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Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality by Richard Rohr
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Things Hidden Quotes Showing 1-25 of 25
“there is no path to peace, but peace itself is the path.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“Think of the many, many stories about God choosing people. There are Moses, Abraham, and Sarah; there are David, Jeremiah, Gideon, Samuel, Jonah, and Isaiah. There is Israel itself. Much later there are Peter and Paul, and, most especially, Mary.

God is always choosing people. First impressions aside, God is not primarily choosing them for a role or a task, although it might appear that way. God is really choosing them to be God’s self in this world, each in a unique situation. If they allow themselves to experience being chosen, being a beloved, being somehow God’s presence in the world, they invariably communicate that same chosenness to others. And thus the Mystery passes on from age to age. Yes, we do have roles and tasks in this world, but finally they are all the same—to uniquely be divine love in a way that no one else can or will.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“Our temptation now and always is not to trust in God but to trust in our faith tradition of trusting in God.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“forgiveness always heals; it does not matter whether you are Hindu, Buddhist, Catholic or Jewish. Forgiveness is one of the patterns that is always true, it is part of The Story. There is no specifically Catholic way to feed the hungry or to steward the earth.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“The mystery of presence is that encounter wherein the self-disclosure of one evokes a deeper life in the other. There is nothing you need to “think” or understand to be present; it is all about giving and receiving right now, and it is not done in the mind. It is actually a transference and sharing of Being, and will be experienced as grace, gratuity and inner-groundedness. Thus there is always a great leap of inner authenticity that is associated with true mutual presence, because in being received graciously, we are able to receive ourselves at an ever-deeper level yet recognize that we are both part of something Greater itself. It gives one great happiness and deep joy. We really are socially contagious human beings, but we settle for “human doings.” It is at the being level that life is most vitally transferred.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“The best criticism of the bad is the practice of the better.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“The trouble is that we have made the Bible into a bunch of ideas—about which we can be right or wrong—rather than an invitation to a new set of eyes. Even worse, many of those ideas are the same, old tired ones, mirroring the reward and punishment system of the dominant culture, so that most people don’t even expect anything good or anything new from the momentous revelation that we call the Bible. The”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“If religion cannot find a meaning for human suffering, humanity is in major trouble. All healthy religion shows you what to do with your pain. Great religion shows you what to do with the absurd, the tragic, the nonsensical, the unjust. If we do not transform our pain, we will most assuredly transmit it. If”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“Mystery is not something that you cannot understand, but it is something that is endlessly understandable! It is multilayered and pregnant with meaning and never totally admits to closure or resolution.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“I would ask you to consider the crucifix as a homeopathic image, like those medicines that give you just enough of the disease so you could develop a resistance and be healed from it. The cross dramatically reveals the problem of ignorant killing, to inoculate us against doing the same thing.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“In many ways what we’re seeing as we explore the Bible is an observing of the development of human consciousness and human readiness for God. That’s why we do see some difference between the earlier and later Scriptures: There’s been a development in consciousness. In”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“the eyes with which you will look back at God will be the same eyes with which God first looked at you.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“This marvelous anthology of books and letters called the Bible is all for the sake of astonishment! It’s for divine transformation (theosis), not intellectual or “small-self” coziness.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“The British-American author D.H. Lawrence said that “the world fears a new experience more than anything. Because a new experience displaces so many old experiences.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“true biblical faith leaves you very vulnerable to reality, because now there is no place to hide. No wonder we prefer abstractions over the actual! We can hide behind abstractions, but Incarnation leaves you both utterly exposed and constantly invited.   incorporation”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“I would almost describe spirituality as a concern for one’s being, one’s inner motivation and attitude, one’s real inner Source, as opposed to any primary concern for one’s “doing.” Doing will always take care of itself when your being is right. It is our preoccupation with external forms and successes that makes us superficial, judgmental, split off and often just downright wrong—without knowing it.   god”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“God does not change, but our readiness for such a God takes a long time to change.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“We must approach the Scriptures with humility and patience, with our own agenda out of the way, and allow the Spirit to stir the deeper meaning for us. Otherwise we only hear what we already agree with or what we have decided to look for! Isn’t that rather obvious? As Paul will say, “We must teach not in the way philosophy is taught, but in the way the Spirit teaches us: We must teach spiritual things spiritually” (1 Corinthians 2:13). As Tobin Hart says, this mode of teaching is much more about transformation than information. That changes the entire focus and goal.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“True transcendence always includes the previous stages and does not dismiss them or punish them, as most reforms and revolutions have done in history. This is true reconciliation, healing or forgiveness and always characterizes mature believers. They afterward seem to thank God for the pain and the trial.   good”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“Good art seems absolutely essential to healthy religion.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“With a lack of mysticism and any contemplative mind in some denominations, I find that many Christians still have no knowledge of the soul's objective union with God (1 John 3:2, 2 Peter 1:4). They often actually fight me on it, quoting to me that "all things human are evil and depraved" or "humans are like piles of manure, covered over by Christ." Such a negative starting point will have a very hard time creating loving or responsive people, just as when Rome tells homosexual persons that they are "intrinsically disordered". How do you ever undo such foundational damnation?”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“Good poetry doesn’t try to define an experience as much as it tries to give you the experience itself, just as good liturgy should do. It tries to awaken your own seeing, hearing and knowing. It does not give you the conclusion as much as teach you a process whereby you can know for yourself. It does not “overexplain and destroy astonishment.” Jesus does the same, particularly with the parables, and even says so at both the beginning and end of his parabolic discourse (see Matthew 13:13, 51–52). That’s why the long standing language of religion was poetry, aphorism and sacred storytelling, never merely prose or linear doctrines.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“Great spirituality, on the other hand, is always seeking a balance between opposites, a very subtle but creative balance. As William Johnston, s.j., once said, “Faith is that breakthrough into that deep realm of the soul which accepts paradox with humility.”2 When you go to one side or the other too much, you find yourself either overly righteous or overly skeptical and cynical. There must be a healthy middle, and I hope that is what we are looking for here, as we try to hold both the needed light and the necessary darkness.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“Our unwillingness, or our inability, to thin-slice the texts and then discern the tangents has created widespread fundamentalist Christianity, Judaism and Islam, which, ironically, usually miss the “fundamentals”! If you do not know the direction and the momentum, you will not recognize the backpedaling. You will end up making very accidental themes into “fundamentals” while missing the biggies! One dot is not wisdom: You can prove anything you want from a single Scripture quote.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“Abstractions offer the ego lots of payoffs: We can remain seemingly in control; we can live in our heads; we can avoid loving in general or loving anyone in particular; we can avoid all humor, paradox and freedom. Even God is not free to act outside of our abstract theological conclusions, yet that is exactly what God does every time God forgives and shows mercy, which is not rational at all. I”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality