Principle-Centered Leadership Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Principle-Centered Leadership Principle-Centered Leadership by Stephen R. Covey
15,240 ratings, 4.10 average rating, 158 reviews
Open Preview
Principle-Centered Leadership Quotes Showing 1-30 of 48
“ماذا سيحدث إذا أصغيت إلى الآخر ؟ سيتغير الأمر برمته : لقد أصغى أحدهم إلى , وأعتقد أن كلماتي راقت له , صحيح أنه لم يبد موافقة أو عدم موافقة , إلا أنه كان ينصت , حتى إنه أشعرني بأنه يرى العالم كما أنظر إلية , وهكذا فقد شعرت أنني أصغى إلى نفسي وبدأت أحوز الثقة في نفسي”
ستيفن ر. كوفي, القيادة المرتكزة على مبادئ
“Effective people lead their lives and manage their relationships around principles; ineffective people attempt to manage their time around priorities and their tasks around goals. Think effectiveness with people; efficiency with things.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“You see your competition as a learning source, as friends who can keep you sharp and teach you where your weaknesses are.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Trust at the interpersonal level. Trustworthiness is the foundation of trust. Trust is the emotional bank account between two people that enables them to have a win-win performance agreement. If two people trust each other, based on the trustworthiness of each other, they can then enjoy clear communication, empathy, synergy, and productive interdependency. If one is incompetent, training and development can help. But if one has a character flaw, he or she must make and keep promises to increase internal security, improve skills, and rebuild relationships of trust. Trust—or the lack of it—is at the root of success or failure in relationships and in the bottom-line results of business, industry, education, and government.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Trust—or the lack of it—is at the root of success or failure in relationships and in the bottom-line results of business, industry, education, and government.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Often these approaches reflect the inverse of the habits of effective people. In fact, my brother, John Covey, who is a master teacher, sometimes refers to them as the seven habits of ineffective people: Be reactive: doubt yourself and blame others. Work without any clear end in mind. Do the urgent thing first. Think win/lose. Seek first to be understood. If you can’t win, compromise. Fear change and put off improvement. Just as personal victories precede public victories when effective people progress along the maturity continuum, so also do private failures portend embarrassing public failures when ineffective people regress along an”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“end of the continuum are the ineffective people who transfer responsibility by blaming other people, events, or the environment—anything or anybody “out there” so that they are not responsible for results. If I blame you, in effect I have empowered you. I have given my power to your weakness. Then I can create evidence that supports my perception that you are the problem. At the upper end of the continuum toward increasing effectiveness is self-awareness: “I know my tendencies, I know the scripts or programs that are in me, but I am not those scripts. I can rewrite my scripts.” You are aware that you are the creative force of your life. You are not the victim of conditions or conditioning. You can choose your response to any situation, to any person. Between what happens to you and your response is a degree of freedom. And the more you exercise that freedom, the larger it will become. As you work in your circle of influence and exercise that freedom, gradually you will stop being a “hot reactor” (meaning there’s little separation between stimulus and response) and start being a cool, responsible chooser—no matter what your genetic makeup, no matter how you were raised, no matter what your childhood experiences were or what the environment is. In your freedom to choose your response lies the power to achieve growth and happiness.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Associated with Habit 5: Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood is the endowment of courage balanced with consideration. Does it take courage and consideration to not be understood first? Think about it. Think about the problems you face. You tend to think, “You need to understand me, but you don’t understand. I understand you, but you don’t understand me. So let me tell you my story first, and then you can say what you want.” And the other person says, “Okay, I’ll try to understand.” But the whole time they’re “listening,” they’re preparing their reply. They’re just pretending to listen, selectively listening. When you show your home movies or tell some chapter of your autobiography—“Let me tell you my experience”—the other person is tuned out unless he feels understood. What happens when you truly listen to another person? The whole relationship is transformed: “Someone started listening to me, and they seemed to savor my words. They didn’t agree or disagree, they just were listening, and I felt as if they were seeing how I saw the world. And in that process, I found myself listening to myself. I started to feel a worth in myself.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“The primary human endowments are 1) self-awareness or self-knowledge; 2) imagination and conscience; and 3) volition or willpower. The secondary endowments are 4) an abundance mentality; 5) courage and consideration; and 6) creativity. The seventh endowment is self-renewal. All are unique human endowments; animals don’t possess any of them. But they are all on a continuum of low to high levels.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“your freedom to choose your response lies the power to achieve growth and happiness.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“! The key to growth is to learn to make promises and to keep them”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Making and keeping these three universal resolutions will accelerate our self-development and, potentially, increase our influence with others.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Positive personality traits, while often essential for success, constitute secondary greatness. To focus on personality before character is to try to grow the leaves without the roots”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“One of the most important commitments in a family or a business is never to bad-mouth. Always be loyal to those who are absent, if you want to retain those who are present”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“In your freedom to choose your response lies the power to achieve growth and happiness.