Farm Sanctuary Quotes

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Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds About Animals and Food Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds About Animals and Food by Gene Baur
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Farm Sanctuary Quotes (showing 1-6 of 6)
“The sixteen hundred dairies in California’s Central Valley alone produce more waste than a city of twenty-one million people-that’s more than the populations of London, New York, and Chicago combined.”
Gene Baur, Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds About Animals and Food
“A noted writer in The Washington Post recently described the cause of compassion for farm animals as “the moral calling of our time.”
Gene Baur, Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds About Animals and Food
“Becoming a vegan is not about self-denial; it’s more a matter of self-awareness. It is about trying new foods and broadening your palate, expressing the joy of being alive, and knowing that you’re making a daily effort to live less violently and more sustainably.”
Gene Baur, Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds About Animals and Food
“The size and shape of the birds have also made it impossible for commercial turkeys to mount and breed naturally. This means that workers at breeding facilities have to masturbate male turkeys, called toms, to collect their semen. Then, in rapid succession, the females are turned upside down and their legs secured by a clamp. The semen is put in straws and inserted into the hen. She’s then released from the clamp, making way for the next in line. Not a pleasant process for the bird, nor a job one can take much pride in.”
Gene Baur, Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds About Animals and Food
“Albert Einstein once said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.”
Gene Baur, Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds About Animals and Food
“Even in the production of wool, cruelty is a feature. To reduce problems with flies that infest the folds in the skin of Merino sheep (the most highly prized wool breed), producers practice “mulesing.” Strips of flesh are literally cut off the backs of the animals’ legs and hind region to create smooth skin without anesthesia or pain relievers. Sheep also commonly have their tails cut off to control fly problems.”
Gene Baur, Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds About Animals and Food