The Art of Eating Quotes

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The Art of Eating The Art of Eating by M.F.K. Fisher
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The Art of Eating Quotes Showing 1-15 of 15
“It seems to me that our three basic needs, for food and security and love, are so mixed and mingled and entwined that we cannot straightly think of one without the others. So it happens that when I write of hunger, I am really writing about love and the hunger for it, and warmth and the love of it and the hunger for it… and then the warmth and richness and fine reality of hunger satisfied… and it is all one.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“The smell of good bread baking, like the sound of lightly flowing water, is indescribable in its evocation of innocence and delight...

[Breadmaking is] one of those almost hypnotic businesses, like a dance from some ancient ceremony. It leaves you filled with one of the world's sweetest smells... there is no chiropractic treatment, no Yoga exercise, no hour of
meditation in a music-throbbing chapel. that will leave you emptier of bad thoughts than this homely ceremony of making bread.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“I think that when two people are able to weave that kind of invisible thread of understanding and sympathy between each other, that delicate web, they should not risk tearing it. It is too rare, and it lasts too short a time at best....”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“...for me there is too little of life to spend most of it forcing myself into detachment from it.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“No yoga exercise, no meditation in a chapel filled with music will rid you of your blues better than the humble task of making your own bread.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“There are very few men and women, I suspect, who cooked and marketed their way through the past war without losing forever some of the nonchalant extravagance of the Twenties. They will feel, until their final days on earth, a kind of culinary caution: butter, no matter how unlimited, is a precious substance not lightly to be wasted; meats, too, and eggs, and all the far-brought spices of the world, take on a new significance, having once been so rare. And that is good, for there can be no more shameful carelessness than with the food we eat for life itself When we exist without thought or thanksgiving we are not men, but beasts.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“I was horribly self-conscious; I wanted everybody to look at me and think me the most fascinating creature in the world, and yet I died a small hideous death if I saw even one person throw a casual glance at me.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
tags: youth
“You may feel that you have eaten too much...But this pastry is like
feathers - it is like snow. It is in fact good for you, a digestive!”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
tags: food
“But if I must be alone, I refuse to be alone as if it were something weak and distasteful, like convalescence.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“Or you can broil the meat, fry the onions, stew the garlic in the red wine...and ask me to supper. I'll not care, really, even if your nose is a little shiny, so long as you are self-possessed and sure that wolf or no wolf, your mind is your own and your heart is another's and therefore in the right place.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“I sat in the gradually chilling room, thinking of my whole past the way a drowning man is supposed to, and it seemed part of the present, part of the gray cold and the beggar woman without a face and the moulting birds frozen to their own filth in the Orangerie. I know now I was in the throes of some small glandular crisis, a sublimated bilious attack, a flick from the whip of melancholia, but then it was terrifying...nameless....”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“Perhaps they should feel this safe sand blow away so that their heads are uncovered for a time, so that they will have to taste not only the solid honesty of my red borscht, but the new flavor of the changing world.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“Painting, it is true, was undergoing a series of -isms reminiscent of the whims of a pregnant woman.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“...after rare beef and wine, when the lobes turn red, was the time to ask favours or tell bad news.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating
“PROBABLY one of the most private things in the world is an egg until it is broken.”
M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating