The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson Quotes

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The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson by Ralph Waldo Emerson
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The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson Quotes Showing 31-60 of 58
“Every ultimate fact is only the first of a new series. Every general law only a particular fact of some more general law presently to disclose itself. There is no outside, no inclosing wall, no circumference to us. The”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Trust thyself: [156] every heart vibrates to that iron string. Accept the place the divine providence has found for you, the society of your contemporaries, the connection of events. Great men have always done so, and confided themselves childlike to the genius of their age, betraying their perception that the absolutely trustworthy was seated at their heart, working through their hands, predominating in all their being. And we are now men, and must accept in the highest mind the same transcendent destiny; and not minors and invalids in a protected corner, not cowards fleeing before a revolution, but guides, redeemers, and benefactors, obeying the Almighty effort, and advancing on Chaos [157] and the Dark. What”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Society is a wave. The wave moves onward, but the water of which it is composed does not. The same particle does not rise from the valley to the ridge. Its unity is only phenomenal. The persons who make up a nation to-day, next year die, and their experience with them.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“He is a dull observer whose experience has not taught him the reality and force of magic, as well as of chemistry.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“A fever, a mutilation, a cruel disappointment, a loss of wealth, a loss of friends, seems at the moment unpaid loss, and unpayable. But the sure years reveal the deep remedial force that underlies all facts. The death of a dear friend, wife, brother, lover, which seemed nothing but privation, somewhat later assumes the aspect of a guide or genius; for it commonly operates revolutions in our way of life, terminates an epoch of infancy or of youth which was waiting to be closed, breaks up a wonted occupation, or a household, or style of living, and allows the formation of new ones more friendly to the growth of character.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“I do not wish to treat friendships daintily, but with roughest courage. When they are real, they are not glass threads or frost-work, but the solidest thing we know.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“We but half express ourselves, [155] and are ashamed of that divine idea which each of us represents.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“No facts are to me sacred; none are profane; I simply experiment, an endless seeker with no Past at my back.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“But the President has paid dear for his White House. It has commonly cost him all his peace, and the best of his manly attributes. To preserve for a short time so conspicuous an appearance before the world, he is content to eat dust before the real masters who stand erect behind the throne.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Every man alone is sincere. At the entrance of a second person, hypocrisy begins.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“The soul raised over passion beholds identity and eternal causation, perceives the self-existence of Truth and Right, and calms itself with knowing that all things go well.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Treat men as pawns and ninepins and you shall suffer as well as they. If you leave out their heart, you shall lose your own.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“I think that our popular theology has gained in decorum, and not in principle, over the superstitions it has displaced.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“the bold sensualist will use the name of philosophy to gild his crimes.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“The service a man renders his friend is trivial and selfish, compared with the service he knows his friend stood in readiness to yield him, alike before he had begun to serve his friend, and now also.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Nature hates monopolies and exceptions.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Do what we can, summer will have its flies.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Far off, men swell, bully and threaten: bring them hand to hand, and they are a feeble folk.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Men seek to be great; they would have offices, wealth, power, and fame. They think that to be great is to possess one side of nature,—the sweet, without the other side,—the bitter.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“The field cannot be well seen from within the field.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“As the eyes of Lyncæus were said to see through the earth, so the poet turns the world to glass, and shows us all things in their right series and procession.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Fear always springs from ignorance.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“That divided and rebel mind, that distrust of a sentiment because our arithmetic has computed the strength and means opposed to our purpose, these [158] have not. Their mind being whole, their eye is as yet unconquered, and when we look in their faces we are disconcerted.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“nature is not slow to equip us in the prison-uniform of the party to which we adhere. We come to wear one cut of face and figure, and acquire by degrees the gentlest asinine expression.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“The end of friendship is a commerce the most strict and homely that can be joined; more strict than any of which we have experience. It is for aid and comfort through all the relations and passages of life and death. It is fit for serene days, and graceful gifts, and country rambles, but also for rough roads and hard fare, shipwreck, poverty, and persecution. It keeps company with the sallies of the wit and the trances of religion. We are to dignify to each other the daily needs and offices of man's life, and embellish it by courage, wisdom and unity.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Cause and effect are two sides of one fact.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Without the rich heart, wealth is an ugly beggar.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“the trees are imperfect men, and seem to bemoan their imprisonment, rooted in the ground.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson

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