The Art of War Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
The Art of War The Art of War by Sun Tzu
271,499 ratings, 3.97 average rating, 8,723 reviews
The Art of War Quotes Showing 121-150 of 677
“first lay plans which will ensure victory, and then lead your army to battle;  if you will not begin with stratagem but rely on brute strength alone, victory will no longer be assured”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“When we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away...”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look upon them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Therefore the skillful leader subdues the enemy's troops without any fighting; he captures their cities without laying siege to them; he overthrows their kingdom without lengthy operations in the field.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Know the enemy and know yourself; in a hundred battles you will never be in peril. When you are ignorant of the enemy, but know yourself, your chances of winning or losing are equal. If ignorant both of your enemy and yourself, you are certain in every battle to be in peril.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Therefore the clever combatant imposes his will on the enemy, but does not allow the enemy's will to be imposed on him.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Thus it is that in war the victorious strategist only seeks battle after the victory is won, whereas he who is destined to defeat first fights and afterwards looks for victory.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“To begin by bluster, but afterwards to take fright at the enemy's numbers, shows a supreme lack of intelligence.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Be stern in the council-chamber, [Show no weakness, and insist on your plans being ratified by the sovereign.] so that you may control the situation.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Sun Tzu said: The art of war recognises nine varieties of ground: (1) Dispersive ground; (2) facile ground; (3) contentious ground; (4) open ground; (5) ground of intersecting highways; (6) serious ground; (7) difficult ground; (8) hemmed-in ground; (9) desperate ground.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“إن كنت تعلم قدراتك وقدرات خصمك, فما عليك أن تخشى من نتائج مئة معركة. وإن كنت تعرف قدرات نفسك, وتجهل قدرات خصمك, فلسوف تعاني من هزيمة ما في كل نصر مُكتسب. أما إن كنت تجهل قدرات نفسك, وتجهل قدرات عدوك... فالهزيمة المؤكدة هي حليفك في كل معركة !”
سون تزو, The Art of War
“The skillful employer of men will employ the wise man, the brave man, the covetous man, and the stupid man. For the wise man delights in establishing his merit, the brave man likes to show his courage in action, the covetous man is quick at seizing advantages, and the stupid man has no fear of death."]”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“At first, then, exhibit the coyness of a maiden,  until the enemy gives you an opening; afterwards emulate the rapidity of a running hare, and it will be too late for the enemy to oppose you.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“You can be sure of succeeding in your attacks if you only attack places which are undefended.You can ensure the safety of your defence if you only hold positions that cannot be attacked.”
Ralph D. Sawyer, The Art of War
“Thus, what enables the wise sovereign and the good general to strike and conquer, and achieve things beyond the reach of ordinary men, is foreknowledge.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Sun Tzu said: In the practical art of war, the best thing of all is to take the enemy's country whole and intact; to shatter and destroy it is not so good. So, too, it is better to capture an army entire than to destroy it, to capture a regiment, a detachment or a company entire than to destroy them.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“and addressed them thus: “I presume you know the difference between front and back, right hand and left hand?”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“You can be sure of succeeding in your attacks if you only attack places which are undefended.You can ensure the safety of your defense if you only hold positions that cannot be attacked.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Thus, though we have heard of stupid haste in war, cleverness has never been seen associated with long delays.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“When an invading force crosses a river in its onward march, do not advance to meet it in mid-stream.  It will be best to let half the army get across, and then deliver your attack.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“On open ground, do not try to block the enemy's way. On the ground of intersecting highways, join hands with your allies.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“If we wish to fight, the enemy can be forced to an engagement even though he be sheltered behind a high rampart and a deep ditch. All we need do is attack some other place that he will be obliged to relieve.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Sun Tzu said: The art of war is of vital importance to the State.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“All warfare is based on deception.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“15. In war, practice dissimulation, and you will succeed.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“When you engage in actual fighting, if victory is long in coming, then men's weapons will grow dull and their ardour will be damped. If you lay siege to a town, you will exhaust your strength.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“He wins his battles by making no mistakes.
Making no mistakes is what establishes the certainty of victory, for it means conquering an enemy that is already defeated.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“A leader leads by example not by force.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War
“Appear at points which the enemy must hasten to defend; march swiftly to places where you are not expected.”
Sun Tzu, The Art of War