The Soul of Atlas Quotes

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The Soul of Atlas The Soul of Atlas by Mark David Henderson
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“You want to know what's wrong with the world?" Dad paused. "It's this alienation that permeates every aspect of humanity.”
Mark David Henderson, The Soul of Atlas
“To recognize and comprehend what influences us and others is to function with purpose.”
Mark David Henderson, The Soul of Atlas
“The Socialist system requires that each individual act out of selfless, altruistic motives. It sounds nice, but the only way that could happen is if Man were innately centered on others.”
Mark David Henderson, The Soul of Atlas
“Of all the social systems in mankind’s history, capitalism is the only system based on an objective theory of values.[1] Ayn Rand”
Mark David Henderson, The Soul of Atlas: Ayn Rand, Christianity, a Quest for Common Ground
“Objectivism and Christianity disagree on where money falls in the hierarchy of values. Objectivists see it at or close to the top because it supports the life of the individual. Christians see it down the hierarchy, not because Christians value the individual any less, but because they value God above all else. While the practical out-workings of each perspective may look similar, the core filter that precipitates each of the respective actions is different. Both value achievement and production. Both can be good Capitalists. But the Objectivist’s choices will value and exalt the worth of the Individual, while the choices of a Christian will exalt the worth of God. The Objectivist idea of virtue is closely linked to work and production.”
Mark David Henderson, The Soul of Atlas: Ayn Rand, Christianity, a Quest for Common Ground
“And with the image of Jesus carrying the cross, I hearken back to the statue of Atlas on Fifth Avenue, where there is a poignant contrast. Across the street from Atlas stands the majestic Saint Patrick’s Cathedral. There, facing one another, these monuments pay tribute to the world views of my fathers: Christianity and Objectivism; Faith and Reason. Each is resolute in its position and stands in strength. Yet, they could not be more disparate. Where Atlas carries the world, Jesus carries the cross.”
Mark David Henderson, The Soul of Atlas: Ayn Rand, Christianity, a Quest for Common Ground
“Jesus does not say blandly that treasure in heaven results from our generosity on earth. More passionately, he urges his followers to pursue treasure in heaven, the way a thirsty desert wanderer pursues water, or a savvy portfolio manager scours the financial landscape for investments. John comes nowhere close to the Biblical conclusion. Not through faulty reasoning, but the Objectivist simply starts from a different premise. That premise leads him to the “primacy of the individual.”
Mark David Henderson, The Soul of Atlas: Ayn Rand, Christianity, a Quest for Common Ground
“When he wants to emphasize the simplicity and incontrovertible logic of his conclusion, he reverts to the street vernacular of his South Philly roots, even the accent. The more passionate, the more hand movement. It was John’s unique way of expressing Ayn Rand’s philosophy. What Ayn Rand did with prose, John accomplished with manual flourish. What he emphasized with passionate emotion, she communicated with tight, and sometimes biting, logic: not in sarcasm, but in compelling passages.”
Mark David Henderson, The Soul of Atlas: Ayn Rand, Christianity, a Quest for Common Ground
“If productiveness is the ultimate measure of worth, then making money is the highest of virtues, and John’s passions are rightly placed. But if God is the ultimate occupation of the human soul, then Dad’s passion to get the most of God is the human’s highest goal. Instead of using earned wealth to enhance his life with material comforts, the Bible offers a life-enhancement scheme that takes it to another level altogether.”
Mark David Henderson, The Soul of Atlas: Ayn Rand, Christianity, a Quest for Common Ground
“Ayn Rand is criticized for limiting the government’s rightful role. True, her Capitalism requires “laissez-faire” to accurately reflect her understanding and intention; but she was not an anarchist.”
Mark David Henderson, The Soul of Atlas: Ayn Rand, Christianity, a Quest for Common Ground