Miracles Quotes

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Miracles Miracles by C.S. Lewis
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Miracles Quotes (showing 1-29 of 29)
“Miracles do not, in fact, break the laws of nature.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“In Science we have been reading only the notes to a poem; in Christianity we find the poem itself.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“An 'impersonal God'-well and good. A subjective God of beauty, truth and goodness, inside our own heads-better still. A formless life-force surging through us, a vast power which we can tap-best of all. But God himself, alive, pulling at the other end of the cord, perhaps approaching at an infinite speed, the hunter, King, husband-that is quite another matter.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“For this reason, the question whether miracles occur can never be answered simply by experience. Every event which might claim to be a miracle is, in the last resort, something presented to our senses, something seen, heard, touched, smelled or tasted. And our senses are not infallible. If anything extraordinary seems to have happened, we can always say that we have been the victims of an illusion. If we hold a philosophy which excludes the supernatural, this is what we always shall say. What we learn from experience depends on the kind of philosophy we bring to experience. It is therefore useless to appeal to experience before we have settled, as well as we can, the philosophical question.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“He is not the soul of Nature, nor any part of Nature. He inhabits eternity: He dwells in a high and holy place: heaven is His throne, not his vehicle, earth is his footstool, not his vesture. One day he will dismantle both and make a new heaven and earth. He is not to be identified even with the 'divine spark' in man. He is 'God and not man.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“It is a profound mistake to imagine that Christianity ever intended to dissipate the bewilderment and even the terror, the sense of our own nothingness, which come upon us when we think about the nature of things. It comes to intensify them. Without such sensations there is no religion. Many a man, brought up in the glib profession of some shallow form of Christianity, who comes through reading Astronomy to realize for the first time how majestically indifferent most reality is to man, and who perhaps abandons his religion on that account, may at that moment be having his first genuinely religious experience. . . . Christianity does not involve the belief that all things were made for man.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“There comes a moment when people who have been dabbling in religion ('man's search for God'!) suddenly draw back. Supposing we really found Him? We never meant it to come to that! Worse still, supposing He had found us?”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“Death and resurrection are what the story is about and had we but eyes to see it, this has been hinted on every page, met us, in some disguise, at every turn, and even been muttered in conversations between such minor characters (if they are minor characters) as the vegetables.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“We find ourselves in a world of transporting pleasures, ravishing beauties, and tantalising possibilities, but all constantly being destroyed, all coming to nothing. Nature has all the air of a good thing spoiled.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“Nothing can seem extraordinary until you have discovered what is ordinary. Belief in miracles, far from depending on an ignorance of the laws of nature, is only possible in so far as those laws are known.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“It is much less important that the doctrine itself should be fully comprehensible. We believe that the sun is in the sky at midday in summer not because we can clearly see the sun (in fact, we cannot) but because we can see everything else.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“[Death] is a safety-device because, once Man has fallen, natural immortality would be the one utterly hopeless destiny for him.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
tags: death
“A naturalistic Christianity leaves out all that is specifically Christian.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“Sexual intercourse is rapidly becoming the one thing venerated in a world without veneration.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“If anything is to exist at all, then the Original Thing must be, not a principle nor a generality, much less an ‘ideal’ or a ‘value’, but an utterly concrete fact.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“Jaweh is clearly not a Nature-God. He does not die and come to life each year as a true Corn-king should. He may give wine and fertility, but must not be worshipped with Bacchanalian or aphrodisiac rites.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“All possible knowledge, then, depends on the validity of reasoning...Unless human reasoning is valid no science can be true.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“Unless human reasoning is valid no science can be true.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“The miracle of the Resurrection, and the theology of that miracle, comes first: the biography comes later as a comment on it.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“That hierarchical inequality, the need for self surrender, the willing sacrifice of self to others, hold sway in the realm beyond Nature. It is indeed only love that makes the difference: all those very same principles which are evil in the world of selfishness and necessity are good in the world of love and understanding.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“If God annihilates or deflects or creates a unit of matter, He has created a new situation at that point. Immediately nature domiciles this new situation, makes it at home in her realm, adapts all other events to it. It finds itself conforming to all the laws. If God creates a miraculous spermatozoon in the body of a virgin, it does not proceed to break any laws. The laws at once take over. Nature is ready. Pregnancy follows, according to all the normal laws, and nine months later a child is born”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“If God annihilates or creates or deflects a unit of matter, He has created a new situation at that point. Immediately all nature domiciles this new situation, makes it at home in her realm, adapts all other events to it. It finds itself conforming to all the laws. If God creates a miraculous spermatozoon in the body of a virgin, it does not proceed to break any laws. The laws at once take over. Nature is ready. Pregnancy follows, according to all the normal laws, and nine months later a child is born.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles
“Almost the whole of Christian theology could perhaps be deduced from the two facts (a) That men make coarse jokes, and (b) That they feel the dead to be uncanny. The”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“What we know through laws and general principles is a series of connections. But in order for there to be a real universe the connections must be given something to connect;”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“Most baffling of all to a modern literalist, the God who seems to live locally in the sky, also made it.”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“The Christian doctrines, and even the Jewish doctrines which preceded them, have always been statements about spiritual reality, not specimens of primitive physical science. Whatever”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“All the essentials of Hinduism would, I think, remain unimpaired if you subtracted the miraculous, and the same is almost true of Mohammedanism. But you cannot do that with Christianity. It is precisely the story of a great Miracle. A naturalistic Christianity leaves out all that is specifically Christian. The”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“For images, of the one kind or of the other, will come; we cannot jump off our own shadow. As”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study
“If the universe is teeming with life other than ours, then this, we are told, makes it quite ridiculous to believe that God should be so concerned with the human race as to ‘come down from Heaven’ and be made man for its redemption. If, on the other hand, our planet is really unique in harbouring organic life, then this is thought to prove that life is only an accidental by-product in the universe and so again to disprove our religion. We”
C.S. Lewis, Miracles: A Preliminary Study

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