Their Finest Hour Quotes

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Their Finest Hour (The Second World War, #2) Their Finest Hour by Winston S. Churchill
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Their Finest Hour Quotes Showing 1-30 of 30
“Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end.
But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“Doubts [can] be swept away only by deeds.”
Winston Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“Success always demands a greater effort.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“When you have got a thing where you want, it is a good thing to leave it where it is.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say: ‘This was their finest hour.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“Strange as it may seem, the Air Force, except in the air, is the least mobile of all the services. A squadron can reach its destination in a few hours, but its establishments, depots, fuel, spare parts, and workshops take many weeks, and even months, to develop.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“A wit wrote ten years ago: “The leaders of thought have reached the horizons of human reason, but all the wires are down, and they can only communicate with us by unintelligible signals.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“But now there was a classic example of “Order, counter-order, disorder”.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“In total war it is quite impossible to draw any precise line between military and non-military problems.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“Attempts were made in 1941 to design a similar proximity fuze, using a tiny Radar set arranged to explode the warhead when the projectile passed near the aircraft. Successful preliminary experiments were made, but before this fuze was developed in England the Americans, to whom we imparted our knowledge, actually succeeded not only in perfecting the instrument but in reducing its size so much that the whole thing could be put into the head not merely of a rocket but of a shell. These so-called “Proximity Fuzes”, made in the United States, were used in great numbers in the last year of the war,”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“Power, for the sake of lording it over fellow-creatures or adding to personal pomp, is rightly judged base. But power in a national crisis, when a man believes he knows what orders should be given, is a blessing.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“Half-mast the castle banner droops, The Laird’s lament was played yestreen, An’ mony a widowed cottar wife Is greetin’ at her shank aleen. In Freedom’s cause, for ane that fa’s, We’ll glean the glens an’ send them three, To clip the reivin’ eagle’s claws An’ drook his feathers i’ the sea. For gallant loons, in brochs an’ toons,
Are leavin’ shop an’ yaird an’ mill, A’ keen to show baith friend an’ foe Auld Scotland counts for something still.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“Germany could not gain complete air superiority unless she could knock out our Air Force, and the aircraft industries, some vital portions of which are concentrated at Coventry and Birmingham.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“the”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“Past experience carries with its advantages the drawback that things never happen the same way again.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“Drake was finishing his game of bowls;”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“The admiration of the whole country was given to London, and all the other great cities in the land braced themselves to take their bit as and when it came and not to be outdone. Indeed, many persons seemed envious of London’s distinction, and quite a number came up from the country in order to spend a night or two in town, share the risk, and “see the fun”. We had to check this tendency for administrative reasons. ***”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“if the issue were presented to the British as a naked trading away of British possessions for sake of the fifty destroyers it would certainly encounter vehement opposition.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“During this period I usually managed to take two afternoons a week in the areas under attack in Kent or Sussex in order to see for myself what was happening.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“There is an age-long argument about ships versus forts. Nelson said that a six-gun battery could fight a 100-gun ship-of-the-line. Mr. Balfour, in the Dardanelles inquiry, said in 1916: “If the ship has guns which can hit the fort at ranges where the fort cannot reply, the duel is not necessarily so unequal.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“When Molotov,” said the Marshal, “went to see Ribbentrop in Berlin in November of 1940 you got wind of it and sent an air raid.” I nodded. “When the alarm sounded Ribbentrop led the way down many flights of stairs to a deep shelter sumptuously furnished. When he got inside the raid had begun. He shut the door and said to Molotov: ‘Now here we are alone together. Why should we not divide?’ Molotov said: ‘What will England say?’ ‘England,’ said Ribbentrop, ‘is finished. She is no more use as a Power.’ ‘If that is so,’ said Molotov, ‘why are we in this shelter, and whose are these bombs which fall?’” ***”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“It appears that the German losses in some of the principal combats were a good deal less than we thought at the time, and that reports on both sides were materially exaggerated.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“At the summit the stamina and valour of our fighter pilots remained unconquerable and supreme. Thus Britain was saved. Well might I say in the House of Commons: “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“In war what you don’t dislike is not usually what the enemy does.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“If the present,” I said a few weeks later, “tries to sit in judgment on the past it will lose the future.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“Depend upon it,” said Dr. Johnson, “when a man knows he is going to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“kill not only men, but ideas.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“depended. On this point we should never have given way, but the refusal would have been bitterly resented by our struggling Ally, and would have poisoned all our relations. It was even with an actual sense of relief that some of our high commanders addressed themselves to our new and grimly simplified problem. As”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“For every reason therefore we must develop the storm troop or Commando idea. I have asked for five thousand parachutists, and we must also have at least ten thousand of these small “bands of brothers” who will be capable of lightning action.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour
“History with its flickering lamp stumbles along the trail of the past, trying to reconstruct its scenes, to revive its echoes, and kindle with pale gleams the passion of former days. What is the worth of all this? The only guide to a man is his conscience; the only shield to his memory is the rectitude and sincerity of his actions. It is very imprudent to walk through life without this shield, because we are so often mocked by the failure of our hopes and the upsetting of our calculations; but with this shield, however the fates may play, we march always in the ranks of honour.”
Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour