Best Poems of the Brontë Sisters Quotes

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Best Poems of the Brontë Sisters Best Poems of the Brontë Sisters by Emily Brontë
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Best Poems of the Brontë Sisters Quotes Showing 1-12 of 12
“I love the silent hour of night,
For blissful dreams may then arise,
Revealing to my charmed sight
What may not bless my waking eyes.”
Anne Brontë, Best Poems of the Brontë Sisters
“Long have I dwelt forgotten here
In pining woe and dull despair;
This place of solitude and gloom
Must be my dungeon and my tomb.”
Anne Brontë, The Bronte Sisters: Selected Poems
“Some have won a wild delight,
By daring wilder sorrow;
Could I gain thy love to-night,
I'd hazard death to-morrow.”
Charlotte Brontë, Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell
“Though solitude, endured too long,
Bids youthful joys too soon decay,
Makes mirth a stranger to my tongue,
And overclouds my noon of day;

When kindly thoughts that would have way,
Flow back discouraged to my breast;
I know there is, though far away,
A home where heart and soul may rest.

Warm hands are there, that, clasped in mine,
The warmer heart will not belie;
While mirth, and truth, and friendship shine
In smiling lip and earnest eye.

The ice that gathers round my heart
May there be thawed; and sweetly, then,
The joys of youth, that now depart,
Will come to cheer my soul again.”
Anne Brontë, Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell
“Enough of thought, philosopher!
Too long hast thou been dreaming
Unlightened, in this chamber drear,
While summer’s sun is beaming!
Space-sweeping soul, what sad refrain
Concludes thy musings once again?”
Emily Brontë, Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell
tags: poetry
“Shall earth no more inspire thee,
Thou lonely dreamer now?
Since passion may not fire thee,
Shall nature cease to bow?”
Emily Brontë, Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell
“To-day, I will seek not the shadowy region;
Its unsustaining vastness waxes drear;
And visions rising, legion after legion,
Bring the unreal world too strangely near.”
Emily Brontë, Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell
“And I am weary of the anguish
Increasing winters bear;
Weary to watch the spirit languish
Through years of dead despair.

So, if a tear, when thou art dying,
Should haply fall from me,
It is but that my soul is sighing,
To go and rest with thee.”
Emily Brontë, Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell
“Oh, Youth may listen patiently,
While sad Experience tells her tale,
But Doubt sits smiling in his eye,
For ardent Hope will still prevail!

He hears how feeble Pleasure dies,
By guilt destroyed, and pain and woe;
He turns to Hope—and she replies,
“Believe it not-it is not so!”
Anne Brontë, Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell
“Thoughtful for Winter’s future sorrow,
Its gloom and scarcity;
Prescient to-day, of want to-morrow,
Toiled quiet Memory.

’Tis she that from each transient pleasure
Extracts a lasting good;
’Tis she that finds, in summer, treasure
To serve for winter’s food.

And when Youth’s summer day is vanished,
And Age brings Winter’s stress,
Her stores, with hoarded sweets replenished,
Life’s evening hours will bless.”
Charlotte Brontë, Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell
“To toil, to think, to long, to grieve,—
Is such my future fate?
The morn was dreary, must the eve
Be also desolate?”
Charlotte Brontë, Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell
“We can burst the bonds which chain us,
Which cold human hands have wrought,
And where none shall dare restrain us
We can meet again, in thought.”
Charlotte Brontë, Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell