Eleven Rings Quotes

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Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success by Phil Jackson
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Eleven Rings Quotes Showing 1-30 of 73
“The most we can hope for is to create the best possible conditions for success, then let go of the outcome. The ride is a lot more fun that way.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“When the mind is allowed to relax, inspiration often follows.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Think lightly of yourself and think deeply of the world. MIYAMOTO MUSASHI”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“As a leader your job is to do everything in your power to create the perfect conditions for success by benching your ego and inspiring your team to play the game the right way. But at some point, you need to let go and turn yourself over to the basketball gods. The soul of success is surrendering to what is.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“STAGE 1—shared by most street gangs and characterized by despair, hostility, and the collective belief that “life sucks.” STAGE 2—filled primarily with apathetic people who perceive themselves as victims and who are passively antagonistic, with the mind-set that “my life sucks.” Think The Office on TV or the Dilbert comic strip. STAGE 3—focused primarily on individual achievement and driven by the motto “I’m great (and you’re not).” According to the authors, people in organizations at this stage “have to win, and for them winning is personal. They’ll outwork and outthink their competitors on an individual basis. The mood that results is a collection of ‘lone warriors.’” STAGE 4—dedicated to tribal pride and the overriding conviction that “we’re great (and they’re not).” This kind of team requires a strong adversary, and the bigger the foe, the more powerful the tribe. STAGE 5—a rare stage characterized by a sense of innocent wonder and the strong belief that “life is great.” (See Bulls, Chicago, 1995–98.)”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“If you live in the river you should make friends with the crocodile. INDIAN PROVERB (PUNJABI)”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“That’s why at the start of every season I always encouraged players to focus on the journey rather than the goal. What matters most is playing the game the right way and having the courage to grow, as human beings as well as basketball players. When you do that, the ring takes care of itself.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Bill Russell, the Boston Celtics great who won more championship rings as a player than anyone else (eleven), revealed in his memoir, Second Wind, that he sometimes secretly rooted for the opposing team during big games because if they were doing well, it meant he would have a more heightened experience.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Fall down seven times. Stand up eight. JAPANESE PROVERB”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“The way you do anything is the way you do everything. TOM WAITS”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Feelings come and go like clouds in a windy sky. Conscious breathing is my anchor. THICH NHAT HANH”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“To inspire the players, I adapted a quote from Walt Whitman and taped it on their lockers before the first game of the playoffs, against the Miami Heat. "Henceforth we seek not good fortune, we are ourselves good fortune".”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“When we called time-out with twenty-five seconds to go,” he re-called, “we went into the huddle and Phil said, ‘Michael, I want you to take the last shot,’ and Michael said, ‘You know, Phil, I don’t feel comfortable in these situations. So maybe we ought to go in another direction.’ Then Scottie said, ‘You know, Phil, Michael said in his commercial that he’s been asked to do this twenty-six times and he’s failed. So why don’t we go to Steve.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings
“Zen teacher Lewis Richmond tells the story of hearing Shunryu Suzuki sum up Buddhism in two words. Suzuki had just finished giving a talk to a group of Zen students when someone in the audience said, “You’ve been talking about Buddhism for nearly an hour, and I haven’t been able to understand a thing you said. Could you say one thing about Buddhism I can understand?” After the laughter died down, Suzuki replied calmly, “Everything changes.” Those words, Suzuki said, contain the basic truth of existence: Everything is always in flux. Until you accept this, you won’t be able to find true equanimity.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Management guru Stephen Covey tells this old Japanese tale about a samurai warrior and his three sons: The samurai wanted to teach his sons about the power of teamwork. So he gave each of them an arrow and asked them to break it. No problem. Each son did it easily. Then the samurai gave them a bundle of three arrows bound together and asked them to repeat the process. But none of them could. “That’s your lesson,” the samurai said. “If you three stick together, you will never be defeated.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“The unconscious mind is a terrific solver of complex problems when the conscious mind is busy elsewhere or, perhaps better yet, not overtaxed at all.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“The privilege of a lifetime is being who you are. JOSEPH CAMPBELL”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Three aspects of Zen have been critical to me as a leader: 1. GIVING UP CONTROL Suzuki writes, “If you want to obtain perfect calmness in your zazen, you should not be bothered by the various images you find in your mind. Let them come and let them go. Then they will be under control.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“TRUSTING THE MOMENT Most of us spend the bulk of our time caught up in thoughts of the past or the future—which can be dangerous if your job is winning basketball games. Basketball takes place at such a lightning pace that it’s easy to make mistakes and get obsessed with what just happened or what might happen next, which distracts you from the only thing that really matters—this very moment.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“LIVING WITH COMPASSION One aspect of Buddhism that I found to be especially compelling was the teachings on compassion. The Buddha was known as the “compassionate one,” and according to religion scholars, his moral teachings bear a close resemblance to those of Jesus, who told his followers at the Last Supper: “This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you. No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.” In a similar vein, the Buddha said, “Just as a mother would protect her only child at the risk of her own life, even so, cultivate a boundless heart towards all beings. Let your thoughts of boundless love pervade the whole world.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Edwin Markham’s “Outwitted”: He drew the circle that shut me out— Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout. But love and I had the wit to win: We drew a circle that took him in!”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Unfazed,”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings
“Basketball is a great mystery. You can do everything right. You can have the perfect mix of talent and the best system of offense in the game. You can devise a foolproof defensive strategy and prepare your players for every possible eventuality. But if the players don’t have a sense of oneness as a group, your efforts won’t pay off. And the bond that unites a team can be so fragile, so elusive.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Maslow puts it, “The great lesson from the true mystics . . . [is] that the sacred is in the ordinary, that it is to be found in one’s daily life, in one’s neighbors, friends, and family, in one’s backyard.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“It’s more fun to be a pirate than to join the Navy. STEVE JOBS”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Suzuki had just finished giving a talk to a group of Zen students when someone in the audience said, “You’ve been talking about Buddhism for nearly an hour, and I haven’t been able to understand a thing you said. Could you say one thing about Buddhism I can understand?” After the laughter died down, Suzuki replied calmly, “Everything changes.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“There’s a Zen saying I often cite that goes, “Before enlightenment, chop wood, carry water. After enlightenment, chop wood, carry water.” The point: Stay focused on the task at hand rather than dwelling on the past or worrying about the future.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Only to the extent that we expose ourselves over and over to annihilation can that which is indestructible be found in us.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities; in the expert’s mind there are few.”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success
“Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned. THE BUDDHA”
Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success

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