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The Age of Reason The Age of Reason by Jean-Paul Sartre
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The Age of Reason Quotes Showing 1-25 of 25
“She smiled and said with an ecstatic air: "It shines like a little diamond",
"What does?"
"This moment. It is round, it hangs in empty space like a little diamond; I am eternal.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“The individual's duty is to do what he wants to do, to think whatever he likes, to be accountable to no one but himself, to challenge every idea and every person.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“Perhaps its inevitable, perhaps one has to choose between being nothing at all and impersonating what one is.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“He walked on in silence, the solitary sound of his footsteps echoing in his head, as in a deserted street, at dawn. His solitude was so complete, beneath a lovely sky as mellow and serene as a good conscience, amid that busy throng, that he was amazed at his own existence; he must be somebody else's nightmare, and whoever it was would certainly awaken soon.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“It's just what people do when they're getting old, when they're sick of themselves and their life; they think of money and take care of themselves.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“All I want is' - and he uttered the final words through clenched teeth and with a sort of shame - 'to retain my freedom.'

I should myself have thought,' said Jacques, 'that freedom consisted in frankly confronting situations into which one had deliberately entered, and accepting all one's responsibilities. But that, no doubt, is not your view.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“But no: he was empty, he was confronted by a vast anger, a desperate anger, he saw it and could almost have touched it. But it was inert - if it were to live and find expression and suffer, he must lend it his own body. It was other people's anger. "Swine!" He clenched his fists, he strode along, but nothing came, the anger remained external to himself.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“Perhaps it’s inevitable; perhaps one has to choose between being nothing at all, or impersonating what one is. That would be terrible,’ he said to himself: ‘it would mean that we were duped by nature.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“He yawned; he had finished the day, and he had also finished with his youth. Various tried and proved rules of conduct had already discreetly offered him their services: disillusioned epicureanism, smiling tolerance, resignation, flat seriousness, stoicism--all the aids whereby a man may savor, minute by minute, like a connoisseur, the failure of a life... 'I have attained the age of reason.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“Oppressed with countless little daily cares, he had waited... For an act. A free, considered act; that should pledge his whole life, and stand at the beginning of a new existence.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“With older people, it's quite different. They're reliable, they show you what to do, and there's solidity in their affection.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“I've lived the life of a man without teeth, he thought about it. A life of a man without teeth. I've never bitten, I've been waiting, keeping myself for later - and now I've just ascertained that I don't have teeth anymore.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“If... if I didn't try to get my life moving on my own account, I should think it just absurd to go on living.'
A look of smiling obstinacy had come into Marcelle's face.
'Yes, yes - it's your vice.'
'It's not a vice. It's how I'm made.'
'Why aren't other people made like that, if it isn't a vice?'
'They are, only they don't know it.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“Well, you're free without wanting to be,' he explained, 'it just happens so, that's all. But Mathieu's freedom is based on reason.'
'I still don't understand,' said Lola, shaking her head.
'Well, he doesn't care a curse about his apartment: he lives there just as he would live anywhere else, and I've got the feeling that he doesn't care much about his girl. He stays with her because he must sleep with someone. His freedom isn't visible, it's inside him.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“But you looked much more like a fellow who had just realised that he has been living on ideas that don’t pay.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“Her smiles, her mimicries, all the words she uttered were addressed to herself through him.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“I go, I go away, I walk, I wander, and everywhere I go I bear my shell with me, I remain at home in my room, among my books, I do not approach an inch nearer to Marrakech or Timbuktu. Even if I took a train, a boat, or a motor-bus, if I went to Morocco for my holiday, if I suddenly arrived at Marrakech, I should be always in my room, at home. And if I walked in the squares and in the sooks, if I gripped an Arab's shoulder, to feel Marrakech in his person - well, that Arab would be at Marrakech, not I : I should still be seated in my room, placid and meditative as is my chosen life, two thousand miles away from the Moroccan and his burnoose. In my room. Forever.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“If I didn't try to assume responsibility for my own existence, it would seem utterly absurd to go on existing.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“What a torment it is not to be rich! It gets one into such abject situations.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“When a man gets drunk he gets sentimental. That's what I wanted to avoid.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“Love was not something to be felt, not a particular emotion, nor yet a particular shade of feeling, it was much more like a lowering curse on the horizon, a precursor of disaster.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
tags: love
“I'm not obstinate, I'm highly strung: I don't know how to let myself go. I must always think of what is happening to me - it's a form of self-protection.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“Qarjet e të rriturve ishin si një katastrofë mistike, diçka si lotët që derdh Zoti për ligësinë e njerëzve.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“J'aurai cru, moi, dit Jacques, que la liberté consistait à regarder en face les situations où l'on s'est mis de plein gré et à accepter toutes ses responsabilités. Mais çe n'est sans doute pas ton avis : tu condamnes la société capitaliste , et pourtant tu es fonctionnaire dans cette société, tu affiches une sympathie de principe pour les communistes : mais tu te gardes bien de t'engager, tu n 'as jamais voté. Tu méprises la classe bourgeoise et pourtant tu es bourgeois, fils et frère de bourgeois et tu vis comme un bourgeois.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason
“Espera tanto tempo. Os últimos anos tinham sido uma vigília.
Esperara através de mil e uma preocupações quotidianas.
Naturalmente durante esse tempo andara atrás de mulheres, viajara e ganhara a vida. Mas através de tudo isso a sua única preocupação fora manter-se disponível. Para uma acção. Um acto.
Um acto livre e reflectido que acarretaria o destino da sua vida e seria o início de uma nova existência. Nunca pudera prender-se definitivamente a um amor, a um prazer, nunca fora realmennte infeliz; sempre lhe parecera estar algures, não ter ainda nascido completamente.
Esperava. E durante esse tempo, devagar, sub-repticiamente os anos tinham chegado, e tinham-no envolvido.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason