The Journals of Constant Waterman Quotes

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The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It by Matthew Goldman
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“People no longer live by sun and moon, by wind and stars, but by some slyly contrived conventions known as clocks and calendars.”
Matthew Goldman, The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It
“One takes what the river offers, both good and bad. The joy of living by running water far outweighs the sorrow.”
Matthew Goldman, The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It
“Keep your hand on the helm.”
Matthew Goldman, The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It
“What is time to a water rat? What is time to the river? Only we humans obsess over days and minutes, hours and seasons.”
Matthew Goldman, The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It
“Living aboard one's sailboat and having neither house nor vehicle nor job, and needing none, would be hubris—the most arrogant presumption—and therefore suitable punishable by the gods. One would be drowned by Poseidon early on and die extremely happy.”
Matthew Goldman, The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It
“Be patient with your boaters and let them rant. Most of them will get over it come December.”
Matthew Goldman, The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It
“Those are the things in the water that keep the moon in orbit. I've never quite understood just how they work. You mostly can't see the moon during the day, so they can't be very efficient.”
Matthew Goldman, The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It
tags: tides
“As Thoreau remarked, beware of any enterprise that cannot be undertaken in one’s old clothes.”
Matthew Goldman, The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It
“more inclined to fool about on one of my small boats than work for a living. It may not be remunerative but it’s generally rewarding.”
Matthew Goldman, The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It
“I still loved to sail and cared even less about what the civilized world thought about me.”
Matthew Goldman, The Journals of Constant Waterman: Paddling, Poling, and Sailing for the Love of It