The Schopenhauer Cure Quotes

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The Schopenhauer Cure The Schopenhauer Cure by Irvin D. Yalom
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The Schopenhauer Cure Quotes Showing 1-30 of 76
“Life is a miserable thing. I have decided to spend my life thinking about it.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“Religion has everything on its side: revelation, prophecies, government protection, the highest dignity and eminence. . . and more than this, the invaluable prerogative of being allowed to imprint its doctrines on the mind at a tender age of childhood, whereby they become almost innate ideas.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“Live right, he reminded himself, and have faith that good things will flow from you even if you never learn of them.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“The flower replied: You fool! Do you imagine I blossom in order to be seen? I blossom for my own sake because it pleases me, and not for the sake of others. My joy consists in my being and my blossoming.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“And what is the most terrible thing about boredom? Why do we rush to dispel it? Because it is a distraction-free state which soon enough reveals underlying unpalatable truths about existence—our insignificance, our meaningless existence, our inexorable progression to deterioration and death.”
Irvin Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“If we look at life in its small details, how ridiculous it all seems. It is like a drop of water seen through a microscope, a single drop teeming with protozoa. How we laugh as they bustle about so eagerly and struggle with one another. Whether here, or in the little span of human life, this terrible activity produces a comic effect”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
tags: life
“He who would be everything cannot be anything.”)”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“A person of high, rare mental gifts who is forced into a job which is merely useful is like a valuable vase decorated with the most beautiful painting and then used as a kitchen pot.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“It has often been noted that three major revolutions in thought have threatened the idea of human centrality. First, Copernicus demonstrated that Earth was not the center about which all celestial bodies revolved. Next, Darwin showed us that we were not central in the chain of life but, like all other creatures, had evolved from other life-forms. Third, Freud demonstrated that we are not masters in our own house-that much of our behavior is governed by forced outside of our consciousness. There is no doubt that Freud’s unacknowledged co-revolutionary was Arthur Schopenhauer, who, long before Freud’s birth, had posited that we are governed by deep biological forced and then delude ourselves into thinking that we consciously choose our activities.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“Nietzsche’s message to us was to live life in such a way that we would be willing to repeat the same life eternally.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“We should treat with indulgence every human folly, failing, and vice, bearing in mind that what we have before us are simply our own failings, follies, and vices. For they are just the failings of mankind to which we also belong and accordingly we have all the same failings buried within ourselves. We should not be indignant with others for these vices simply because they do not appear in us at the moment.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“The obsession is a distraction; it protects you from thinking about something else,”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“The freedom of an unscheduled afternoon brought confusion rather than joy. Julius had always been focused. When he was not seeing patients, other important projects and activities-writing, teaching, tennis, research-clamored for his attention. But today nothing seemed important. He suspected that nothing had ever been important, that his mind had arbitrarily imbued projects with importance and then cunningly covered its traces. Today he saw through the ruse of a lifetime. Today there was nothing important to do, and he ambled aimlessly down Union Street.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“The greatest wisdom is to make the enjoyment of the present the supreme object of life because that is the only reality; all else being the play of thought. But it might as well be our greatest folly because that which exists only a moment and vanishes as a dream can never be worth a serious effort.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“Some cannot loosen their own chains yet can nonetheless liberate their friends. —Nietzsche”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“When, at the end of their lives, most men look back they will find that they have lived throughout ad interim. They will be surprised to see that the very thing they allowed to slip by unappreciated and unenjoyed was just their life. And so a man, having been duped by hope, dances into the arms of death.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“Some said living with cancer had made them wiser, more self-realized, while others had reordered their priorities in life, grown stronger, learned to say no to activities they no longer valued and yes to things that really mattered—such as loving their family and friends, observing the beauty about them, savoring the changing seasons.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“No rose without a thorn. But many a thorn without a rose.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“At the end of his life, no man, if he be sincere and in possession of his faculties, would ever wish to go though it again. Rather than this, he will much prefer to choose complete nonexistence.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“Every breath we draw wards off the death that constantly impinges on us…. Ultimately death must triumph, for by birth it has already become our lot and it plays with its prey only for a short while before swallowing it up. However, we continue our life with great interest and much solicitude as long as possible, just as we blow out a soap-bubble as long and as large as possible, although with the perfect certainty that it will burst.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
tags: death, life
“It's not ideas, nor vision, nor tools that truly matter in therapy. If you debrief patients at the end of therapy about the process, what do they remember? Never the ideas—it's always the relationship.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“If we do not want to be a plaything in the hands of every rogue and the object of every fool’s ridicule, the first rule is to be reserved and inaccessible.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
tags: wisdom
“(...) Arthur ne aminteşte adesea (şi lui însuşi) că emoţia are puterea de a ascunde şi de a falsifica cunoaşterea; că lumea întreagă capătă un aspect senin atunci când avem motive să ne bucurăm şi unul întunecat şi posomorât atunci când ne copleşeşte părerea de rău”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“marriage a debt that is contracted in youth and paid in old age….”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“Life is a miserable thing. I have decided to spend my life thinking about it.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“Were you really, truly, helpful to your patients? Maybe you've just learned to pick patients who were going to improve on their own anyway.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“Absolutely, bring any kind of carrot cake you wish.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“The monuments, the ideas left behind by beings like me are my greatest pleasure in life. Without books I would long ago have been in despair.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“Religion has everything on its side: revelation, prophecies, government protection, the highest dignity and eminence...and more than this, the invaluable prerogative of being allowed to imprint its doctrines on the mind at a tender age of childhood, whereby they become almost innate ideas.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure
“Could we foresee it, there are times when children might seem like innocent prisoners condemned not to death but to life and as yet all too unconscious of what their sentence means. Nevertheless every man desires to reach old age…a state of life of which it may be said “it is bad today, and every day it will get worse, until the worst of all happens.”
Irvin D. Yalom, The Schopenhauer Cure

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