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Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness by Richard H. Thaler
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Nudge Quotes (showing 1-30 of 118)
“A choice architect has the responsibility for organizing the context in which people make decisions.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“First, never underestimate the power of inertia. Second, that power can be harnessed.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“The combination of loss aversion with mindless choosing implies that if an option is designated as the “default,” it will attract a large market share. Default options thus act as powerful nudges.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“Libertarian paternalism is a relatively weak, soft, and nonintrusive type of paternalism because choices are not blocked, fenced off, or significantly burdened.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“The first misconception is that it is possible to avoid influencing people’s choices.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam. There the authorities have etched the image of a black housefly into each urinal. It seems that men usually do not pay much attention to where they aim, which can create a bit of a mess, but if they see a target, attention and therefore accuracy are much increased.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“people have a strong tendency to go along with the status quo or default option.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“A nudge, as we will use the term, is any aspect of the choice architecture that alters people’s behavior in a predictable way without forbidding any options or significantly changing their economic incentives.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“you want to nudge people into socially desirable behavior, do not, by any means, let them know that their current actions are better than the social norm.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“An especially good way to gain weight is to have dinner with other people.11 On average, those who eat with one other person eat about 35 percent more than they do when they are alone; members of a group of four eat about 75 percent more; those in groups of seven or more eat 96 percent more.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“make an active decision”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“So to put it simply, forcing people to choose is not always wise, and remaining neutral is not always possible.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“MBA students are not the only ones overconfident about their abilities. The “above average” effect is pervasive. Ninety percent of all drivers think they are above average behind the wheel,”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“We are also greatly influenced by consumption norms within the relevant group. A light eater eats much more in a group of heavy eaters. A heavy eater will show more restraint in a light-eating group. The group average thus exerts a significant influence. But there are gender differences as well. Women often eat less on dates; men tend to eat a lot more, apparently with the belief that women are impressed by a lot of manly eating. (Note to men: they aren’t.) So”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“Real people have trouble with long division if they don’t have a calculator, sometimes forget their spouse’s birthday, and have a hangover on New Year’s Day.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“First, never underestimate the power of inertia. Second, that power can be harnessed. If private companies or public officials think that one policy produces better outcomes, they can greatly influence the outcome by choosing it as the default.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“A slightly longer answer is that people will need nudges for decisions that are difficult and rare, for which they do not get prompt feedback, and when they have trouble translating aspects of the situation into terms that they can easily understand. In”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“special case of this rule of thumb is what might be called the “1/n” heuristic: “When faced with ‘n’ options, divide assets evenly across the options.”3 Put the same number of eggs in each basket.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“Markowitz’s strategy can be viewed as one example of what might be called the diversification heuristic. “When in doubt, diversify.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“As we will soon see, it is not clear that patients gain a lot from the right to sue. At the same time, part of the current cost is passed onto patients, in the form of higher bills, and defensive medicine can be bad medicine for those who want good care.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“First, incentives are not properly aligned. If you engage in environmentally costly behavior next year, through your consumption choices, you will probably pay nothing for the environmental harms that you inflict.”
Richard H Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth and Happiness
“Private relationships, intimate and otherwise, might be structured in many different ways, and the simple dichotomy between “single” and “married” does not do justice to what people might choose.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“People are unrealistically optimistic even when the stakes are high. About 50 percent of marriages end in divorce, and this is a statistic most people have heard. But around the time of the ceremony, almost all couples believe that there is approximately a zero percent chance that their marriage will end in divorce—even those who have already been divorced!10 (Second marriage, Samuel Johnson once quipped, “is the triumph of hope over experience.”)”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“individual risk taking, especially in the domain of risks to life and health.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“specific values to objects. When they have to give something up, they are hurt more than they are pleased if they acquire the very same thing.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“That does not mean something is wrong with us as humans, but it does mean that our understanding of human behavior can be improved by appreciating how people systematically go wrong.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“Benefits Now—Costs Later We have seen that predictable problems arise when people must make decisions that test their capacity for self-control. Many choices in life, such as whether to wear a blue shirt or a white one, lack important self-control elements. Self-control issues are most likely to arise when choices and their consequences are separated in time. At one extreme are what might be called investment goods, such as exercise, flossing, and dieting. For these goods the costs are borne immediately, but the benefits are delayed. For investment goods, most people err on the side of doing too little. Although there are some exercise nuts and flossing freaks, it seems safe to say that not many people are resolving on New Year’s Eve to floss less next year and to stop using the exercise bike so much.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“Benefits Now—Costs Later We have seen that predictable problems arise when people must make decisions that test their capacity for self-control. Many choices in life, such as whether to wear a blue shirt or a white one, lack important self-control elements. Self-control issues are most likely to arise when choices and their consequences are separated in time. At one extreme are what might be called investment goods, such as exercise, flossing, and dieting. For these goods the costs are borne immediately, but the benefits are delayed. For investment goods, most people err on the side of doing too little. Although there are some exercise nuts and flossing freaks, it seems safe to say that not many people are resolving on New Year’s Eve to floss less next year and to stop using the exercise bike so much. At the other extreme are what might be called sinful goods: smoking, alcohol, and jumbo chocolate doughnuts are in this category. We get the pleasure now and suffer the consequences later. Again we can use the New Year’s resolution test: how many people vow to smoke more cigarettes, drink more martinis, or have more chocolate donuts in the morning next year? Both investment goods and sinful goods are prime candidates for nudges. Most (nonanorexic) people do not need any special encouragement to eat another brownie, but they could use some help exercising more.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
“Unrealistic optimism is a pervasive feature of human life; it characterizes most people in most social categories. When they overestimate their personal immunity from harm, people may fail to take sensible preventive steps. If people are running risks because of unrealistic optimism, they might be able to benefit from a nudge. In fact, we have already mentioned one possibility: if people are reminded of a bad event, they may not continue to be so optimistic.”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, And Happiness
“In economics (and in ordinary life), a basic principle is that you can never be made worse off by having more options, because you can always turn them down. Before Thaler removed the nuts the group had the choice of whether to eat the nuts or not—now they didn’t. In the land of Econs, it is against the law to be happy about this!”
Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness

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