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Outliers: The Story of Success Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell
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Outliers Quotes Showing 151-180 of 482
“though, will improve her math and reading skills, and every carefree summer day she spends puts her further and further behind Alex. Alex isn’t necessarily smarter than Katie. He’s just out-learning her: he’s putting in a few solid months of learning during the summer while she watches television and plays outside. What Alexander’s work suggests is that the way in which education has been discussed in the United States”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“We are too much in awe of those who succeed and far too dismissive of those who fail. And, most of all, we become much too passive. We overlook just how large a role we all play—and by “we” I mean society—in determining who makes it and who doesn’t.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The kinds of errors that cause plane crashes are invariably errors of teamwork and communication.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“and they were the subjects of what would become one of the most famous psychological studies in history. For the rest of his life, Terman watched over his charges like a mother hen. They were tracked”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“have programs for the “gifted.” Elite universities often require that students take an intelligence test (such as the American Scholastic Aptitude”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“far in Outliers, we’ve seen that extraordinary achievement is less about talent than it is about”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“far in Outliers, we’ve seen that extraordinary achievement is less about talent than it is about opportunity. In this chapter, I want to try to dig deeper into why that’s the case by looking at the outlier in its purest and most distilled form—the genius. For years, we’ve taken our”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“For centuries, the paesani of Roseto worked in the marble quarries in the surrounding hills, or cultivated the fields in the terraced valley below, walking four and five miles down the mountain in the morning and then making the long journey”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Historians start with Cleopatra and the pharaohs and comb through every year in human history ever since, looking in every corner of the world for evidence of extraordinary wealth, and almost 20 percent of the names they end up with come from”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“home. What did two of Louis and Regina Borgenicht’s sons do? They went to law school, and no less than nine of their grandchildren ended up as doctors and lawyers as well. Here is the most remarkable of Farkas’s family trees. It belongs to a Jewish family from”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Even the most gifted of lawyers, equipped with the best of family lessons, cannot escape the limitations of their generation.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Jewish immigrants like the Floms and the Borgenichts and the Janklows were not like the other immigrants who came to America in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Irish and the Italians were peasants, tenant farmers from the impoverished countryside of Europe. Not so the Jews. For centuries in Europe, they had been forbidden to own land, so they had clustered in cities and towns, taking up urban trades and professions. Seventy percent of the Eastern European Jews who came through Ellis Island in the thirty years or so before the First World War had some kind of occupational skill. They had owned small groceries or jewelry stores. They had been bookbinders or watchmakers. Overwhelmingly, though, their experience lay in the clothing trade. They were tailors and dressmakers, hat and cap makers, and furriers and tanners.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“starts to think out loud. It’s obvious she’s on the verge of figuring something out. “Well, I knew this, though… but… I knew that. For each one up, it goes that many over. I’m still somewhat confused as”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“public schools in the 1940s, then to City College in upper Manhattan, and then to New York University Law School. The fourth partner was George Katz. He was born in 1931. He grew up in a one-bedroom first-floor apartment in the Bronx. His parents were”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The people at the top don't just work harder. They work much, much harder.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“rep” squad—the all-star”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“another magic”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“197”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“miles down the mountain in the morning and then making the long journey back up the hill at night. Life was hard. The townsfolk were barely literate and desperately poor and without much hope for economic betterment until word reached Roseto at the end”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“acknowledging”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The much-storied disenchantment with mathematics among Western children starts in the third and fourth grades, and Fuson argues that perhaps a part of that disenchantment is due to the fact that math doesn’t seem to make sense; its linguistic structure is clumsy; its basic rules seem arbitrary and complicated.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The typical accident involves seven consecutive human errors. One”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“began buying land on a rocky hillside connected”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“For centuries, the paesani of Roseto worked in the marble quarries in the surrounding hills, or cultivated the fields in the terraced valley below, walking four and five miles down the mountain in the morning and then making the long journey back up the hill at night. Life was hard. The townsfolk were barely literate and desperately poor”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“immigrants who are from those countries—have substantially outperformed their Western counterparts at mathematics, and the typical assumption is that it has something to do with a”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“at the University of Oklahoma. He spent his summers on a farm in Pennsylvania, not far from Roseto—although that, of course, didn’t mean much, since Roseto was so much in its own world that it was possible to live in the next town and never know much about it. “One of the times when we were up”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“eight-year-old because he’s too small. So he doesn’t get the extra practice. And without that extra practice, he has no chance at hitting ten thousand hours by the time the professional hockey teams start looking for players. And without ten thousand hours under his belt, there is no way he can ever master the skills necessary to play at the top level. Even Mozart—the greatest musical prodigy of all time—couldn’t hit his stride until he had his ten”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“When Bruhn and Wolf first presented their findings to the medical community, you can imagine the kind of skepticism they faced. They went to conferences where their peers were presenting long rows of data arrayed in complex charts and referring to this kind of gene or that kind of physiological process, and they themselves were talking instead about the mysterious and magical benefits of people stopping to talk to one another on the street and of having three generations under one roof. Living a long life, the conventional wisdom at the time said, depended to a great extent on who we were—that is, our genes. It depended on the decisions we made—on what we chose to eat, and how much we chose to exercise, and how effectively we were treated by the medical system. No one was used to thinking about health in terms of community.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“course, didn’t mean much, since Roseto was so much in its own world that it was possible to live in the next town and never know much about it. “One of the times when”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Hard work is a prison sentence only if it does not have meaning. Once”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success