The Art of Public Speaking Quotes

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The Art of Public Speaking The Art of Public Speaking by Dale Carnegie
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The Art of Public Speaking Quotes Showing 1-30 of 30
“Students of public speaking continually ask, "How can I overcome
self-consciousness and the fear that paralyzes me before an
audience?"
Did you ever notice in looking from a train window that some
horses feed near the track and never even pause to look up at the
thundering cars, while just ahead at the next railroad crossing a
farmer's wife will be nervously trying to quiet her scared horse as
the train goes by?
How would you cure a horse that is afraid of cars—graze him in a
back-woods lot where he would never see steam-engines or
automobiles, or drive or pasture him where he would frequently see
the machines?
Apply horse-sense to ridding yourself of self-consciousness and
fear: face an audience as frequently as you can, and you will soon stop shying. You can never attain
freedom from stage-fright by reading a treatise. A book may give
you excellent suggestions on how best to conduct yourself in the
water, but sooner or later you must get wet, perhaps even strangle
and be "half scared to death." There are a great many "wetless"
bathing suits worn at the seashore, but no one ever learns to swim
in them. To plunge is the only way.”
Dale Breckenridge Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“The first
sign of greatness is when a man does not attempt to look and act
great. Before you can call yourself a man at all, Kipling assures
us, you must "not look too good nor talk too wise.”
Dale Breckenridge Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“Live an active life among people who are doing worthwhile things, keep eyes and ears and mind and heart open to absorb truth, and then tell of the things you know, as if you know them. The world will listen, for the world loves nothing so much as real life.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“Destiny is not a matter of chance. It is a matter of choice.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“They that soar too high, often fall hard, making a low and level Dwelling preferable. The tallest Trees are most in the Power of the Winds, and Ambitious Men of the Blasts of Fortune. Buildings have need of a good Foundation, that lie so much exposed to the Weather.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“Monotony reveals our limitations.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“Blacksmiths sometimes twist a rope tight around the nose of a horse, and by thus inflicting a little pain they distract his attention from the shoeing process. One way to get air out of a
glass is to pour in water. Be Absorbed by Your Subject”
Dale Breckenridge Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“Apply the blacksmith's homely principle when you are speaking. If you feel deeply about your subject you will be able to think of little else. Concentration is a process of distraction from less important matters. It is too late to think about the cut of your coat when once you are upon the platform, so centre your interest on what you are about to say—fill your mind with your speech-material and, like the infilling water in the glass, it will drive out your unsubstantial fears.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“There is only one excuse for a speaker's asking the attention of his audience: he must have either truth or entertainment for them.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“A blow that would kill a civilized man soon heals on a savage. The higher we go in the scale of life, the greater is the capacity for suffering.”
Dale Breckenridge Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“It never hurts a fool to appear before an
audience, for his capacity is not a capacity for feeling.”
Dale Breckenridge Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
tags: fear, fools
“If you believe you will fail, there is no hope for you. You will.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“audience?”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“Practise, practise, PRACTISE in speaking before an audience will tend to remove all fear of audiences, just as practise in swimming will lead to confidence and facility in the water. You must learn to speak by speaking.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“conformity”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“All things are ready if the mind be so.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“The world owes its progress to the men who have dared,”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“If you believe you will fail, there is no hope for you. You will.

Rid yourself of this I-am-a-poor-worm-in-the-dust idea. You are a god, with infinite capabilities. "All things are ready if the mind be so." The eagle looks the cloudless sun in the face.”
J. Berg Esenwein, The Art of Public Speaking
“Cut out modifiers. Cut out connectives. Begin with words that demand attention. “End with words that deserve distinction,” says Prof. Barrett Wendell.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“Observe Nature, study her laws, and obey them in your speaking.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“It is often dangerous to rush into battle without pausing for preparation or waiting for recruits.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“TRUE WORTH is in BEING—NOT SEEMING—in doing each day that goes by SOME LITTLE GOOD, not in DREAMING of GREAT THINGS to do by and by. For whatever men say in their BLINDNESS, and in spite of the FOLLIES of YOUTH, there is nothing so KINGLY as KINDNESS, and nothing so ROYAL as TRUTH.—Anonymous.”
J. Berg Esenwein, The Art of Public Speaking
“Concentration is a process of distraction from less important matters. It”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“Speech is silvern, Silence is golden; Speech is human, Silence is divine.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“A watch manufacturer in New York tried out two series of watch advertisements; one argued the superior construction, workmanship, durability, and guarantee offered with the watch; the other was headed, "A Watch to be Proud of," and dwelt upon the pleasure and pride of ownership. The latter series sold twice as many as the former. A salesman for a locomotive works informed the writer that in selling railroad engines emotional appeal was stronger than an argument based on mechanical excellence.”
J. Berg Esenwein, The Art of Public Speaking
“In omnibus negotiis prius quam aggrediare, adhibenda est præparatio diligens—In all matters before beginning a diligent preparation should be made.”
J. Berg (Joseph Berg) Esenwein, The Art of Public Speaking
“The baseball pitcher, the bowler in cricket, the tennis server, all know the value of change of pace—change of tempo—in delivering their ball, and so must the public speaker observe its power.”
J. Berg Esenwein, The Art of Public Speaking
“There are a great many “wetless” bathing suits worn at the seashore, but no one ever learns to swim in them. To plunge is the only way.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“Apply horse-sense to ridding yourself of self-consciousness and fear: face an audience as frequently as you can, and you will soon stop shying.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking
“The gun that scatters too much does not bag the birds.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking