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American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House by Jon Meacham
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American Lion Quotes Showing 1-29 of 29
“Always take all the time to reflect that circumstances permit, but when the time for action has come, stop thinking. (Andrew Jackson)”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“Jackson was a transformative president in part because he had a transcendent personality; other presidents who followed him were not transformative, and served unremarkably.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“Or, as Jackson would have said: The people, sir-the people will set things right.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“Jackson lead as he lived, sometimes with his heart, sometimes with his mind, sometimes with both.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“politics is brutal because it engages the most fundamental human impulses for affection, honor, power, and fame. Great principles and grand visions are ennobling, but at its best politics is an imperfect means to an altruistic end.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“Steadiness of faith, was, in the long run, as illuminating and essential as sophistication of thought.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“With a writer's eye, Irving detected Jackson's depths. "As his admirers say, he is truly an old Roman-to which I would add, with a little dash of the Greek; for I suspect he is as knowing as I believe he is honest.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“Politics was at once clinical and human, driven by principles and passions that he (the leader) had to master and harness for the good of the whole.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“In rich and captivating prose, Jessica DuLong kindly invites the rest of us on the journey of her lifetime: from a dot-com job to the fabled waters of the Hudson River, where she became a fireboat engineer. This is an unusual and fascinating book.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“He was the most contradictory of men. A champion of extending freedom and democracy to even the poorest of whites, Jackson was an unrepentant slaveholder. A sentimental man who rescued an Indian orphan on a battlefield to raise in his home, Jackson was responsible for the removal of Indian tribes from their ancestral lands. An enemy of Eastern financial elites and a relentless opponent of the Bank of the United States, which he believed to be a bastion of corruption, Jackson also promised to die, if necessary, to preserve the power and prestige of the central government. Like us and our America, Jackson and his America achieved great things while committing grievous sins.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“I believe after a series of years that no government that has the power to collect taxes and declare war, can be restrained but by a display of sufficient power to break it up,” Pickens said.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“A contemporary recalled that when Emily’s children and, later, those of Sarah Jackson, Andrew Jackson, Jr.’s wife, were infants and became “restless and fretful at night, the President, hearing the mother moving about with her little one, would often rise, dress himself, and insist upon having the child, with whom he would walk the floor by the hour, soothing it in his strong, tender arms, while he urged the tired mother to get some rest.” At White House meals, Jackson wanted the family’s youngsters to dine at the table with him: they were not to be kept in the kitchen or nursery, but at the center of the household.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“The opposition continued to fear Jackson’s mysterious power over so many people. “His administration is absolutely odious, and yet there is an adherence to the man,” John Sergeant, a former congressman from Pennsylvania, wrote to Clay. “It remains to be seen whether this will not yield to the conviction that his continuance must be destructive of everything that is worthy to be cherished.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“It is to be regretted that the rich and powerful too often bend the acts of government to their selfish purposes,”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“Half a world away, on the same Friday, the Chamber of Deputies in France opened debate on paying the United States a debt of 25 million francs (about $5 million) as an indemnity for French damage to American shipping during the Napoleonic wars. France had agreed to pay the money under an 1831 treaty, but after four days of consideration, by a margin of eight, France declined to honor its obligations.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“have apparent confidence in all, real confidence in none, until from actual experience it is found that the individual is worthy of it—from this rule I have never departed.… When I have found men mere politicians, bending to the popular breeze and changing with it, for the self-popularity, I have ever shunned them, believing that they were unworthy of my confidence—but still treat them with hospitality and politeness.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“Washington. In Monroe’s Cabinet, Secretary of”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“what I believe true dignity consists, that is to say, honesty, propriety of conduct, and honest independence.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“when the laws undertake to add to these natural and just advantages artificial distinctions, to grant titles, gratuities, and exclusive privileges, to make the rich richer and the potent more powerful, the humble members of society—the farmers, mechanics, and laborers—who have neither the time nor the means of securing like favors to themselves, have a right to complain of the injustice of their Government.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“People who believe they are valued and set apart in the mind of a leader are less likely to be implacable foes. Jackson knew that both men and massive, impersonal forces shaped nations, and he was determined to use his own personality to, if not convert, then at least charm those who shaped the climate of opinion in which he was to govern. Hence the sweetness to the Smiths on their first visit and the calls on Mrs. Randolph: better to keep the establishment close, or at least off guard, than to alienate it altogether. The fact of a president’s power and the White House itself are the most formidable weapons on the field. It”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“cold which threw me back a little.” As the weather grew warmer, she hoped to come home but was uncertain when they might be able to; politics was too consuming. “I do not know yet what we shall do this summer about going to Tennessee as Congress has not adjourned and [there is] no prospect of it soon. Uncle says we must go, if only to stay ten days.…” Jackson’s eagerness to escape Washington was understandable. A tariff reform bill was wending its way”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“Six days later, the president named a postmaster for New Salem, Illinois, a twenty-four-year-old lawyer who had lost a race for the state legislature. He was a Clay man, but the post was hardly major, and Abraham Lincoln was happy to accept the appointment.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“You can make friends by being honest, and you can keep them by being steadfast. You must keep in mind that friends worth having will in the long run expect as much from you as they give to you.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“George Washington was the first and greatest such example, a man called to power not only because of his views but also for his reassuring bearing. He was a man with whom the people felt comfortable. Jackson’s political appeal came out of the same tradition—a tradition in which a leader creates a covenant of mutual confidence between himself and the broader public.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“the people are intelligent, the people are just, and in time these characteristics must have an effect on their Representatives.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“When I have found men mere politicians, bending to the popular breeze and changing with it, for the self-popularity, I have ever shunned them, believing that they were unworthy of my confidence—but still treat them with hospitality and politeness.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“Jackson understood that he was expending precious political capital and untold hours battling for the Eatons’ full acceptance into Washington society, but he was doing it less for Margaret than for her husband, for whom he held genuine regard and whose good sense appears to have extended to every aspect of public life except for his own marriage.   THE”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“presidential campaign between Jackson and Adams had been vicious. Jackson’s forces had charged that Adams, as minister to Russia, had procured a woman for Czar Alexander I. As president, Adams was alleged to have spent too much public money decorating the White House, buying fancy china and a billiard table. The anti-Jackson assaults were more colorful. Jackson’s foes called his wife a bigamist and his mother a whore, attacking him for a history of dueling, for alleged atrocities in battles against the British, the Spanish, and the Indians—and for being a wife stealer who had married Rachel before she”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
“His larger argument was that a president should not simply defer to the will and wishes of the Congress or the judiciary. Instead, Jackson was saying, the president ought to take his own stand on important issues, giving voice as best he could to the interests of the people at large.”
Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House