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Outliers: The Story of Success Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell
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Outliers Quotes Showing 121-150 of 482
“Schools work. The only problem with school, for the kids who aren’t achieving, is that there isn’t enough of it.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“computer would come along that was small and inexpensive enough for an ordinary person to use and own. That day had finally arrived. If January 1975 was the”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“quarter”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Korean hierarchy: formal deference, informal deference, blunt, familiar, intimate, and plain.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The Irish and Italian immigrants who came to New York in the same period didn’t have that advantage. They didn’t have a skill specific to the urban economy. They went to work as day laborers and domestics and construction workers—jobs where you could show up for work every day for thirty years and never learn market research and manufacturing and how to navigate the popular culture and how to negotiate with the Yankees, who ran the world. Or consider the fate of the Mexicans who immigrated to California between 1900 and the end of the 1920s to work in the fields of the big fruit and vegetable growers. They simply exchanged the life of a feudal peasant in Mexico for the life of a feudal peasant in California. “The conditions in the garment industry were every bit as bad,” Soyer goes on. “But as a garment worker, you were closer to the center of the industry. If you are working in a field in California, you have no clue what’s happening to the produce when it gets on the truck. If you are working in a small garment shop, your wages are low, and your conditions are terrible, and your hours are long, but you can see exactly what the successful people are doing, and you can see how you can set up your own job.”*”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“No one who can rise before dawn three hundred sixty days a year fails to make his family rich.”†”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“a hint is the hardest kind of request to decode and the easiest to refuse.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The fatalism of Russian peasant proverbs is contrasted with the self-reliance of Chinese ones by”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Those three things—autonomy, complexity, and a connection between effort and reward—are, most people agree, the three qualities that work has to have if it is to be satisfying. It is not how much money we make that ultimately makes us happy between nine and five. It’s whether our work fulfills us. If I offered you a choice between being an architect for $75,000 a year and working in a tollbooth every day for the rest of your life for $100,000 a year, which would you take? I’m guessing the former, because there is complexity, autonomy, and a relationship between effort and reward in doing creative work, and that’s worth more to most of us than money. Work that fulfills those three criteria is meaningful.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“two”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Uno de los principales motivos por los que un catedrático acepta un sueldo inferior al que podría cobrar en la empresa privada es que la vida universitaria le da la libertad de hacer lo que quiera hacer, lo que considere correcto.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Fuera de serie. Por qué unas personas tienen éxito y otras no
“What is an outlier?”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The particular skill that allows you to talk your way out of a murder rap, or convince your professor to move you from the morning to the afternoon section, is what the psychologist Robert Sternberg calls “practical intelligence.” To Sternberg, practical intelligence includes things like “knowing what to say to whom, knowing when to say it, and knowing how to say it for maximum effect.” It is procedural: it is about knowing how to do something without necessarily knowing why you know it or being able to explain it. It’s practical in nature: that is, it’s not knowledge for its own sake. It’s knowledge that helps you read situations correctly and get what you want.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“The idea that excellence at performing a complex task requires a critical minimum level of practice surfaces again and again in studies of expertise. In fact, researchers have settled on what they believe is the magic number for true expertise: ten thousand hours. “The emerging picture from such studies is that ten thousand hours of practice is required to achieve the level of mastery associated with being a world-class expert—in anything,” writes the neurologist Daniel Levitin. “In study after study, of composers, basketball players, fiction writers, ice skaters, concert pianists, chess players, master criminals, and what have you, this number comes up again and again. Of course, this doesn’t address why some people get more out of their practice sessions than others do. But no one has yet found a case in which true world-class expertise was accomplished in less time. It seems that it takes the brain this long to assimilate all that it needs to know to achieve true mastery.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Roseto Valfortore lies one hundred miles southeast of Rome in the Apennine foothills”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“We have seen," Terman concluded, with more than a touch of disappointment, "that intellect and achievement are far from perfectly correlated.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Of all of Hofstede’s Dimensions, though, perhaps the most interesting is what he called the “Power Distance Index” (PDI). Power distance is concerned with attitudes toward hierarchy, specifically with how much a particular culture values and respects authority. To measure it, Hofstede asked questions like “How frequently, in your experience, does the following problem occur: employees being afraid to express disagreement with their managers?” To what extent do the “less powerful members of organizations and institutions accept and expect that power is distributed unequally?” How much are older people respected and feared? Are power holders entitled to special privileges? “In low–power distance index countries,” Hofstede wrote in his classic text Culture’s Consequences: power is something of which power holders are almost ashamed and they will try to underplay. I once heard a Swedish (low PDI) university official state that in order to exercise power he tried not to look powerful. Leaders may enhance their informal status by renouncing formal symbols. In (low PDI) Austria, Prime Minister Bruno Kreisky was known to sometimes take the streetcar to work. In 1974, I actually saw the Dutch (low PDI) prime minister, Joop den Uyl, on vacation with his motor home at a camping site in Portugal. Such behavior of the powerful would be very unlikely in high-PDI Belgium or France.*”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Cover”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Замысел, в котором все части складываются вполне удачно, никогда не бывает успешным. И только если какая-нибудь досадная мелочь нарушает гармонию, - можно избежать полного разочарования”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“twenty, so they’d be born in the late sixties.” “No, no,” Paula went on. “What month.” “I thought she was crazy,” Barnsley remembers. “But I looked through it, and what she was saying just jumped”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“lunch. We”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“University of Hawaii Press, 1983; The Happiest Man: The Life of Louis Borgenicht (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1942). Used by permission of Lindy Friedman Sobel and Alice Friedman Holzman. The publisher is not responsible for websites (or their content) that are not owned by the publisher. ISBN 978-0-316-04034-1 E3”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“landowner of those parts. An archway to one side leads to a church, the Madonna del Carmine—Our Lady of Mount Carmine. Narrow stone steps run up the hillside, flanked by closely clustered two-story stone houses with red-tile roofs. For centuries, the paesani of Roseto”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“run up the hillside, flanked by closely clustered two-story”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“We tell rags-to-riches stories because we find something captivating in the idea of a lone hero battling overwhelming odds.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“They spent their first night in America sleeping on the floor of a tavern on Mulberry Street, in Manhattan’s Little Italy. Then they ventured west, eventually finding jobs in a slate quarry ninety miles west of the city near the town of Bangor, Pennsylvania. The following year, fifteen Rosetans left Italy”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Мы, люди, способны примерять новую личность и входить в новые роли - и это делает нас свободными. Мы не узники своего культурного наследия. Но прежде чем решить, куда двигаться, мы должны осознать, откуда пришли”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“the palace of the Saggese family, once the great landowner of those parts. An archway”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“Well, it’s roughly how long it takes to put in ten thousand hours of hard practice. Ten thousand hours is the magic number of greatness.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success
“was January”
Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success