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3001: The Final Odyssey (Space Odyssey, #4) 3001: The Final Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
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“My favourite definition of an intellectual: 'Someone who has been educated beyond his/her intelligence.

[Sources and Acknowledgements: Chapter 19]”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Never attribute to malevolence what is merely due to incompetence”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Excessive interest in pathological behavior was itself pathological”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Imagine that you're an intelligent extraterrestrial, concerned only with verifiable truths. You discover a species that has divided itself into thousands - no, by now millions - of tribal groups holding an incredible variety of beliefs about the origin of the universe and the way to behave in it. Although many of them have ideas in common, even when there's 99% overlap, the remaining one percent's enough to set them killing and torturing each other, over trivial points of doctrine, utterly meaningless to outsiders. "How to account for such irrational behavior? (...) religion was the by-product of fear - a reaction to a mysterious and often hostile universe. For much of human prehistory, it may have been a necessary evil - but why was it so much more evil than necessary - and why did it survive when it was no longer necessary?”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Perhaps it is better to be un-sane and happy, than sane and un-happy. But it is the best of all to be sane and happy. Whether our descendants can achieve that goal will be the greatest challenge of the future. Indeed, it may well decide whether we have any future.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Finally, I would like to assure my many Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish, and Muslim friends that I am sincerely happy that the religion which Chance has given you has contributed to your peace of mind (and often, as Western medical science now reluctantly admits, to your physical well-being). Perhaps it is better to be un-sane and happy, than sane and un-happy. But it is the best of all to be sane and happy. Whether our descendants can achieve that goal will be the greatest challenge of the future. Indeed, it may well decide whether we have any future.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Atheism is unprovable, so uninteresting. However unlikely it is, we can never be certain that God once existed—and has now shot off to infinity, where no one can ever find him… Like Gautama Buddha, I take no position on this subject.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Imagine that you’re an intelligent extraterrestrial, concerned only with verifiable truths. You discover a species that has divided itself into thousands—no, by now millions—of tribal groups holding an incredible variety of beliefs about the origin of the universe and the way to behave in it. Although many of them have ideas in common, even when there’s a ninety-nine percent overlap, the remaining one percent’s enough to set them killing and torturing each other, over trivial points of doctrine, utterly meaningless to outsiders. “How to account for such irrational behavior?”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Civilization and Religion are incompatible” and “Faith is believing what you know isn’t true.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“there’s something fundamentally wrong with the wiring of our brains, which makes us incapable of consistent logical thinking. To make matters worse, though all creatures need a certain amount of aggressiveness to survive, we seem to have far more than is absolutely necessary. And no other animal tortures its fellows as we do. Is this an evolutionary accident—a piece of genetic bad luck?”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“The trouble with cliché's, some philosopher remarked, probably with a yawn, is that they are so boringly true. But "love at first sight" is never boring.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“there’s something fundamentally wrong with the wiring of our brains, which makes us incapable of consistent logical thinking. To make matters worse, though all creatures need a certain amount of aggressiveness to survive, we seem to have far more than is absolutely necessary. And no other animal tortures its fellows as we do.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“How I envy them,” said Colonel Jones. “Sometimes it’s quite a relief to have something trivial to worry about.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Manual control, please.”

“Are you sure, Frank?”

“Quite sure, 'Falcon' ... Thank you.”

Illogical though it seemed, most of the human race had found it impossible not to be polite to its artificial children, however simpleminded they might be. Whole volumes of psychology, as well as popular guides ('How Not to Hurt Your Computer's Feelings'; 'Artificial Intelligence -- Real Irritation' were some of the best-known titles) had been written on the subject of Man-Machine etiquette. Long ago it had been decided that, however inconsequential rudeness to robots might appear to be, it should be discouraged. All too easily, it could spread to human relationships as well.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“I’ve just had an amusing flashback. All these creatures going in the same direction—they look like the commuters who used to surge back and forth twice a day between home and office, before electronics made it unnecessary.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Never attribute to malevolence what is merely due to incompetence.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“like all material things, they were not immune to the corruptions of Time and its patient, unsleeping servant, Entropy.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Finally, I would like to assure my many Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish, and Muslim friends that I am sincerely happy that the religion which Chance has given you has contributed to your peace of mind (and often, as Western medical science now reluctantly admits, to your physical well-being). Perhaps it is better to be un-sane and happy, than sane and un-happy. But it is best of all to be sane and happy.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“throbbed into silence… “And that’s the way it was—goodbye, wonderful and terrible Twentieth”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“They found it hard to imagine the smog-choked cities of the Twentieth Century, and the waste, greed, and appalling environmental disasters of the Oil Age.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“One sample is poor statistics, my math prof used to say.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Reliability depended on redundancy and automatic checking, and human intervention was much more likely to do harm than good.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Miss Pringle was not much larger than the handheld personal assistants of his own age, and usually lived, like the Old West’s Colt 45, in a quick-draw holster at his waist.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Long ago it had been decided that, however inconsequential rudeness to robots might appear to be, it should be discouraged. All too easily, it could spread to human relationships as well.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“We’re particularly anxious to get our hands on Pioneer 10—the first man-made object to escape from the Solar System.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Do you believe in ghosts, Dim?” “Certainly not: but like every sensible man, I’m afraid of them. Why do you ask?”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“Often we had no choice: we couldn’t reform the whole world. And didn’t somebody once say ‘Politics is the art of the possible’?” “Quite true—which is why only second-rate minds go into it. Genius likes to challenge the impossible.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“The Dean’s complaining to his Faculty. “Why do you scientists need such expensive equipment? Why can’t you be like the Math Department, which only needs a blackboard and a wastepaper basket? Better still, like the Department of Philosophy. That doesn’t even need a wastepaper basket…”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“President of the Society for Creative Anachronisms.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey
“I am the biggest anachronism on Planet Earth.”
Arthur C. Clarke, 3001: The Final Odyssey

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