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Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love by Marty Cagan
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“We need teams of missionaries, not teams of mercenaries.”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“Product management is about insights and judgment, both of which require a sharp mind. Hard work is also necessary, but for this job, it is not sufficient.”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“It doesn’t matter how good your engineering team is if they are not given something worthwhile to build.”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“Is my product compelling to our target customer? Have we made this product as easy to use as humanly possible? Will this product succeed against the competition? Not today’s competition, but the competition that will be in the market when we ship? Do I know customers who will really buy this product? Not the product I wish we were going to build, but what we’re really going to build? Is my product truly differentiated? Can I explain the differentiation to a company executive in two minutes? To a smart customer in one minute? To an industry analyst in 30 seconds?”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“In the model I'm describing, it is management's responsibility to provide each product team with the specific business objectives they need to tackle. The difference is that they are now prioritizing business results, rather than product ideas. And, yes, it is more than a little ironic that we sometimes need to convince management to focus on business results.”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“Software projects can be thought of as having two distinct stages: figuring out what to build (build the right product), and building it (building the product right). The first stage is dominated by product discovery, and the second stage is all about execution.”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“Keep the focus on minimal product. More on this later, but your job as product manager is not to define the ultimate product, it’s to define the smallest possible product that will meet your goals.”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“Winning products come from the deep understanding of the user’s needs combined with an equally deep understanding of what’s just now possible.”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“An example of a product principle for a movie site may be that the team believes that the user community’s opinions on movies are more valuable than those of professional reviewers. Later, if a studio wants to place reviews on your site, you can then decide if this is consistent with your principles or not. Whether”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“Historically, in the vast majority of innovations in our industry, the customers had no idea that what they now love was even a possibility.”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“As you'll soon see, coming up with winning products is never easy. We need a product that our customers love, yet also works for our business. However, a very large component of what is meant by works for our business is that there is a real market there (large enough to sustain a business), we can successfully differentiate from the many competitors out there, we can cost‐effectively acquire and engage new customers, and we have the go‐to‐market channels and capabilities required to get our product into the hands of our customers.”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“Many teams get into a lot of grief with the concept of a minimum viable product (MVP) because on the one hand we are very motivated to get this out in front of customers fast to get feedback and learn. And, on the other hand, when we do get out there fast, people feel like this so‐called product is an embarrassment to the brand and the company. How could we possibly consider launching this?”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“The tool was first described in 1998 in one of my all-time favorite books, The Inmates Are Running the Asylum, by Alan Cooper. If you haven’t read this book you should—it’s a classic for product managers, designers, and engineers.”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“Leadership is likely frustrated, too, with the lack of innovation from the product teams. All too often, they resort to acquisitions or creating separate “innovation centers” to incubate new businesses in a protected environment. Yet this rarely results in the innovation they're so desperate for.”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“If the first time your developers see an idea is at sprint planning, you have failed. We need to ensure the feasibility before we decide to build, not after. Not only does this end up saving a lot of wasted time, but it turns out that getting the engineer's perspective earlier also tends to improve the solution itself, and it's critical for shared learning.”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“The MVP should be a prototype, not a product.”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“If you find that you are having real trouble recruiting charter users and customers, then it’s very likely you are chasing a problem that isn’t that important, and you will probably have a very hard time selling this product. This is one of the very first reality checks to make sure you are spending your time on something worthwhile.”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“that every product needs a single, accountable product manager, who is responsible for the product definition (the combination of product requirements and user experience design that describe the product to be built). Unfortunately, when I begin working with a company,”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“There are essentially three ways for a product manager to work, and I argue only one of them leads to success:”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“Will the product actually work? Is the product a whole product? How will customers actually think about and buy the product? Is it consistent with how we plan to sell it? Are the product’s strengths consistent with what’s important to our customers? Are we positioning these strengths as aggressively as possible? Is the product worth money? How much money? Why? Can customers get it cheaper elsewhere? Do I understand what the rest of the product team thinks is good about the product? Is it consistent with my own view?”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“The purpose of product discovery is to quickly separate the good ideas from the bad. The output of product discovery is a validated product backlog. Specifically, this means getting answers to four critical questions: Will the user buy this (or choose to use it)? Can the user figure out how to use this? Can our engineers build this? Can our stakeholders support this?”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“As product people, we’re essentially in the idea business. It’s our job to come up with great ideas and then make them a reality.”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“A’s hiring A’s, and B’s hiring C’s.”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“I discovered that there was a tremendous difference between how the best companies produced products and how most companies produced them.”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“product manager, you are responsible for defining the right product, and your engineering counterpart is responsible for building the product right.”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“Good teams have a compelling​ product vision that they pursue with a missionary‐like passion. Bad teams are mercenaries.”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do, and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.” —General George S. Patton, Jr. General”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“Remarkably, in the vast majority of companies (not the ones that are good at product), the actual product teams don't do much ideation themselves. This is because what's really going on is that the ideas are already handed to the product teams in the form of prioritized features on product roadmaps, where most of the items on those roadmaps are coming either from requests from big customers (or prospective customers), or from company stakeholders or execs. Unfortunately, these are rarely the quality of ideas we're looking for.”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love
“Moreover, engineering is essentially an execution-based activity, and it can be hard to perform discovery activities in an organization optimized for execution. So”
Marty Cagan, Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love
“the product vision should be inspiring, and the product strategy should be focused.”
Marty Cagan, INSPIRED: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love

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