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A Moveable Feast A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway
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A Moveable Feast Quotes Showing 151-180 of 237
“We both touched wood on the café table and the waiter came to see what it was we wanted. But what we wanted not he, nor anyone else, nor knocking on wood or marble, as this café table-top was, could ever bring us. But we did not know it that night and we were very happy.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“If I started to write elaborately, or like someone introducing or presenting something, I found that I could cut that scrollwork or ornament out and throw it away and start with the first true simple declarative sentence I had written. Up in that room I decided that I would write one story about each thing that I knew about. I was trying to do this all the time I was writing, and it was good and severe discipline.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“اگر بخت یارت بوده باشد تا در جوانی در پاریس زندگی کنی ، باقی عمرت را ، هر کجا که بگذرانی ، با تو خواهد بود ؛ چون پاریس ، جشنی است بیکران.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“A girl came in the cafe and sat by herself at a table near the window. She was very pretty with a face fresh as a newly minted coin if they minted coins in smooth flesh with rain-freshened skin, and her hair was black as a crow’s wing and cut sharply and diagonally across her cheek. I”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“In those days you did not really need anything, not even the rabbit’s foot, but it was good to feel it in your pocket.”
Hemingway Ernest, A Moveable Feast
“I remember the smell of the pines and the sleeping on the mattresses of beech leaves in the woodcutters’ huts and the skiing through the forest following the tracks of hares and of foxes. In the high mountains above the tree line I remember following the track of a fox until I came in sight of him and watching him stand with his forefoot raised and then go on carefully to stop and then pounce, and the whiteness and the clutter of a ptarmigan bursting out of the snow and flying away and over the ridge.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“Creation’s probably overrated. After all, God made the world in only six days and rested on the seventh.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Вы хотите сказать, что я не отмечен печатью смерти? - спросил я, не удержавшись.
- Нет, вы отмечены печатью Жизни. - Последнее слово он произнес с большой буквы.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Yes Tatie, and you and Chink always talking about how to make things true, writing them, and put them rightly and not describe. I remember everything. Sometimes he was right and sometimes you were right. I remember the lights and textures and the shapes you argued about.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I was leading, and already I missed not working and I felt the death loneliness that comes at the end of every day that is wasted in your life.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“Don’t read too fast,” she said.”
Hemingway Ernest, A Moveable Feast
“She had some ignition trouble with the old Model T Ford she then drove and the young man who worked in the garage and had served in the last year of the war had not been adept, or perhaps had not broken the priority of other vehicles, in repairing Miss Stein’s Ford. Anyway he had not been sérieux and had been corrected severely by the patron of the garage after Miss Stein’s protest. The patron had said to him, “You are all a génération perdue.” “That’s what you are. That’s what you all are,” Miss Stein said. “All of you young people who served in the war. You are a lost generation.”
Hemingway Ernest, A Moveable Feast
“I learned one thing.'

'What?'

'Never to go on trips with anyone you do not love.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“When you are twenty-five and are a natural heavyweight, missing a meal makes you very hungry. But it also sharpens all of your perceptions, and I found that many of the people I wrote about had very strong appetites and a great taste and desire for food, and most of them were looking forward to having a drink.”
Hemingway Ernest, A Moveable Feast
“But I could never make friends again truly, neither in my heart nor in my head. When you cannot make friends any more in your head is the worst. But it was more complicated than that.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“But then we did not think ever of ourselves as poor. We did not accept it. We thought we were superior people and other people that we looked down on and rightly mistrusted were rich. It had never seemed strange to me to wear sweatshirts for underwear to keep warm. It only seemed odd to rich. We ate well and cheaply and drank well and cheaply and slept well and warm together and loved each other.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Then there was the bad weather. It would come in one day when the fall was over. You would have to shut the windows in the night against the rain and the cold wind would strip the leaves from the trees in the Place Contrescarpe. The leaves lay sodden in the rain and the wind drove the rain against the big green autobus at the terminal and the Café des Amateurs was crowded and the windows misted over from the heat and the smoke inside. It was a sad, evilly run café where the drunkards of the quarter crowded together and I kept away from it because of the smell of dirty bodies and the sour smell of drunkenness.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“Do not worry. You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“Por entonces, ya había descubierto que todo, lo bueno y lo malo, deja un vacío cuando se interrumpe. Pero si se trata de algo malo, el vacío va llenándose por sí solo. Mientras que el vacío de algo bueno solo puede llenarse descubriendo algo mejor.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I walked down past the Lycée Henri Quatre and the ancient church of St.-Étienne-du-Mont and the windswept Place du Panthéon and cut in for shelter to the right and finally came out on the lee side of the Boulevard St.-Michel and worked on down it past the Cluny and the Boulevard St.-Germain until I came to a good café that I knew on the Place St.-Michel.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“When we came back to Paris it was clear and cold and lovely. The city had accommodated itself to winter, there was good wood for sale at the wood and coal place across our street, and there were braziers outside of many of the good cafés so that you could keep warm on the terraces. Our own apartment was warm and cheerful. We burned boulets which were molded, egg-shaped lumps of coal dust, on the wood fire, and on the streets the winter light was beautiful. Now you were accustomed to see the bare trees against the sky and you walked on the fresh-washed gravel paths through the Luxembourg gardens in the clear sharp wind. The trees were beautiful without their leaves when you were reconciled to them, and the winter winds blew across the surfaces of the ponds and the fountains were blowing in the bright light. All the distances were short now since we had been in the mountains. Because of the change in altitude I did not notice the grade of the hills except with pleasure, and the climb up to the top floor of the hotel where I worked, in a room that looked across all the roofs and the chimneys of the high hill of the quarter, was a pleasure. The fireplace drew well in the room and it was warm and pleasant to work.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“But we liked Miss Stein and her friend, although the friend was frightening, and the paintings and the cakes and the eau-devie were truly wonderful. They seemed to like us too and treated us as though we were very good, well-mannered and promising children and I felt that they forgave us for being in love and being married—time would fix that—and when my wife invited them to tea, they accepted.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“I have never seen a man who lost the blood from his face so fast, and I wondered where it went”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
tags: humour
“I learned to understand Cézanne much better and to see truly how he made landscapes when I was hungry. I used to wonder if he were hungry too when he painted; but I thought possibly it was only that he had forgotten to eat.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“We’ll come home and eat here and we’ll have a lovely meal and drink Beaune from the co-operative you can see right out of the window there with the price of the Beaune on the window. And afterwards we’ll read and then go to bed and make love.” “And we’ll never love anyone else but each other.” “No. Never.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“Eres mía y todo París es mío y yo soy de este cuaderno y de este lápiz.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“He liked the works of his friends, which is beautiful as loyalty but can be disastrous as judgment.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“You might be considered a gentleman in Italy,” Ford said magnanimously.”
Hemingway Ernest, A Moveable Feast
“It was when we had come back from Canada and were living in the rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs and Miss Stein and I were still good friends that Miss Stein made the remark about the lost generation. She had some ignition trouble with the old Model T Ford she then drove and the young man who worked in the garage and had served in the last year of the war had not been adept, or perhaps had not broken the priority of other vehicles, in repairing Miss Stein's Ford. Perhaps he had not realized the importance of Miss Stein's vehicle having the right of immediate repair. Anyway he had not been sérieux and had been corrected severely by the patron of the garage after Miss Stein's protest. The patron had said to him, 'You are all a génération perdue.'

'That's what you are. That's what you all are,' Miss Stein said. 'All of you young people who served in the war. You are a lost generation.'

'Really?' I said.

'You are,' she insisted. 'You have no respect for anything. You drink yourselves to death ...”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“At two meetings the stimulated horses that I was backing outraced the unstimulated or insufficiently stimulated beasts except for one race in which our fancy had been overstimulated to such a point that before the start he threw his jockey and breaking away completed a full circuit of the steeplechase course jumping beautifully by himself the way one can sometimes jump in dreams.”
Hemingway Ernest, A Moveable Feast