Knots and Crosses Quotes

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Knots and Crosses (Inspector Rebus, #1) Knots and Crosses by Ian Rankin
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Knots and Crosses Quotes Showing 1-21 of 21
“It was the laughter of birthdays, of money found in an old pocket.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“His eyes beheld beauty not in reality but in the printed word. Standing in the waiting-room, he realized that in his life he had accepted secondary experience -- the experience of reading someone else's thoughts -- over real life. ”
Ian Rankin, Knots & Crosses
“...trapped in limbo, believing in a lack of belief, but not necessarily lacking the belief to believe.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“Rebus reminded himself to stop praying. Perhaps if he stopped praying, God would take the hint and stop being such a bastard to one of his few believers on this near-godforsaken planet.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“My father was a slave to capitalist ideology. He didn't know what he was doing."
"You mean you went to an expensive school?”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“Was it all inevitable, John?" Reeve was pushing his fingers across the floor of the cell, seated on his haunches. I was lying on the mattress.

Yes," I said. "I think it was. Certainly, it's written that way. The end of the book is there before the beginning's hardly started.”
Ian Rankin, Knots & Crosses
“Often he declined invitations, because to accept meant that he had to dust off his brogues, iron a shirt, brush down his best suit, take a bath, and splash on some cologne. He had also to be affable, to drink and be merry, to talk to strangers with whom he had no inclination to talk and with whom he was not being paid to talk. In other words, he resented having to play the part of a normal human animal.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“Strangulation. It was a fearful way to go, wrestling, kicking your way towards oblivion, panic, the fretful sucking for air, and the killer behind you most likely, so that you faced the fear of something totally anonymous, a death without knowledge of who or why. Rebus had been taught methods of killing in the SAS. He knew what it felt like to have the garotte tighten on your neck, trusting to the opponent’s prevailing sanity. A fearful way to go.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“all eyes turned towards him, entered the”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“Job, actually. I read it once a long time ago. It seems more frightening now though. The man who begins to doubt, who shouts out against his God, looking for a response, and who gets one. ‘God gave the world to the wicked,’ he says at one point, and ‘Why should I bother?’ at another.” “It sounds interesting. But he goes on bothering?” “Yes, that’s the incredible thing.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“He felt his arms ache and, looking down, saw that the girl had stopped struggling. There came that point, that sudden, blissful point, when it was useless to go on living, and when the mind and body came to accept that such was the case. That was a beautiful, peaceful moment, the most relaxed moment of one’s life.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“It seemed to Rebus that the more expensive something was, the less of it there always seemed to be: tiny little hi-fi systems, watches without numbers, the translucent Dior ankle-socks on Michael’s feet.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“Fifteen years, and all he had to show were an amount of self-pity and a busted marriage with an innocent daughter hanging between them. It was more disgusting than sad.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“No sooner had he finished with a case than another two or three appeared in its place. What was the name of that creature? The Hydra, was it? That was what he was fighting. Every time he cut off a head, more popped into his in-tray. Coming back from a holiday was a nightmare. And now they were giving him rocks to push up hills as well.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“Ah, but it was not a nice world this, not a nice world at all. It was an Old Testament land that he found himself in, a land of barbarity and retribution.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“Poor girl. She would change. The idealism would vanish once she saw how hypocritical the whole game was, and what luxuries lay outside university. When she left, she’d want it all: the executive job in London, the flat, car, salary, wine-bar. She would chuck it all in for a slice of pie.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“Nothing in the room was cheap, but none of it was exactly desirable either.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“Also, he was more discriminating now than he had been then, back in the old days when he would read a book to its bitter end whether he liked it or not. These days, a book he disliked was unlikely to last ten pages of his concentration.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“Perhaps if he stopped praying, God would take the hint and stop being such a bastard to one of his few believers on this near-godforsaken planet.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“Rebus remembered that the premature withdrawal of the penis during intercourse for contraceptive reasons was often referred to as ‘getting off at Haymarket.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses
“There was a ring at the door. He did not answer. They would go away, and he would be alone again with his grief, his impotent anger, and his undusted possessions.”
Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses