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A Moveable Feast A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway
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A Moveable Feast Quotes Showing 31-60 of 237
“إن جميع الأمور الشريرة تبدأ من البراءة”
إرنست همنجواي, A Moveable Feast
“The only kind of writing is rewriting.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“أن تكون أصمّ صامتاً خير من أصمّ ثرثار”
إرنست همنجواي, A Moveable Feast
“You should only read what is truly good or what is frankly bad.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“But you knew there would always be the spring, as you knew the river would flow again after it was frozen. When the cold rains kept on and killed the spring, it was as though a young person had died for no reason.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I belong to this notebook and this pencil.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“In Dostoevsky there were things unbelievable and not to be believed, but some so true they changed you as you read them; frailty and madness, wickedness and saintliness, and the insanity of gambling were there to know as you knew the landscape and the roads in turgenev”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Work could cure almost anything”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Life had seemed so simple that morning when I had wakened and found the false spring…But Paris was a very old city and we were young and nothing was simple there, not even poverty, nor sudden money, nor the moonlight, nor right and wrong nor the breathing of someone who lay beside you in the moonlight.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I would walk along the quais when I had finished work or when I was trying to think something out. It was easier to think if I was walking and doing something or seeing people doing something that they understood.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“In those days, there was no money to buy books.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“He told me how he had first met her during the war and then lost her and won her back, and about their marriage and then about something tragic that had happened to them at St-Raphael about a year ago. This first version that he told me of Zelda . and a French naval aviator falling in love was truly a sad story and I believe it was a true story. Later he told me other versions of it as though trying them for use in a novel, but none was as sad as this first one and I always believed the first one, although any of them might have been true. They were better told each time; but they never hurt you the same way the first one did.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I loved her and I loved no one else and we had a lovely magic time while we were alone. I worked well and we made great trips, and I thought we were invulnerable again, and it wasn't until we were out of the mountains in late spring, and back in Paris, that the other thing started again.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“The mouth worried you until you knew him and then it worried you more.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“A girl came in the cafe and sat by herself at a table near the window. She was very pretty with a face fresh as a newly minted coin if they minted coins in smooth flesh with rain-freshened skin, and her hair black as a crow's wing and cut sharply and diagonally across her cheek.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“When I had finished the book I knew that no matter what Scott did, nor how he behaved, I must know it was like a sickness and be of any help I could to him and try to be a good friend. He had many good, good friends, more than anyone I knew. But I enlisted as one more, whether I could be of any use to him or not. If he could write a book as fine as The Great Gatsby I was sure that he could write an even better one. I did not know Zelda yet, and so I did not know the terrible odds that were against him. But we were to find them out soon enough.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I've been wondering about Dostoyevsky. How can a man write so badly, so unbelievably badly, and make you feel so deeply?”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“We need more true mystery in our lives Hem- he said. The completely unambitious writer and the really good unpublished poem are the things we lack most. There is of course the problem of sustenance”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“If I walked down by different streets to the Jardin du Luxembourg in the afternoon I could walk through the gardens and then go to the Musée du Luxembourg where the great paintings were that have now mostly been transferred to the Louvre and the Jeu de Paume. I went there nearly every day for the Cézannes and to see the Manets and the Monets and the other Impressionists that I had first come to know about in the Art Institute at Chicago. I was learning something from the painting of Cézanne that made writing simple true sentences far from enough to make the stories have the dimensions that I was trying to put in them. I was learning very much from him but I was not articulate enough to explain it to anyone. Besides it was a secret. But if the light was gone in the Luxembourg I would walk up through the gardens and stop in at the studio apartment where Gertrude Stein lived at 27 rue de Fleurus.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
“Part of you died each year when the leaves fell from the trees and their branches were bare against the wind and the cold, wintry light.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“To have come on all this new world of writing, with time to read in a city like Paris where there was a way of living well and working, no matter how poor you were, was like having a great treasure given to you. You could take your treasure with you when you traveled too, and in the mountains where we lived in Switzerland and Italy, until we found Schruns in the high valley in the Vorarlberg in Austria, there were always the books, so that you lived in the new world you had found, the snow and the forests and the glaciers and their winter problems and your high shelter in the Hotel Taube in the village in the day time, and at night you could live in the other wonderful world the Russian writers were giving you.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“In a city like Paris where there was a way of living well and working, no matter how poor you were, was like having a great treasure given to you.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Zelda was very beautiful and was tanned a lovely gold colour and her hair was a beautiful dark gold and she was very friendly. Her hawk's eyes were clear and calm. I knew everything was all right and was going to turn out well in the end when she leaned forward and said to me, telling me her great secret, 'Ernest, don't you think Al Jolson is greater than Jesus?'
Nobody thought anything of it at the time. It was only Zelda's secret that she shared with me, as a hawk might share something with a man. But hawks do not share. Scott did not write anything any more that was good until after he knew that she was insane.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“I did not understand them but they did not have any mystery, and when I understood them they meant nothing to me. I was sorry about this but there was nothing I could do about it.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“Пътувай само с човек, когото обичаш.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“When we came back to Paris it was clear and cold and lovely.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“There is never any ending to Paris, and the memory of each person who has lived in it differs from that of any other. Paris was always worth it, and you received return for whatever you brought to it…”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“This was omitted on my new theory that you could omit anything if you knew that you omitted and the omitted part would strengthen the story and make people feel something more than they understood.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
“We both touched wood on the cafe table and the waiter came to see what it was we wanted. But what we wanted he, nor anyone else, nor knocking on wood or on marble, as this cafe table-top was, could ever bring us. But we did not know it that night and we were very happy.”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast