The complete works of Rudyard Kipling Quotes

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The complete works of Rudyard Kipling The complete works of Rudyard Kipling by Rudyard Kipling
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The complete works of Rudyard Kipling Quotes Showing 1-14 of 14
“Fit to do anything,” said the Second-in-Command enthusiastically. “But it seems to me they’re a thought too young and tender for the work in hand. It’s bitter cold up at the Front now.” “They’re sound enough,” said the Colonel. “We must take our chance of sick casualties.”
Rudyard Kipling, The complete works of Rudyard Kipling
“If you can dream and not make dreams your master”
Rudyard Kipling, The complete works of Rudyard Kipling
“If he is not moved about, and begins to feel cold at the pit of the stomach, and in that crisis is badly mauled and hears orders that were never given, he will break, and he will break badly, and of all things under the light of the Sun there is nothing more terrible than a broken British regiment. When the worst comes to the worst and the panic is really epidemic, the men must be e’en let go, and the Company Commanders had better escape to the enemy and stay there for safety’s sake. If they can be made to come again they are not pleasant men to meet; because they will not break twice.”
Rudyard Kipling, The complete works of Rudyard Kipling
“Half a dozen epicene young pagans who haven’t even been to Algiers will tell you, first, that your notion is borrowed, and, secondly, that it isn’t Art. ‘This comes of my leaving town for a month. Dickie, you’ve been promenading among the toy-shops and hearing people talk.’ ‘I couldn’t help it,’ said Dick, penitently. ‘You weren’t here, and it was lonely these long evenings. A man can’t work for ever.’ ‘A man might have gone to a pub, and got decently drunk.”
Rudyard Kipling, The Complete Works of Rudyard Kipling
“Well, it’s only to you I’m talking. I did him just as well as I knew how, making allowance for the slickness of oils. Then the art-manager of that abandoned paper said that his subscribers wouldn’t like it. It was brutal and coarse and violent,—man being naturally gentle when he’s fighting for his life. They wanted something more restful, with a little more colour. I could have said a good deal, but you might as well talk to a sheep as an art-manager. I took my “Last Shot” back. Behold the result! I put him into a lovely red coat without a speck on it. That is Art. I polished his boots,—observe the high light on the toe. That is Art. I cleaned his rifle,—rifles are always clean on service,—because that is Art.”
Rudyard Kipling, The Complete Works of Rudyard Kipling
“Which homily brings me directly to a brace of the most finished little fiends that ever banged drum or tootled fife in the Band of a British Regiment. They ended their sinful career by open and flagrant mutiny and were shot for it. Their names were Jakin and Lew — Piggy Lew and they were bold, bad drummer-boys, both of them frequently birched by the Drum-Major of the Fore and Aft.”
Rudyard Kipling, The complete works of Rudyard Kipling
“Our time is short. I shouldn’t have believed that this morning; but now things are different. Binkie, where was Moses when the light went out?’ Binkie smiled from ear to ear, as a well-bred terrier should, but made no suggestion.”
Rudyard Kipling, The Complete Works of Rudyard Kipling
“The Fore and Aft had enjoyed unbroken peace for five days, and were beginning, in spite of dysentery, to recover their nerve. But they were not happy, for they did not know the work in hand, and had they known, would not have known how to do it. Throughout those five days in which old soldiers might have taught them the craft of the game, they discussed together their misadventures in the past — how such an one was alive at dawn and dead ere the dusk,”
Rudyard Kipling, The complete works of Rudyard Kipling
“Half a dozen epicene young pagans who haven’t even been to Algiers will tell you, first, that your notion is borrowed, and, secondly, that it isn’t Art. ‘‘This comes of my leaving town for a month. Dickie, you’ve been promenading among the toy-shops and hearing people talk.’ ‘I couldn’t help it,’ said Dick, penitently. ‘You weren’t here, and it was lonely these long evenings. A man can’t work for ever.’ ‘A man might have gone to a pub, and got decently drunk.”
Rudyard Kipling, The complete works of Rudyard Kipling
“Dick laughed. ‘Well, it’s only to you I’m talking. I did him just as well as I knew how, making allowance for the slickness of oils. Then the art-manager of that abandoned paper said that his subscribers wouldn’t like it. It was brutal and coarse and violent, — man being naturally gentle when he’s fighting for his life. They wanted something more restful, with a little more colour. I could have said a good deal, but you might as well talk to a sheep as an art-manager. I took my “Last Shot” back. Behold the result! I put him into a lovely red coat without a speck on it. That is Art. I polished his boots, — observe the high light on the toe. That is Art. I cleaned his rifle, — rifles are always clean on service, — because that is Art.”
Rudyard Kipling, The complete works of Rudyard Kipling
“and he sat on all their laps one after the other, because every well-brought-up mongoose always hopes to be a house-mongoose some day and have rooms to run about in,”
Rudyard Kipling, The complete works of Rudyard Kipling
“Hear! I will sing you the praise of the bottle-tailed Rikki, with eyeballs of red! (Here Rikki-tikki interrupted, and the rest of the song is lost.)”
Rudyard Kipling, The complete works of Rudyard Kipling
“Two words breathed into the stables of a certain Cavalry Regiment will bring the men out into the streets with belts and mops and bad language; but a whisper of “Fore and Aft” will bring out this regiment with rifles.”
Rudyard Kipling, The complete works of Rudyard Kipling
“He has, let us say, been in the service of the Empress for, perhaps, four years. He will leave in another two years. He has no inherited morals, and four years are not sufficient to drive toughness into his fibre, or to teach him how holy a thing is his Regiment. He wants to drink, he wants to enjoy himself — in India he wants to save money — and he does not in the least like getting hurt. He has received just sufficient education to make him understand half the purport of the orders he receives, and to speculate on the nature of clean, incised, and shattering wounds. Thus, if he is told to deploy under fire preparatory to an attack, he knows that he runs a very great risk of being killed while he is deploying, and suspects that he is being thrown away to gain ten minutes’ time. He may either deploy with desperate swiftness, or he may shuffle, or bunch, or break, according to the discipline under which he has lain for four years.”
Rudyard Kipling, The complete works of Rudyard Kipling