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“exercise I recommend is to do two things daily: 1) gain perspective, and 2) make some decisions and commitments in light of that perspective. People have the capability to transcend themselves, to rise above the moment and see what’s happening and what should be happening. We need to take time to plan and make some decisions in light of this understanding. As Goethe put it, “Things which matter most must never be at the mercy of things which matter least.” Careful planning helps us maintain a sense of perspective, purpose, and ordered priorities.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Quality begins with me. And I need to make my own decisions based on carefully selected principles and values.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Never make a promise we will not keep. Make meaningful promises, resolutions and commitments to do better and to be better—and share these with a loved one. Use self-knowledge and be very selective about the promises we make. Consider promises as a measure of our integrity and faith in ourselves. Remember that our personal integrity or self-mastery is the basis for our success with others. One simple practice can propel you forward in your long-term quest for excellence and in your struggle for true maturity (courage balanced with consideration) and for integrity. It is this: Before every test of your new habit or”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Edwin Hubbell Chapin said: “Fashion is the science of appearances, and it inspires one with the desire to seem rather than to be.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“The ethical person looks at every economic transaction as a test of his or her moral stewardship. That’s why humility is the mother of all other virtues—because it promotes stewardship. Then everything else that is good will work through you. But if you get into pride—into “my will, my agenda, my wants”—then you must rely totally upon your own strengths. You’re not in touch with what Jung calls “the collective unconscious”—the power of the larger ethos that unleashes energy through your work.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Double-mindedness, having two conflicting motives or interests, inevitably sets us at war with ourselves—and an internal civil war often breaks out into war with others. The opposite of double-mindedness is self-unity or integrity. We achieve integrity through the dedication of ourselves to selfless service of others.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“The key to growth is to learn to make promises and to keep them. Self-denial is an essential element in overcoming all three temptations. “One secret act of self-denial, one sacrifice of inclination to duty, is worth all the mere good thoughts, warm feelings, passionate prayers, in which idle men indulge themselves,” said John Henry Newman. “The worst education which teaches self-denial is better than the best which teaches everything else and not that,” said Sterling. Making and keeping these three universal resolutions will accelerate our self-development and, potentially, increase our influence with others.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Self-mastery and self-discipline are the roots of good relationships with others.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Real empowerment comes from having both the principles and the practices understood and applied at all levels of the organization. Practices are the what to do’s, specific applications that fit specific circumstances. Principles are the why to do’s, the elements upon which applications or practices are built. Without understanding the principles of a given task, people become incapacitated when the situation changes and different practices are required to be successful. When training people, we often teach skills and practices, the specific how to of a given task. But when we teach practices without principles, we tend to make people dependent on us or others for further instruction and direction. Principle-centered leaders are men and women of character who work with competence “on farms” with “seed and soil” on the basis of natural principles and build those principles into the center of their lives, into the center of their relationships with others, into the center of their agreements and contracts, into their management processes, and into their mission statements. The challenge is to be a light, not a judge; to be a model, not a critic.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Principle-centered leadership is practiced from the inside out on four levels: 1) personal (my relationship with myself); 2) interpersonal (my relationships and interactions with others); 3) managerial (my responsibility to get a job done with others); and 4) organizational (my need to organize people—to recruit them, train them, compensate them, build teams, solve problems, and create aligned structure, strategy, and systems). Each level is “necessary but insufficient,” meaning”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“To value oneself and, at the same time, subordinate oneself to higher purposes and principles is the paradoxical essence of highest humanity and the foundation of effective leadership.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Our values often reflect the beliefs of our cultural background. From childhood we develop a value system that represents a combination of cultural influences, personal discoveries, and family scripts. These become the “glasses” through which we look at the world. We evaluate, assign priorities, judge, and behave based on how we see life through these glasses”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Centering on principles provides sufficient security to not be threatened by change, comparisons, or criticisms; guidance to discover our mission, define our roles, and write our scripts and goals; wisdom to learn from our mistakes and seek continuous improvement; and power to communicate and cooperate, even under conditions of stress and fatigue”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“self-initiated and feeds upon itself. You will develop your abilities faster by learning to make and keep promises or commitments. Start by making a small promise to yourself; continue fulfilling that promise until you have a sense that you have a little more control over yourself. Now take the next level of challenge.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership
“Likewise, until we drop unwarranted assumptions about people, we can’t expect to bring about lasting improvements in our organizations: we can’t magnify our human resources using manipulative management techniques any more than we can repair Humpty Dumpty with more horses and more men. Nevertheless, in this topsy-turvy world, matters often get turned around. We confuse efficiency with effectiveness, expediency with priority, imitation with innovation, cosmetics with character, or pretense with competence.”
Stephen R. Covey, Principle-Centered Leadership

« previous 1