My First Summer in the Sierra Quotes

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My First Summer in the Sierra My First Summer in the Sierra by John Muir
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My First Summer in the Sierra Quotes (showing 1-23 of 23)
“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“Another glorious Sierra day in which one seems to be dissolved and absorbed and sent pulsing onward we know not where. Life seems neither long nor short, and we take no more heed to save time or make haste than do the trees and stars. This is true freedom, a good practical sort of immortality.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“Another glorious day, the air as delicious to the lungs as nectar to the tongue.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“This time it is real — all must die, and where could mountaineer find a more glorious death!”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“Nothing truly wild is unclean.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“A few minutes ago every tree was excited, bowing to the roaring storm, waving, swirling, tossing their branches in glorious enthusiasm like worship. But though to the outer ear these trees are now silent, their songs never cease.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us. Our flesh-and-bone tabernacle seems transparent as glass to the beauty about us, as if truly an inseparable part of it, thrilling with the air and trees, streams and rocks, in the waves of the sun,—a part of all nature, neither old nor young, sick nor well, but immortal.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“Every morning, arising from the death of sleep, the happy plants and all our fellow animal creatures great and small, and even the rocks, seemed to be shouting, "Awake, awake, rejoice, rejoice, come love us and join in our song. Come! Come!”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“Beauty beyond thought everywhere, beneath, above, made and being made forever.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“Our flesh-and-bone tabernacle seems transparent as glass to the beauty about us, as if truly an inseparable part of it, thrilling with the air and trees, streams and rocks, in the waves of the sun,—part of all nature, neither old nor young, sick nor well, but immortal.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“An eagle soaring above a sheer cliff, where I suppose its nest is, makes another striking show of life, and helps to bring to mind the other people of the so-called solitude—deer in the forest caring for their young; the strong, well-clad, well-fed bears; the lively throng of squirrels; the blessed birds, great and small, stirring and sweetening the groves; and the clouds of happy insects filling the sky with joyous hum as part and parcel of the down-pouring sunshine.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“It seems supernatural, but only because it is not understood.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
tags: nature
“Another glorious day, the air as delicious to the lungs as nectar to the tongue; indeed the body seems one palate, and tingles equally throughout.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“learn to live like the wild animals,”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“I tied a crust of bread to my belt, and with Carlo set out for the upper slopes of the Pilot Peak Ridge, and had a good day, notwithstanding the care of seeking the silly runaways.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“longing for the mountains”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“take me into the mountains”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“Anche oggi tempo splendido, una di quelle gloriose giornate della Sierra in cui ci si sente come dissolti, assorbiti, spinti innanzi pulsanti, non si sa dove. La vita non pare né lunga né breve, non ci si preoccupa di risparmiare tempo o di affrettarsi più di quanto facciano alberi e stelle. Questa è la vera libertà, un buon surrogato mortale dell'immortalità.”
John Muir, My First Summer in The Sierra
“Ci sono anche alcuni ginepri (Juniperus occidentalis) piccoli e tozzi, dalla corteccia color cannella e il fogliame grigio, che se ne stanno per lo più solitari, aggrappati alla pietra battuta dal sole, al sicuro dal fuoco: gran montanaro, quest'albero, robusto, resistente a tutte le interperie, si nutre di sole e di neve e con questa dieta riesce a mantenersi in buona salute anche per un migliaio d'anni.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“Having escaped restraint, they were, like some people we know of, afraid of their freedom, did not know what to do with it, and seemed glad to get back into the old familiar bondage.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“The deeper the solitude the less the sense of loneliness, and the nearer our friends.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra
“Contemplando il rivestimento di merletto che i torrenti disegnano sulle montagne non si può non rammentare che ogni cosa fluisce, ogni cosa si muove verso un qualche punto, gli esseri viventi e le rocce così dette inanimate come l'acqua.
Fluisce la neve, rapida o lenta, nelle valanghe e nei ghiacciai creatori di bellezza; fluisce l'aria in maestose inondazioni che trasportano minerali e foglie, semi e spore, torrenti di musiche e di profumi; fluisce l'acqua trasportando rocce, in soluzione o in forma di fango, sabbia, ciottoli, sassi. Fluiscono le rocce dalla bocca dei vulcani, come acque dalle fonti e gli animali si raggruppano ed è tutto un fluire, un avanzare di zampe, di groppe in salto, d'ali spiegate, sulla terra, nell'aria, nel mare... E intanto le stelle corrono nello spazio spinte dal perenne pulsare, come globuli rossi nel caldo sangue della Natura.”
John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra