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Outliers: The Story of Success Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell
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Outliers Quotes Showing 181-210 of 482
“the day when a computer would come along that was small and inexpensive enough for an ordinary person to use and own. That day had finally arrived. If January 1975 was the dawn of the personal computer age, then who would”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“elders.’ ” Working in collaboration with a small group of programmers, Joy took on the task of rewriting UNIX, which was a software system”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Lareau calls the middle-class parenting style “concerted cultivation.” It’s an attempt to actively “foster and assess a child’s talents, opinions and skills.” Poor parents tend to follow, by contrast, a strategy of “accomplishment of natural growth.” They see as their responsibility to”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“El alto índice de distancia al poder de los colombianos podría haber creado frustración al copiloto, porque el capitán no logró mostrar la clase de toma de decisiones clara (e incluso autocrática) que esperan las culturas con alta distancia al poder. Puede que los primeros y segundos oficiales estuvieran esperando que el capitán tomara las decisiones, pero también puede que ellos mismos fueran incapaces de plantear alternativas. Klotz se ve como un subordinado. Solucionar la crisis no es su trabajo, sino del capitán, y éste está agotado y no dice nada. Y luego están los autoritarios controladores del aeropuerto Kennedy dando órdenes a los aviones. Klotz intenta decirles que tiene problemas. Pero está usando su propio lenguaje cultural, hablando como un subordinado a un superior. Pero los controladores no son colombianos. Son neoyorquinos con un índice de distancia al poder bajo. No ven ningún hueco jerárquico entre ellos y los pilotos y, para ellos, el discurso mitigado de un piloto no significa que el emisor esté siendo convenientemente respetuoso con un superior; significa que el piloto no tiene ningún problema.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Fuera de serie. Por qué unas personas tienen éxito y otras no
“Es la última comunicación entre Avianca y la torre de control, unos minutos antes del choque. Klotz acaba de decir: «Supongo. Muchas gracias», en respuesta a la pregunta del controlador sobre el estado del combustible. Entonces el capitán Caviedes se vuelve hacia Klotz. CAVIEDES: ¿Qué dijo? KLOTZ: El tipo se enojó. ¿Cómo que se enojó? ¡Han herido los sentimientos de Klotz! Su avión se encuentra a escasos momentos del desastre. Pero no puede escaparse de la dinámica que le dicta su cultura, en la que los subordinados deben respetar las órdenes de sus superiores. En su mente, él ha intentado y no logrado comunicar la grave situación, y su única conclusión es que de algún modo debe de haber ofendido a sus superiores de la torre de control.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Fuera de serie. Por qué unas personas tienen éxito y otras no
“question”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Cultural legacies are powerful forces. They have deep roots and long lives. They persist, generation after generation, virtually intact, even as the economic and social and demographic conditions that spawned them have vanished, and they play such a role in directing attitudes and behavior that we cannot make sense of our world without them.*”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Virtually all of the advantage that wealthy students have over poor students is the result of differences in the way privileged kids learn while they are not in school.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“could, however. When we say that people like Langan are”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“it is when thus relieved from the state of tension belonging to actual study that boys and girls, as well as men and women, acquire the habit of thought and reflection, and of forming their own conclusions, independently of what they are taught and the authority of others.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“in the snake pit. (Officially, it was called the counting room.) Lawyers for each side met with inspectors of elections,”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Harlan that allowed them to reproduce in the New World the culture of honor they had created in the Old World. “To the first settlers, the American backcountry was a dangerous environment, just as the British borderlands had been,” the historian David Hackett Fischer writes in Albion’s Seed. Much of the southern highlands were “debatable lands” in the border sense of a contested territory without established government or the rule of law. The borderers were more at home”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Cultural legacies matter, and once we've seen the surprising effects of such things as power distance and numbers that can be said in a quarter as opposed to a third of a second, it's hard not to wonder how many other cultural legacies have an impact on our twenty-first century intellectual tasks.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“and unruly. Adversaries were sometimes in T-shirts, eating watermelon or sharing a bottle of scotch. In rare cases,”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“What’s the rest of the country like, Uncle Al?’ And he said, ‘Kiddo. When you leave New York, every place is Bridgeport.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“6. Before the Memorial Cup final, Gord Wasden—the father of one of the Medicine Hat Tigers—stood by the side of the ice, talking about his son Scott. He was wearing a Medicine Hat baseball cap and a black Medicine Hat T-shirt. “When he was four and five years old,” Wasden”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“leads to a church, the Madonna del Carmine—Our Lady of Mount Carmine. Narrow stone steps run”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The school year in the United States is, on average, 180 days long. The South Korean school year is 220 days long. The Japanese school year is 243 days long.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Lareau stresses that one style isn’t morally better than the other. The poorer children were, to her mind, often better behaved, less whiny, more creative in making use of their own time, and had a well-developed sense of independence. But in practical terms, concerted cultivation has enormous advantages. The heavily scheduled middle-class child is exposed to a constantly shifting set of experiences. She learns teamwork and how to cope in highly structured settings. She is taught how to interact comfortably with adults, and to speak up when she needs to. In Lareau’s words, the middle-class children learn a sense of “entitlement.” That word, of course, has negative connotations these days. But Lareau means it in the best sense of the term: “They acted as though they had a right to pursue their own individual preferences and to actively manage interactions in institutional settings. They appeared comfortable in those settings; they were open to sharing information and asking for attention…. It was common practice among middle-class children to shift interactions to suit their preferences.” They knew the rules. “Even in fourth grade, middle-class children appeared to be acting on their own behalf to gain advantages. They made special requests of teachers and doctors to adjust procedures to accommodate their desires.” By contrast, the working-class and poor children were characterized by “an emerging sense of distance, distrust, and constraint.” They didn’t know how to get their way, or how to “customize”—using Lareau’s wonderful term—whatever environment they were in, for their best purposes.