The Lost Art of Walking Quotes

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The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism by Geoff Nicholson
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“Walk some night on a suburban street and pass house after house on both sides of the same street each with the lamplight of the living room, shining golden, and inside the little blue square of the television, each living family riveting its attention on probably one show; nobody talking; silence in the yards; dogs barking at you because you pass on human feet instead of wheels.”
Geoff Nicholson, The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism
“It occurred to me, not exactly for the first time, that psychogeography didn't have much to do with the actual experience of walking. It was a nice idea, a clever idea, an art project, a conceit, but it had very little to do with any real walking, with any real experience of walking. And it confirmed for me what I'd really known all along, that walking isn't much good as a theoretical experience. You can dress it up any way you like, but walking remains resolutely simple, basic, analog. That's why I love it and love doing it. And in that respect--stay with me on this--it's not entirely unlike a martini. Sure you can add things to martinis, like chocolate or an olive stuffed with blue cheese or, God forbid, cotton candy, and similarly you can add things to your walks--constraints, shapes, notions of the mapping of utopian spaces--but you don't need to. And really, why would you? Why spoil a good drink? Why spoil a good walk?”
Geoff Nicholson, The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism
“Your own exploration therefore has to be personalized; you're doing it for yourself, increasing your own store of particular knowledge, walking your own eccentric version of the city. ”
Geoff Nicholson, The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism
tags: london
“Modern literary theory sees a similarity between walking and writing that I find persuasive: words inscribe a text in the same way that a walk inscribes space. In The practicse of Everyday Life, Michel de Certeau writes, 'The act of walking is a process of appropriation of the topographical system on the part of the pedestrian; it is a special acting-out of the place...and it implies relations among differentiated positions.' I think this is a fancy way of saying that writing is one way of making the world our own, and that walking is another.”
Geoff Nicholson, The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism
tags: 27, walking