Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore Quotes

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Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore by Walter Mosley
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Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore Quotes Showing 1-9 of 9
“It hurts when they're gone. And it doesn't matter if it's slow or fast, whether it's a long drawn-out disease or an unexpected accident. When they're gone the world turns upside down and you're left holding on, trying not to fall off.”
Walter Mosley, Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore
“Love makes you blind to your own survival. And if it doesn't then it's not love at all.”
Walter Mosley, Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore
“I'm sorry he's dead but I am happier, by far, that he lived.”
Walter Mosley, Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore
tags: death, life
“I think that the power over death and life is the greatest strength that any person can have. It trumps sex and wealth. If I'm willing to die no one can master me.”
Walter Mosley, Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore
“It's the strongest love that makes the greatest treachery. The worst thing you can say to somebody is that you will be there no matter what and then fail to show.”
Walter Mosley, Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore
tags: love
“A lot of people love their hate. They live to hate the people wronged them. You cain't just have one gang. That don't even make sense. If you took away the white man's black man or the black man's white man, most of 'em wouldn't even know how to walk down the street right.”
Walter Mosley, Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore
“It's like a door open at the side of the house and this cool breeze is blowing in over the back of my neck. The breeze is Death whispering and that door is open for me to go through anytime I want. And I want to go through. I want the confusion to stop--no, not only confusion but pain too.”
Walter Mosley, Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore
“This distinction was very important to him: His mother did love him but not enough to save him.”
Walter Mosley, Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore
“We got a call from across the street that a black woman had broken into this house.”
“And you were going to arrest her without even knocking on the door?”
“We had to secure her first. Um. Are you okay, ma’am?”
“Of course I am. Don’t you see me?”
“Because we have her in custody. You don’t have to be afraid.”
“I’m not afraid of my daughter-in-law, Mrs. Theon Pinkney. She’s the one who should be afraid. Four big men grabbing her and putting her in chains. What’s wrong with you?”
The police stood there, slightly confused. I could see that they felt justified, even righteous, for grabbing me in Marcia’s driveway. There was no question in their minds that I was a criminal and that they were on the side of the Law.
Marcia glanced at me then. We’d spent hours together but it was as if she hadn’t really gotten a good look at me until seeing the tableau in her driveway.”
Walter Mosley, Debbie Doesn't Do It Anymore
tags: race