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The thing you have to understand about that crash,” Ratwatte said, “is that New York air traffic controllers are famous for being rude, aggressive, and bullying. They are also”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Hard work is a prison sentence only if it does not have meaning. Once it does, it becomes the kind of thing that makes you grab your wife around the waist and dance”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“lower. As the sociologist John Shelton Reed has written, “The homicides in which the South seems to specialize are those in which someone is being killed by someone he (or often she) knows, for reasons both killer and victim understand.” Reed adds: “The statistics show that the Southerner who can avoid arguments and adultery is as safe as any other American, and probably safer.” In the backcountry, violence wasn’t for economic gain. It was personal. You fought over your honor. Many years ago, the southern newspaperman Hodding Carter told the story of how as a young man he served on a jury. As Reed describes it: The case before the jury involved an irascible gentleman who lived”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“There were clear differences in how the young men responded to being called a bad name. For some, the insult changed their behavior. For some it didn’t. The deciding factor in how they reacted wasn’t how emotionally secure they were, or whether they were intellectuals or jocks, or whether they were physically imposing or not. What mattered—and I think you can guess where this is headed—was where they were from. Most of the young men from the northern part of the United States treated the incident with amusement. They laughed it off. Their handshakes were unchanged. Their levels of cortisol actually went down, as if they were unconsciously trying to defuse their own anger. Only a few of them had Steve get violent with Larry. But the southerners? Oh, my. They were angry. Their cortisol and testosterone jumped. Their handshakes got firm. Steve was all over Larry. “We even played this game of chicken,” Cohen said. “We sent the students back down the hallways, and around the corner comes another confederate. The hallway is blocked, so there’s only room for one of them to pass. The guy we used was six three, two hundred fifty pounds. He used to play college football. He was now working as a bouncer in a college bar. He was walking down the hall in business mode—the way you walk through a bar when you are trying to break up a fight. The question was: how close do they get to the bouncer before they get out of the way? And believe me, they always get out of the way.” For the northerners, there was almost no effect. They got out of the way five or six feet beforehand, whether they had been insulted or not. The southerners, by contrast, were downright deferential in normal circumstances, stepping aside with more than nine feet to go. But if they had just been insulted? Less than two feet. Call a southerner an asshole, and he’s itching for a fight. What Cohen and Nisbett were seeing in that long hall was the culture of honor in action: the southerners were reacting like Wix Howard did when Little Bob Turner accused him of cheating at poker.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Wolf was taken aback. This was the 1950s, years before the advent of cholesterol-lowering drugs and aggressive measures to prevent heart disease. Heart attacks were an epidemic in the United States. They were the leading cause of death in men under the age of sixty-five. It was impossible to be a doctor, common sense said, and not see heart disease. Wolf decided to investigate. He enlisted the support of some of his students and colleagues from Oklahoma. They gathered together the death certificates from residents of the”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“By contrast, the merely good students had totaled eight thousand hours, and the future music teachers had totaled just over four thousand hours. Ericsson and his colleagues then compared amateur pianists with professional pianists. The same pattern emerged. The amateurs never practiced more than about three hours a week over the course of their childhood, and by the age of twenty they had totaled two thousand hours of practice. The professionals, on the other hand, steadily increased their practice time every year, until by the age of twenty they, like the violinists, had reached ten thousand hours. The striking thing about Ericsson’s study is that he and his colleagues couldn’t find any “naturals,” musicians who floated effortlessly to the top while practicing a fraction of the time their peers did. Nor could they find any “grinds,” people who worked harder than everyone else, yet just didn’t have what it takes to break the top ranks. Their research suggests that once a musician has enough ability to get into a top music school, the thing that distinguishes one performer from another is how hard he or she works. That’s it. And what’s more, the people at the very top don’t work just harder or even much harder than everyone else. They work much, much harder. The idea that excellence at performing a complex task requires a critical minimum level of practice surfaces again and again in studies of expertise. In fact, researchers have settled on what they believe is the magic number for true expertise: ten thousand hours.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“use as ammunition, as pendulum,”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“It’s not enough to ask what successful people are like, in other words. It is only by asking where they are from that we can unravel the logic behind who succeeds and who doesn’t.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“there is complexity, autonomy, and a relationship between effort and reward in doing creative work, and that’s worth more to most of us than money.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Why are we so squeamish? Why is the fact that each of us comes from a culture with its own distinctive mix of strengths and weaknesses, tendencies and predispositions, so difficult to acknowledge?”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“the closer psychologists look at the careers of the gifted, the smaller the role innate talent seems to play and the bigger the role preparation seems to play.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success