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A Moveable Feast A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway
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A Moveable Feast Quotes Showing 61-90 of 237
“Do not worry. You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence you know.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Now that the bad weather had come, we could leave Paris for a while for a place where this rain would be snow coming down through the pines and covering the road and the high hillsides and at an altitude where we would hear it creak as we walked home at night. Below Les Avants there was a chalet where the pension was wonderful and where we would be together and have our books and at night be warm in bed together with the windows open and the stars bright. That was where we could go.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“But Paris was a very old city and we were young and nothing was simple there.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“In those days we did not trust anyone who had not been in the war, but we did not
completely trust anyone.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“During our last year in the mountains new people came deep into our lives and nothing was ever the same again. The winter of the avalanches was like a happy and innocent winter in childhood compared to the next winter, a nightmare winter disguised as the greatest fun of all, and the murderous summer that was to follow. It was that year that the rich showed up.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“My wife and I had called on Miss Stein, and she and the friend who lived with her had been very cordial and friendly and we had loved the big studio with the great paintings. I t was like one of the best rooms in the finest museum except there was a big fireplace and it was warm and comfortable and they gave you good things to eat and tea and natural distilled liqueurs made from purple plums, yellow plums or wild raspberries.
Miss Stein was very big but not tall and was heavily built like a peasant woman. She had beautiful eyes and a strong German-Jewish face that also could have been Friulano and she reminded me of a northern I talian peasant woman with her clothes, her mobile face and her lovely, thick, alive immigrant hair which she wore put up in the same way she had probably worn it in college. She talked all the time and at first it was about people and places.
Her companion had a very pleasant voice, was small, very dark, with her hair cut like Joan of Arc in the Boutet de Monvel illustrations and had a very hooked nose. She was working on a piece of needlepoint when we first met them and she worked on this and saw to the food and drink and talked to my wife. She made one conversation and listened to two and often interrupted the one she was not making. Afterwards she explained to me that she always talked to the wives. The wives, my wife and I felt, were tolerated. But we liked Miss Stein and her friend, although the friend was frightening. The paintings and the cakes and the eau-de-vie were truly wonderful. They seemed to like us too and treated us as though we were very good, well-mannered and promising children and I felt that they forgave us for being in love and being married - time would fix that - and when my wife invited them to tea, they accepted.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“The one who is doing his work and getting satisfaction from it is not the one the poverty is hard on.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“If you brought up Joyce twice, you would not be invited back.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“A girl came in the cafe and sat by herself at a table near the window. She was very pretty with a face fresh as a newly minted coin if they minted coins in smooth flesh with rain-freshened skin, and her hair was black as a crow's wing and cut sharply and diagonally across her cheek.
I looked at her and she disturbed me and made me very excited. I wished I could put her in the story, or anywhere, but she had placed herself so she could watch the street and the entry and I knew she was waiting for someone. So I went on writing.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“The story was writing itself and I was having a hard time keeping up with it.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Even when you have learned not to look at families nor listen to them and have learned not to answer letters, families have many ways of being dangerous.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
tags: family
“That was the end of the first part of Paris. Paris was never to be the same again although it was always Paris and you changed as it changed. We never went back to the Vorarlberg and neither did the rich.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Creation's probably overrated. After all, God made the world in only six days and rested on the seventh.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“When spring came, even the false spring, there were no problems except where to be happiest.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“You can either buy clothes or buy pictures," she said. "It's that simple. No one who is not very rich can do both. Pay no attention to your clothes and no attention at all to the mode, and buy your clothes for comfort and durability, and you will have the clothes money to buy pictures.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“اين داستانها متقاضی ندارند، ولی روزی آنها را خواهند فهمید؛ همان طور که برای نقاشیها هم این اتفاق می‌افتد. فقط به زمان احتیاج است و اعتماد به نفس...”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“We ate well and cheaply and we drank well and cheaply and we slept well and warm together and loved each other.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I remember the smell of the pines and the sleeping on the mattresses of beech leaves in the woodcutters' huts and the skiing through the forest following the tracks of hares and of foxes. In the high mountains above the tree line I remember following the track of a fox until I came in sight of him and watching him stand with his right forefoot raised and then go carefully to stop and then pounce, and the whiteness and the clutter of a ptarmigan bursting out of the snow and flying away and over the ridge.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I always worked until I had something done and I always stopped when I knew what was going to happen next. That way I could be sure of going on the next day. But sometimes when I was starting a new story and I could not get it going, I would sit in front of the fire and squeeze the peel of the little oranges into the edge of the flame and watch the sputter of blue that they made. I would stand and look out over the roofs of paris and think, 'Do not worry. You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.' So finally I would write one true sentence, and then go on from there. It was easy then because there was always one true sentence that I knew or had seen or had heard someone say. If I started to write elaborately, or like someone introducing or presenting something, I found that I could cut that scrollwork or ornament out and throw it away and start with the first true simple declarative sentence I had written. Up in that room I decided that I would write one story about each thing that I knew about. I was trying to do this all the time I was writing, and it was good and severe discipline.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“For luck you carried a horse chestnut and a rabbit’s foot in your right pocket. The fur had been worn off the rabbit’s foot long ago and the bones and the sinews were polished by the wear. The claws scratched in the lining of your pocket and you knew your luck was still there.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“And we'll never love anyone else but each other.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
tags: love
“Then I started to think in Lipp’s about when I had first been able to write a story about losing everything. It was up in Cortina d’Ampezzo when I had come back to join Hadley there after the spring skiing which I had to interrupt to go on assignment to Rhineland and the Ruhr. It was a very simple story called ‘Out of Season’ and I had omitted the real end of it which was that the old man hanged himself. This was omitted on my new theory that you could omit anything if you knew that you omitted and the omitted part would strengthen the story and make people feel something more than they understood.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“إذا واتاك الحظ بما فيه الكفاية لتعيش في باريس وأنت شاب, فإن ذكراها ستبقى معك أينما ذهبت طوال حياتك, لأن باريس وليمة متنقلة".”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“It was necessary that I leave Schruns and go to New York to rearrange publishers. I did my business in
New York and when I got back to Paris I should have caught the first train from the Gare de 1'Est that would take me down to Austria. But the girl I was in love with was in Paris then, and I did not take the first train, or the second or the third.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“For all of us who lived in Paris; we will never forget it because Paris is a moveable feast”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“How good a book is should be judged by the man who writes it by the excellence of the material that he eliminates.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I had already seen the end of fall come through boyhood, youth and young manhood, and in one place you could write about it better than in another. That was called transplanting yourself, I thought, and it could be as necessary with people as with other sorts of growing things.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“It was in that room too that I learned not to think about anything that I was writing from the time I stopped writing until I started again the next day. That way my subconscious would be working on it and at the same time I would be listening to other people and noticing everything, I hoped; learning, I hoped; and I would read so that I would not think about my work and make myself impotent to do it. Going down the stairs when you had worked well, and that needed luck as well as discipline, was a wonderful feeling and I was free then to walk anywhere in Paris.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“This book is fiction, but there is always a chance that such a work of fiction may throw some light on what has been written as fact.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“When spring came, even the false spring, there were no problems except where to be happiest. The only thing that could spoil a day was people and if you could keep from making engagements, each day had no limits. People were always the limiters of happiness except for the very few that were as good as spring itself.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast