Childe Harold's Pilgrimage Quotes

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Childe Harold's Pilgrimage Childe Harold's Pilgrimage by Lord Byron
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Childe Harold's Pilgrimage Quotes Showing 1-14 of 14
“There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,
There is a rapture on the lonely shore,
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep Sea, and music in its roar:
I love not Man the less, but Nature more,
From these our interviews, in which I steal
From all I may be, or have been before,
To mingle with the Universe, and feel
What I can ne’er express, yet cannot all conceal.”
Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
“Then stirs the feeling infinite, so felt
In solitude, where we are least alone.”
George Gordon Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
“I live not in myself, but I become
Portion of that around me: and to me
High mountains are a feeling, but the hum
of human cities torture.”
George Gordon Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
“On with the dance! let joy be unconfin'd”
George Gordon Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
tags: joy
“On with the dance! let joy be unconfin'd;
No sleep till morn, when Youth and Pleasure meet
To chase the Glowing Hours with Flying feet.”
Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
“There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore.”
George Gordon Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
“and what is writ, is writ,
Would it were worthier! but I am not now
That which I have been”
George Gordon Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
“Can tyrants but by tyrants conquered be”
George Gordon Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
“8.
"For who would trust the seeming sighs
Of wife or paramour?
Fresh feres will dry the bright blue eyes
We late saw streaming o'er.
For pleasures past I do not grieve,
Nor perils gathering near;
My greatest grief is that I leave
No thing that claims a tear.

9.
"And now I'm in the world alone,
Upon the wide, wide sea:
But why should I for others groan,
When none will sigh for me?
Perchance my dog will whine in vain,
Till fed by stranger hands;
But long ere I come back again,
He'd tear me where he stands.

10.
"With thee, my bark, I'll swiftly go
Athwart the foaming brine;
Nor care what land thou bear'st me to,
So not again to mine.
Welcome, welcome, ye dark blue waves!
And when you fail my sight,
Welcome, ye deserts, and ye caves!
My native Land — Good Night!”
Lord Byron, Lord Byron: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
“Ye stars! which are the poetry of heaven!
If in your bright leaves we would read the fate
Of men and empires,-'tis to be forgiven,
That in our aspirations to be great,
Our destinies o'erleap their mortal state,
And claim a kindred with you; for ye are
A beauty and a mystery, and create
In us such love and reverence from afar,
That fortune, fame, power, life, have named themselves a star.”
George Gordon Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
“But pomp and power alone are woman's care,
And where these are light Eros finds a feere;
Maidens, like moths, are ever caught by glare,
And Mammon wins his way where Seraphs might despair.”
George Gordon Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
tags: women
“The moon is up, and yet it is not night,
The sun as yet divides the day with her.”
Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
“Though sluggards deem it but a foolish chase,
And marvel men should quit their easy chair,
The toilsome way, and long, long leagues to trace,
Oh! there is sweetness in the mountain air,
And life that bloated Ease can never hope to share.”
George Gordon Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
“Man!
Thou pendulum betwixt a smile and tear.”
Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
tags: poetry