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A Moveable Feast A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway
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A Moveable Feast Quotes Showing 91-120 of 237
“It was a wonderful meal at Michaud’s after we got in; but when we had finished and there was no question of hunger any more the feeling that had been like hunger when we were on the bridge was still there when we caught the bus home. It was there when we came in the room and after we had gone to bed and made love in the dark, it was there. When I woke with the windows open and the moonlight on the roofs of the tall houses, it was there. I put my face away from the moonlight into the shadow but I could not sleep and lay awake thinking about it. We had both wakened twice in the night and my wife slept sweetly now with the moonlight on her face. I had to try to think it out and I was too stupid. Life had seemed so simple that morning when I had waked and found the false spring and heard the pipes of the man with the herd of goats and gone out bought the racing paper.

But Paris was a very old city and we were young and nothing was simple there, not even poverty, nor sudden money, nor the moonlight, nor right and wrong nor the breathing of someone who lay beside you in the moonlight.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I had never known any man to die while speaking in terza-rima”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Hunger is healthy and the pictures do look better when you are hungry”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“He thought of the Riviera, as it was then before it had all been built up, with the lovely stretches of blue sea and the sand beaches and the stretches of pine woods and the mountains of the Esterel going out into the sea. He remembered it as it was when he and Zelda had first found it before people went there for the summer.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Below Les Avants there was a chalet where the pension was wonderful and we would be together and have our books and at night be warm in bed together with the windows open and the stars bright.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“She's vicious,' Miss Stein said. 'She's truly vicious, so she can never be happy except with new people. She corrupts people.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Then as I was getting up to the Closerie des Lilas with the light on my old friend, the statue of Marshal Ney with his sword out and the shadows of the trees on the bronze, and he alone there and nobody behind him and what a fiasco he'd made of Waterloo, I thought that all generations were lost by something and always had been and always would be and I stopped at the Lilas to keep the statue company and drank a cold beer before going home to the flat over the sawmill.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Светът пречупва всеки... и убива онези, които не искат да бъдат пречупени”
Ърнест Хемингуей, A Moveable Feast
“Nobody climbs on skis now and almost everybody breaks their legs but maybe it is easier in the end to break your legs than to break your heart although they say that everything breaks now and that sometimes, afterwards, many are stronger at the broken places. I do not know about that now but this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Каждый год в тебе что-то умирает, когда с деревьев опадают листья, а голые ветки беззащитно качаются на ветру в холодном зимнем свете. Но ты знаешь, что весна обязательно придет, так же как ты уверен, что замерзшая река снова освободится ото льда. Но когда холодные дожди льют не переставая и убивают весну, кажется, будто ни за что загублена молодая жизнь... ... ... В то время я уже знал, что, когда что-то кончается в жизни, будь то плохое или хорошее, остается пустота. Но пустота, оставшаяся после плохого, заполняется сама собой. Пустоту же после чего-то хорошего можно заполнить, только отыскав что-то лучшее...”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“It was a very Corsican wine and you could dilute it by half with water and still receive its message.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I am like a blind pig when I work.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“We're always lucky," I said and like a fool I did not knock on wood. There was wood everywhere in that apartment to knock on too.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I’d be glad to shoot you.’ ‘Would you?’ ‘No. There’s a law against it.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“دختری به کافه آمد و تنها، پشت میزی نزدیک پنجره نشست. بسیار زیبا بود و چهره‌ای داشت به تازگی سکهٔ تازه ضرب شده - البته هرگز سکه‌ای با نسوج صاف و پوست باران خورده ضرب نشده است. مو‌هایش، به سیاهی پر زاغ، صاف و اریب روی گونه‌هایش ریخته بود. نگاهش کردم و آرزو کردم که او را هم در داستان یا هر جای دیگری جا بدهم. هر بار که با مدادتراش مدادم را تیز می‌کردم و تراشه‌ها پیچ و تاب خوران توی نعلبکیِ زیر مشروبم می‌ریختند به آن دختر چشم می‌دوختم.
«دیدمت‌ای زیبا‌رو، و دیگر از آنِ منی-‌ حال چشم به راه هرکه خواهی گو باش- و چه باک که من هرگز دیگر نبینمت؟ تو از‌آنِ منی و سرتاسر پاریس از‌آنِ من است، و من از‌آنِ این دفتر و قلمم.»”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I would stand and look out over the roofs of Paris and think, “Do not worry. You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.” So finally I would write one true sentence, and then go on from there.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“All of the sadness of the city came suddenly with the first cold rains of winter, and there were no more tops to the high white houses as you walked but only the wet blackness of the street and the closed doors of the small shops, the herb sellers, the stationery and the newspaper shops, the midwife—second class—and the hotel where Verlaine had died where you had a room on the top floor where you worked.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“The blue-backed notebooks, the two pencils and the pencil sharpener (a pocket knife was too wasteful) the marble-topped tables, the smell of early morning, sweeping out and mopping, and luck were all you needed. For luck you carried a horse chestnut and a rabbit's foot in your right pocket. The fur had been worn off the rabbit's foot long ago and the bones and the sinews were polished by wear. The claws scratched in the lining of your pocket and you knew your luck was still there.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“Hem, you know I don't think that owner's wife where you live likes me. She wouldn't let me wait upstairs for you.'
'I'll tell her,' I said.
'Don't bother. I can always wait here. It's very pleasant in the sun now, isn't it?'
'It's fall now,' I said. 'I don't think you dress warmly enough.'
'It's only cool in the evening,' Evan said. 'I'll wear my coat.'
'Do you know where it is?'
'No. But it's somewhere safe.'
'How do you know?'
'Because I left the poem in it.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“He started to talk about my writing and I stopped listening. I was embarrassed and it made me feel sick for people to talk about my writing to my face, and I looked at him and his marked-for-death look and I thought, you con man conning me with your con. I’ve seen a battalion in the dust on the road, a third of them for death or worse and no special marks on them, the dust was for all, and you and your marked for death look, you con man, making a living out of your death. Now you will con me. Con not, that thou be not conned. Death was not conning with him. It was coming all right.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I’ve seen you, beauty, and you belong to me now, whoever you are waiting for and if I never see you again, I thought. You belong to me and all Paris belongs to me and I belong to this notebook and this pencil.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“She talked all the time and at first it was about people and places.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Let’s walk down the rue de Seine and look in all the galleries and in the windows of the shops.’

‘Sure. We can walk anywhere and we can stop at some new café where we don’t know anyone and nobody knows us and have a drink.’

‘We can have two drinks.’

‘Then we can eat somewhere.’

‘No. Don’t forget we have to pay the library.’

‘We’ll come home and eat here and we’ll have a lovely meal and drink Beaune from the co-operative you can see right out of the window there with the price of the Beaune on the window. And afterwards we’ll read and then go to bed and make love.’

‘And we’ll never love anyone else but each other.’

‘No. Never.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“By then I knew that everything good and bad left an emptiness when it stopped. But if it was bad, the emptiness was filled up by itself. If it was good you could only fill it by finding something better.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Когато двама души се обичат, когато те са щастливи и весели, и единият от тях или двамата работят и правят нещо наистина хубаво, те привличат хората тъй силно, както морският фар привлича прелетните птици нощем. Ако двамината можеха да бъдат тъй здраво изградени като морски фар, биха пострадали само птиците.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“When the cold rains kept on and killed the spring, it was as though a young person had died for no reason.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“پاریس را هرگز پایانی نیست و خاطره‌ی هر کسی که در آن زیسته باشد با خاطره‌ی دیگری فرق دارد. ما همیشه آنجا باز می‌گشتیم، بی‌توجه به اینکه که بودیم یا پاریس چگونه تغییر کرده بود یا با چه دشواری‌ها و راحتی‌ها می‌شد به آن رسید. پاریس همیشه ارزشش را داشت و در ازای هر چه برایش می‌بردی چیزی می‌گرفتی. به هر حال این بود پاریس در آن روزهایی که ما بسیار تهیدست و بسیار خوشبخت بودیم”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Dizem que as sementes daquilo que havemos de realizar se encontram já todas dentro de nós, mas sempre me pareceu que, naqueles que troçam da vida, as sementes se encontram cobertas de melhor terra e de uma percentagem mais alta de adubo.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“All things truly wicked start from innocence. So you live day by day and enjoy what you have and do not worry. You lie and hate it and it destroys you and every day is more dangerous, but you live day to day as in a war.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“It was a pleasant café, warm and clean and friendly, and I hung up my old waterproof on the coat rack to dry and put my worn and weathered felt hat on the rack above the bench and ordered a café au lait. The waiter brought it and I took out a notebook from the pocket of the coat and a pencil and started to write. I was writing about up in Michigan and since it was a wild, cold, blowing day it was that sort of day in the story.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition