The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals Quotes

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The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals by Charles Darwin
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The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals Quotes Showing 1-10 of 10
“Blushing is the most peculiar and most human of all expressions.”
Charles Darwin, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals
“It is always advisable to perceive clearly our ignorance.”
Charles Darwin, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals
“Englishmen rarely cry, except under the pressure of the acutest grief; whereas in some parts of the Continent the men shed tears much more readily and freely.”
Charles Darwin, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals
“When a man merely speaks to, or just notices, his dog,we see the last vestige of these movements in a slight wag of the tail, without any other movement of the body, and without even the ears being lowered. Dogs also exhibit their affection by desiring to rub against their masters, and to be rubbed or patted by them.”
Charles Darwin, The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals
“Further on, he adds, that dogs, when feeling affectionate, lower their ears in order to exclude all sounds, so that their whole attention may be concentrated on the caresses of their master! Dogs have another and striking way of exhibiting their affection, namely, by licking the hands or faces of their masters.”
Charles Darwin, The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals
“The upper lip during the act of grinning is retracted, as in snarling, so that the canines are exposed, and the ears are drawn backwards; but the general appearance of the animal clearly shows that anger is not felt. Sir C. Bell[3] remarks "Dogs, in their expression of fondness, have a slight eversion of the lips, and grin and sniff amidst their gambols, in a way that resembles laughter." Some persons speak of the grin as a smile, but if it had been really a smile, we should see a similar, though more pronounced, movement of the lips and ears, when dogs utter their bark of joy; but this is not the case, although a bark of joy often follows a grin.”
Charles Darwin, The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals
“I have described, in the second chapter, the gait and appearance of a dog when cheerful, and the marked antithesis presented by the same animal when dejected and disappointed, with his head, ears, body, tail, and chops drooping, and eyes dull.”
Charles Darwin, The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals
“No doubt as long as man and all other animals are viewed as independent creations, an effectual stop is put to our natural desire to investigate as far as possible the causes of Expression.”
Charles Darwin, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals
“218.The same principle probably explains why dogs, when feeling affectionate, like rubbing against their masters and being rubbed or patted by them, for from the nursing of their puppies, contact with a beloved object has become firmly associated in their minds with the emotion of love. The feeling of affection of a dog towards his master is combined with a strong sense of submission, which is akin to fear. Hence dogs not only lower their bodies and crouch a little as they approach their masters, but sometimes throw themselves on the ground with their bellies upwards.”
Charles Darwin, The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals
“A pleasurable and excited state of mind, associated with affection, is exhibited by some dogs in a very peculiar manner, namely, by grinning.”
Charles Darwin, The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals