and illusory, because there is nothing at all we can have that we will not lose eventually. And so there is always fear.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“Having' something makes us think we can control it.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“The path to true happiness is one of integrating and fully accepting all aspects of our experience. This integration is represented in the Taoist symbol of yin/yang, a circle which is half dark and half light. In the midst of the dark area is a spot of light, and in the midst of the light area is a spot of darkness. Even in the depths of darkness, the light is implicit. Even in the heart of light, the dark is understood, acknowledged, and absorbed. If things are not going well for us in life and we are suffering, we are not defeated by the pain or closed off to the light. If things are going well and we are happy, we are not defensively trying to deny the possibility of suffering. This unity, this integration, comes from deeply accepting darkness and light, and therefore being able to be in both simultaneously.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“The Buddha actually described at some length what he meant by being a good friend in the world. He talked about a good friend as someone who is constant in our times of happiness and also in our times of adversity or unhappiness. A friend will not forsake us when we are in trouble nor rejoice in our misfortune. The Buddha described a true friend as being a helper, someone who will protect us when we are unable to take care of ourselves, who will be a refuge to us when we are afraid.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“He was amazed to find that the Karmapa, an eminent spiritual leader known the world over, treated him as though his visit were one of the most important things that had ever happened to the Karmapa in his life. This treatment did not manifest through grandiose gestures or ceremony, but rather through the simplicity and completeness of the Karmapa’s presence, which offered my friend an experience of being completely loved. When I heard this story, I thought about how many conversations I have had during which my attention was halfhearted. I might be thinking about the next thing I had to do or the next person I had to talk to. How unfair that lack of attention now seems! The simple act of being completely present to another person is truly an act of love—no drama is required.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“Generosity has such power because it is characterized by the inner quality of letting go or relinquishing.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“When we practice metta, we open continuously to the truth of our actual experience, changing our relationship to life.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“With attachment all that seems to exist is just me & that object I desire.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“Sharing food is a metaphor for all giving. When we offer someone food, we are not just giving that person something to eat; we are giving far more. We give strength, health, beauty, clarity of mind, and even life, because none of those things would be possible without food. So when we feed another, this is what we are offering: the substance of life itself.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“One of the most powerful aspects of delusion, or ignorance, is the belief that what we do does not really matter.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“However, when we see the world through the eyes of desire, we are always hoping that it will somehow magically provide us only good things; there will be no bad things, no painful things. Although the world actually is magically providing, that does not mean there is no pain. Pain is not a sign of things gone wrong. Our lives are actually a constant succession of pleasure and pain, getting what we want, then losing it. We experience pleasure and pain, gain and loss, praise and blame, fame and disrepute, constantly changing out of our control. This is what the world is naturally providing, and still we can be happy.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“Our vision becomes very narrow when we need things to be a certain way and cannot accept things the way they actually are.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness
“The Buddha taught that we can feel pleasure fully, yet without craving or clinging, without defining it as our ultimate happiness. We can feel pain fully without condemning or hating it. And we can experience neutral events by being fully present, so that they are not just fill-in times until something more exciting comes along.”
Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness

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