Coming Home to Myself Quotes

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Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body and Soul Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body and Soul by Marion Woodman
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Coming Home to Myself Quotes Showing 1-11 of 11
“There is no growth without real feeling. Children not loved for who they are do not learn how to love themselves. Their growth is an exercise in pleasing others, not in expanding through experience. As adults, they must learn to nurture their own lost child.”
Marion Woodman, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body and Soul
“If we could allow the pace of our meetings to slow down to the pace of our hearts, we might find genuine understanding.”
Marion Woodman, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body and Soul
“Only by discovering and loving the goddess lost within our rejected body can we hear our own authentic voice.”
Marion Woodman, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body and Soul
“Old Mother God, Old Father God— they keep us trapped. And we do give up. We pull the covers over our head, and go back to sleep. Only to dream of old dragons, old alligators, old crocodiles drinking our blood. To dream of cold-eyed lawmakers saying, This is the way it's always been done. It works. It will stay this way. And you will obey.”
Marion Woodman, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body & Soul
“She dreams she is in a glass coffin. From her prison, details have beauty. In her aloneness, she imagines emotions. Her husband is the perfect bridegroom, the trickster, the small boy looking for mother. She is goddess and mirror, siren and friend, femme fatale and sacrificing wife. He is attracted to her girlhood purity, her desire to sacrifice, to serve. At first he may be flattered: she sees him as a god.”
Marion Woodman, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body & Soul
“Children not loved for who they are do not learn how to love themselves. Their growth is an exercise in pleasing others, not in expanding through experience. As adults, they must learn to nurture their own lost child. There's personal anger, but underneath there's often universal rage; And when we are possessed, God help the man who's on the end of that. Deep rage is not about the man; Deep rage is this: Nobody ever saw me. Nobody ever heard me. As long as I can remember, I've had to perform. When I tried to be myself, I was told, That's not what you think, that's not what you ought to do. So, just like my mother and her mother, I put on a false face. My life became a lie. That's deep rage. We have lived our lives behind a mask. Sooner or later —if we are lucky— the mask will be smashed. What a relief to be human instead of the god or goddess my parents imagined me to be or I imagined them.”
Marion Woodman, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body & Soul
“Recognizing the difference between power and love is difficult if we were raised in a home where power was disguised as love.”
Marion Woodman, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body & Soul
“A man may be shocked when he sees you've really changed. He thought you'd been scribbling in your journal —a sentimental, little Victorian girl writing in your little book, naive and uninitiated. Suddenly, when you say, Look, this is what I think, he can't believe what's coming out of your mouth. Mother puts up with anything. Mother is unconditional love. When you say, See me as I am, you are no longer mother, no longer his ideal woman. You've changed. He thought you'd been scribbling in your journal.”
Marion Woodman, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body & Soul
“How does it feel to say no to the one man to whom you have always said yes? How does it feel when you stand up to him and reject all he has never questioned?”
Marion Woodman, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body & Soul
“Healing needs listening with the inner ear, stopping the incessant blather, listening.”
Marion Woodman, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body & Soul
“Can I really believe I am worth an hour a day? Am I, who have given my life to others, selfish enough to take one hour a day to find myself?”
Marion Woodman, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body & Soul