Mythology Quotes

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Mythology Mythology by Edith Hamilton
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Mythology Quotes Showing 1-30 of 58
“Love cannot live where there is no trust.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“Love, however, cannot be forbidden. The more that flame is covered up, the hotter it burns. Also love can always find a way. It was impossible that these two whose hearts were on fire should be kept apart. (Pyramus and Thisbe)”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“The mind knows only what lies near the heart.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“The power of good is shown not by triumphantly conquering evil, but by continuing to resist evil while facing certain defeat.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“...a chasm opened in the earth and out of it coal-black horses sprang, drawing a chariot and driven by one who had a look of dark splendor, majestic and beautiful and terrible. He caught her to him and held her close. The next moment she was being borne away from the radiance of earth in springtime to the world of the dead by the king who rules it.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“Love and the Soul (for that is what Psyche means) had sought and, after sore trials, found each other; and that union could never be broken. (Cupid and Psyche)”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“None so good that he has no faults, None so wicked that he is worth naught.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“Moderately wise each one should be,
Not overwise, for a wise man's heart
Is seldom glad (Norse Wisdom)”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“He drew iron tears down Pluto's cheek and make Hell grant what Love did seek. ”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“Tell one your thoughts, but beware of two. All know what is known to three”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“He was there beside her; yet she was far away from him, alone with her outraged love and her ruined life.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“For all men serve him of their own free will. And he whom Love touches not walks in darkness.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“One good thing, however, was there - Hope. It was the only good thing the casket had held among the many evils, and it remains to this day mankind's sole comfort in misfortune.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“They yoked themselves to a car and drew her all the long way through dust and heat. Everyone admired their filial piety when they arrived and the proud and happy mother standing before the statue prayed that Hera would reward them by giving them the best gift in her power. As she finished her prayer the two lads sank to the ground. They were smiling and they looked as if they were peacefully asleep but they were dead. (Biton and Cleobis)”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“Kiss me yet once again, the last, long kiss, Until I draw your soul within my lips And drink down all your love.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“This idea the Greeks had of him is best summed up not by a poet, but by a philosopher, Plato: “Love—Eros—makes his home in men’s hearts, but not in every heart, for where there is hardness he departs. His greatest glory is that he cannot do wrong nor allow it; force never comes near him. For all men serve him of their own free will. And he whom Love touches not walks in darkness.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“We hold there is no worse enemy to a state than he who keeps the law in his own hands.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“He was softly breathing his life away, the dark blood flowing down his skin of snow and his eyes growing heavy and dim. She kissed him, but Adonis knew not that she kissed him as he died.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“It is the men of this land who are bloodthirsty and they lay their own guilt on the gods.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“Far better die," she said. She took in her hand a casket which held herbs for killing, but as she sat there with it, she thought of life and the delightful things that are in the world; and the sun seemed sweeter than ever before.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“Intelligence did not figure largely in anything he did and was often conspicuously absent.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“The influence of Greek art and literature became so powerful in Rome that ancient Roman deities were changed to resemble the corresponding Greek gods, and were considered to be the same. Most of them, however, in Rome had Roman names. These were Jupiter (Zeus), Juno (Hera), Neptune (Poseidon), Vesta (Hestia), Mars (Ares), Minerva (Athena), Venus (Aphrodite), Mercury (Hermes), Diana (Artemis), Vulcan or Mulciber (Hephaestus), Ceres (Demeter).”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“Tell him, too,” she said, “never to pluck flowers, and to think every bush may be a goddess in disguise.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes
“The fifth race is that which is now upon the earth: the iron race. They live in evil times and their nature too has much of evil, so that they never have rest from toil and sorrow. As the generations pass, they grow worse; sons are always inferior to their fathers. A time will come when they have grown so wicket that they will worship power, might will be right to them, and reverence for the good will cease to be.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“A silly man lies awake all night, Thinking of many things. When the morning comes he is worn with care, And his trouble is just as it was.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“I take courage,” Aeneas said. “Here too there are tears for things, and hearts are touched by the fate of all that is mortal.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“Not because he had complete courage based on overwhelming strength, which is merely a matter of course, but because, by his sorrow for wrongdoing ad his willingness to do anything to expiate it, he showed greatness of soul.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“Moderately wise each one should be, Not overwise, for a wise man’s heart Is seldom glad. Cattle die and kindred die. We also die. But I know one thing that never dies, Judgment on each one dead.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“Appropriately, his bird was the vulture. The dog was wronged by being chosen as his animal.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology
“We seek the dead only, to return to earth the body, of which no man is the owner, but only for a brief moment the guest. Dust must return to dust again.”
Edith Hamilton, Mythology

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