A Moveable Feast Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
A Moveable Feast A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway
107,262 ratings, 4.04 average rating, 7,481 reviews
Open Preview
A Moveable Feast Quotes Showing 181-210 of 237
“She was angry at Ezra Pound because he had sat down too quickly on a small, fragile and, doubtless, uncomfortable chair, that it is quite possible he had been given on purpose, and had either cracked or broken it. That he was a great poet and a gentle and generous man and could have accommodated himself in a normal-size chair was not considered.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“..and I felt the death loneliness that comes at the end of every day that is wasted in your life.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Слънцето сушеше мокрите лица на къщите срещу прозореца ми.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“watched Lewis carefully without seeming to look at him, as you do when you are boxing, and I do not think I had ever seen a nastier-looking man. Some people show evil as a great race horse shows breeding. They have the dignity of a hard chancre. Lewis did not show evil; he just looked nasty.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I had always avoided looking at Ford when I could and I always held my breath when I was near him in a closed room, but this was the open air and the fallen leaves blew along the sidewalks from my side of the table past his, so I took a good look at him, repented, and looked across the boulevard. The light was changed again and I had missed the change. I took a drink to see if his coming had fouled it, but it still tasted good.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“People who interfered in your life always did it for your own good and I figured it out finally that what they wanted was for you to conform completely and never differ from some accepted surface standard and then dissipate the way traveling salesmen would at a convention in every stupid and boreing way there was.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“In the end everyone, or not quite everyone, made friends again in order not to be stuffy or righteous. I did too. But I could never make friends again truly, neither in my heart nor in my head. When you cannot make friends any more in your head is the worst. But it was more complicated than that.”
Hemingway Ernest, A Moveable Feast
“There is never any ending to Paris and the memory of each person who has lived in it differs from that of any other. We always returned to it no matter who we were or how it was changed or with what difficulties, or ease, it could be reached. Paris was always worth it and you received return for whatever you brought to it.”
Hemingway Ernest, A Moveable Feast
“All things truly wicked start from an innocence.”
Hemingway Ernest, A Moveable Feast
“His talent was as natural as the pattern that was made by the dust on a butterfly swings. at one time he understood it no more than the butterfly did and he did not know when it was brushed or marred. later he became conscious of his damaged wings and of their construction and he learned to think and could not fly any more because the love of flight was gone and he could only remember when it had been effortless.”
Ernest Hemlingway Hemlinway, A Moveable Feast
“Tolstoi made the writing of Stephen Crane on the Civil War seem like the brilliant imagining of a sick boy who had never seen war but had only read the battles and chronicles and seen the Brady”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“i looked at him and his marked-for-death look and i thought, you con man conning me with your con. i've seen a battalion in the dust on the road, a third of them for" death or worse and no special marks on them, the dust for all, and you and your marked-for-death look, you con man, making a living out of your death. now you will con me. con not, that thou be not conned. death was not conning with him. it was coming all right.”
Ernest Hemlingway Hemlinway, A Moveable Feast
“you could live in the other wonderful world the Russian writers were giving you. At first there were the Russians; then there were all the others. But for a long time there were the Russians.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“the man who had taught me to distrust adjectives as i would later learn to distrust certain people in certain situations;”
Ernest Hemlingway Hemlinway, A Moveable Feast
“Tal vez, lejos de París, podría escribir sobre París tal como en París era capaz de escribir sobre Michigan.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Nunca salgas de viaje con una persona que no amas.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Todo, lo bueno y lo malo, deja un vacío cuando se interrumpe. Pero si se trata de algo malo, el vacío va llenándose por sí solo. Mientras que el vacío de algo bueno sólo puede llenarse descubriendo algo mejor.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“write. There was going to be everything that a man needed to write except to be alone. Zelda”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Но Париж е безкрайно многолик и всеки, който е живял в него, го помни по своему, не тъй както другите. Ние винаги се връщахме в него, както и да се променяхме, както и да се изменяше той, независимо дали ни беше трудно или лесно да отидем там. Париж винаги си заслужваше това – каквото и да му отдадеш, ще получиш равностойна замяна. Но аз описвам какъв беше Париж в ония далечни дни, когато бяхме много бедни и много щастливи.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“with bad painters all you need to do is not look at them. but even when you have learned not to look at families nor listen to them and have learned not to answer letters, families have many ways of being dangerous.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Le pis c'est quand vous êtes séparé d'un ami par l'esprit.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Si vous avez la chance d’avoir vécu jeune homme à Paris, où que vous alliez pour le reste de votre vie, cela ne vous quitte pas, car Paris est une fête.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“We both touched wood on the café table and the wait came to see what it was we wanted. But what we wanted not he, nor anyone else, nor knocking on wood or marble, as this café table-top was, could ever bring us. But we did not know it that night and we were very happy.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“The one who is doing his work and getting satisfaction from it is not the one the poverty bothers.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“We ate well and cheaply and drank well and cheaply and slept well and warm together and loved each other. ‘I”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Wenn der Frühling kam, selbst der trügerische Frühling, gab es keine Probleme außer dem, wo man am glücklichsten sein würde. Das einzige, was einen Tag verderben konnte, waren Menschen, und wenn man vermeiden konnte, Verabredungen zu treffen, so war jeder Tag ohne Grenzen. Menschen waren immer die Begrenzer des Glücks, bis auf die sehr wenigen, die so gut waren wie der Frühling selbst.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“that's hilaire belloc,' i said to my friend. 'ford was here this afternoon and cut him dead.' 'don't be a silly ass,' my friend said. 'that's aleister crowley, the diabolist. he's supposed to be the wickedest man in the world.' 'sorry,' i said.”
Ernest Hemlingway Hemlinway, A Moveable Feast
“In later life the idea of a moveable feast for Hemingway became something very much like what King Harry wanted St. Crispin's Feast Day to be for "we happy few": a memory or even a state of being that had become a part of you, a thing that you could have always with you, no matter where you went or how you lived forever after, that you could never lose. An experience first fixed in time and space or a condition like happiness or love could be afterward moved or carried with you wherever you went in space and time.”
Patrick Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“You expected to be sad in the fall. Part of you died each year when the leaves fell from the trees and their branches were bare against the wind and the cold, wintry light. But you knew there would always be the spring, as you knew the river would flow again after it was frozen. When the cold rains kept on and killed the spring, it was as though a young person had died for no reason.”
rnestHemingway, A Moveable Feast
“it in those days.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition