Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch Quotes

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Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch by Henry Miller
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Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch Quotes Showing 1-23 of 23
“If we are always arriving and departing, it is also
true that we are eternally anchored. One's destination
is never a place but rather a new way of looking at things.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“Surely every one realizes, at some point along the way, that he is capable of living a far better life than the one he has chosen.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“Certainly paradise, whatever, wherever it be, contains flaws. (Paradisical flaws, if you like.) If it did not, it would be incapable of drawing the hearts of men or angels.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“Out yonder they may curse, revile, and torture one another, defile all the human instincts, make a shambles of creation (if it were in their power), but here, no, here, it is unthinkable, here there is abiding peace, the peace of God, and the serene security created by a handful of good neighbors living at one with the creature world.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“We create our fate everyday”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“Surely every one realizes, at some point along the way, that he is capable of living a far better life than the one he has chosen. What stays him, usually, is the fear of the sacrifices involved. (Even to relinquish his chains seems like a sacrifice.) yet everyone knows that nothing is accomplished without sacrifice.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“And no one sets about saving the world unless he has first experienced the miracle of personal salvation.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“Sweet or bitter, I am now convinced that all experience is enriching and rewarding. Above all, instructive.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“She discovered what others know only too well in a cynical way, that people prefer to believe in and worship a god who is remote rather than live out the godlike nature which is their inherent being.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“If it be knowledge or wisdom one is seeking, then one had better go direct to the source. And the source is not the scholar or philosopher, not the master, saint, or teacher, but life itself - direct experience of life. The same is true for art. Here, too, we an dispense with "the masters.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“The ideal community, in a sense, would be the loose, fluid aggregation of individuals who elected to be alone and detached in order to be at one with themselves and all that lives and breathes. It would be a God-filled community, even if none of its members believe in (a) God. It would be a paradise, even though the word had long disappeared from our vocabulary.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“Surely every one realizes, at some point along the way, that he is capable of living a far better life than the one he has chose. What stays him, usually, is the fear of the sacrifices involved. (Even to relinquish his chains seems like a sacrifice.) Yet everyone knows that nothing is accomplished without sacrifice.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“. . . They had skies of pure azure and walls of fog moving in and out of the canyons with invisible feet, hills in winter of emerald green and in summer mountain upon mountain of pure gold. They had even more, for there was ever the unfathomable silence of the forest, the blazing immensity of the Pacific, days drenched with sun and nights spangled with stars. . .”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“There is one other thing to know … when you have expressed yourself to the fullest, then and only then will it dawn upon you that everything has already been expressed, not in words alone but in deed, and that all you need really do is say Amen!”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“No, we are never alone. But one has to live apart to know it for the truth.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“This is the lone-American type I admire, the kind I believe in, can get along with, and whom I vote for even though he’s never nominated for office. The democratic man our poets sang of but who, alas, is being rapidly exterminated, along with the buffalo, the moose and the elk, the great bear, the eagle, the condor, the mountain lion. The sort of American that never starts a war, never raises a feud, never draws the color line, never tries to lord it over his fellow-man, never yearns for higher education, never holds a grudge against his neighbor, never treats an artist shabbily and never turns a beggar away. Often untutored and unlettered, he sometimes has more of the poet and the musician in him, philosopher too, than those who are acclaimed as such. His whole way of life is aesthetic. What marks him as different, sometimes ridiculous, is his serenity and originality. That he aspires to be none other than himself, is this not the essence of wisdom?”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“Between laughs I could hear my mother’s words ringing in my ears. “Why don't you write something that will sell?”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“Paradise or no paradise, I have the very definite impression that the people of this vicinity are striving to live up to the grandeur and nobility which is such an integral part of the setting. They behave as if it were a privilege to live here, as if it were by an act of grace they found themselves here. The place itself is so overwhelmingly bigger, greater, than anyone could hope to make it that it engenders a humility and reverence not frequently met with in Americans. There is nothing to improve on in the surroundings, the tendency is to set about improving oneself.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“If it was a mistake not to finish school (it wasn't!), it was an even worse mistake to go to work. ("Work! The word was so painful he couldn't bring himself to pronounce it," says a character in one of Cossery's books.) Until I was almost eighteen I had know freedom, a relative freedom, which is more than most people ever get to know. (It included "freedom of speech," which has hung over into my writing.) Then, like an idiot, I entered the lists. Overnight, as it were, the bit was put in my mouth, I was saddled, and the cruel rowels were dug into my tender flanks. It didn't take long to realize what a shithouse I had let myself into. Every new job I took was a step further in the direction of "murder, death and blight." I think of them still as prisons, whorehouses, lunatic asylums: the Atlas Portland Cement Co., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Bureau of Economic Research, the Charles Williams Mail Order House, the Western Union Telegraph Co., etc. To think that I wasted ten years of my life serving these anonymous lords and masters! That look of rapture in Pookie's eyes, that look of supreme admiration which I reserved for such as Eddie Carney, Lester Reardon, Johnny Paul: it was gone, lost, buried. It returned only when, much later, I reached the point where I was completely cut off, thoroughly destitute, utterly abandoned. When I became the nameless one, wandering as a mendicant through the streets of my own home town. Then I began to see again, to look with eyes of wonder, eyes of love, into the eyes of my fellow-man.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“Anyway, in the interim since I turned writer—a good thirty years—I have hobnobbed with all varieties of man, from the highest to the lowest. I have know intimately saints and seers as well as those whom we disdainfully refer to as "the dregs of humanity." I don't know to which group I am more indebted. But I do know this—if we were suddenly faced with an overwhelming calamity, if I had to choose just one man with whom I would share the rest of my life in the midst of chaos and destruction, I would pick that unknown Mexican peon whom my friend Doner brought one day to clear the weeds in our garden. I no longer remember his name, for he was truly without name.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“No one is born an artist. One elects for it! And when you elect to be the first and last among men you find nothing strange about sleeping with a donkey, putting your paws in the garbage pail, or swallowing reproaches and insults from all the near and dear ones who regard your way of life as a grave mistake.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“If you do not know where you are going, any road will take you there.”*”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
“Artists never thrive in colonies.”
Henry Miller, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch