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Outliers: The Story of Success Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell
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Outliers Quotes Showing 241-270 of 482
“Broncos hockey game in southern Alberta, a team that played in the same Major Junior A league as the Vancouver Giants”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Write down as many different uses that you can think of for the following objects: a brick a blanket This is an example of what’s called a “divergence test”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Those immigrants, in turn, sent word back to Roseto about the promise of the New World, and soon one”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“out·li·er \-,l()r\ noun 1: something”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Who we are cannot be separated from where we’re from —”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“La herencia cultural importa; y una vez que hemos visto el sorprendente efecto de cosas tales como la distancia al poder o el hecho de poder expresarse en un cuarto de segundo en lugar de invertir un tercio o una mitad, no es difícil preguntarse qué otras herencias culturales tendrán un impacto sobre nuestras tareas intelectuales del siglo XXI.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Fuera de serie. Por qué unas personas tienen éxito y otras no
“his becoming a true outlier, we have to know a lot more about him than that.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“In a devastating critique, the sociologist Pitirim Sorokin once showed that if Terman had simply put together a randomly selected group of children from the same kinds of family backgrounds as the Termites—and”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Louis and Regina found a tiny apartment on Eldridge Street, on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, for $8 a month. Louis then took to the streets, looking for work. He saw peddlers and fruit sellers and sidewalks crammed with pushcarts. The noise and activity and energy dwarfed what he had known in the Old World. He was first overwhelmed, then invigorated. He went”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“neighborhood was filled with engineers from Hewlett-Packard, then as now one of”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“manufacturing started in earnest. It was when all the rules by which”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“our notion that it is the best and the brightest who effortlessly rise to the top is much too simplistic.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Those three things—autonomy, complexity, and a connection between effort and reward—are, most people agree, the three qualities that work has to have if it is to be satisfying. It”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“that extra practice under his belt, he really is better, so he’s the one more likely to make it to”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“It’s the rich who get the biggest tax breaks. It’s the best students who get the best teaching and most attention. And”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The kinds of errors that cause plane crashes are invariably errors of teamwork and communication. One pilot knows something important and somehow doesn’t tell the other pilot. One pilot does something wrong, and the other pilot doesn’t catch the error. A tricky situation needs to be resolved through a complex series of steps—and somehow the pilots fail to coordinate and miss one of them. “The whole flight-deck design is intended to be operated by two people, and that operation works best when you have one person checking the other, or both people willing to participate,” says Earl Weener, who was for many years chief engineer for safety at Boeing. “Airplanes”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“any attempt to downplay or sugarcoat the meaning of what is being said. We mitigate when we’re being polite, or when we’re ashamed or embarrassed, or when we’re being deferential to authority. If you want your boss to do you a favor, you”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“discouraged the”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The Matthew Effect “FOR UNTO EVERYONE THAT HATH SHALL BE GIVEN, AND HE SHALL HAVE ABUNDANCE. BUT FROM HIM THAT HATH NOT SHALL BE TAKEN AWAY EVEN THAT WHICH HE”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“born”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Sometimes we're better off if the mind behind the locked door makes our decisions for us”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“surely something to that. But it wasn’t just the children of rabbis who went to law school. It was the children of garment workers. And their critical advantage in climbing the professional ladder”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“manuscript. Happily, they complied, and Outliers is infinitely”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“If I offered you a choice between being an architect for $75,000 a year and working in a tollbooth every day for the rest of your life for $100,000 a year, which would you take? I’m guessing the former, because there is complexity, autonomy, and a relationship between effort and reward in doing creative work, and that’s worth more to most of us than money. Work that fulfills those three criteria is meaningful. Being a teacher is meaningful. Being a physician is meaningful. So is being an entrepreneur,”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“captures this poignancy in his memoir, which was published in 1942. He called it The Happiest Man. After numerous chapters brimming with optimism and cheer, the book ends with the sobering reality of Nazi-dominated Europe. Had The Happiest Man been published in 1945, when the”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The small initial advantage that the child born in the early part of the year has over”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“One of the main reasons college professors accept a lower paycheck than they could get in private industry is that university life gives them the freedom to do what they want to do and what they feel is right. Langan has Harvard backwards.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“R 6’3”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Biologists often talk about the “ecology” of an organism: the tallest oak in the forest is the tallest not just because it grew from the hardiest acorn; it is the tallest also because no other trees blocked its sunlight, the soil around it was deep and rich, no rabbit chewed through its bark as a sapling, and no lumberjack cut it down before it matured.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“away from or classed differently from a main or related body 2: a statistical observation that is markedly different in value from the others of the sample 1.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success