Following the Equator Quotes

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Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World by Mark Twain
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Following the Equator Quotes Showing 1-22 of 22
“Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn't.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“In the first place God made idiots. This was for practice. Then he made school boards.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“Be good and you will be lonesome.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“He had had much experience of physicians, and said 'the only way to keep your health is to eat what you don't want, drink what you don't like, and do what you'd druther not'.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“The joy of killing! the joy of seeing killing done - these are traits of the human race at large.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“Names are not always what they seem.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
tags: names
“The Whites always mean well when they take human fish out of the ocean and try to make them dry and warm and happy and comfortable in a chicken coop; but the kindest-hearted white man can always be depended on to prove himself inadequate when he deals with savages. He cannot turn the situation around and imagine how he would like it to have a well-meaning savage transfer him from his house and his church and his clothes and his books and his choice food to a hideous wilderness of sand and rocks and snow, and ice and sleet and storm and blistering sun, with no shelter, no bed, no covering for his and his family's naked bodies, and nothing to eat but snakes and grubs and offal. This would be a hell to him; and if he had any wisdom he would know that his own civilization is a hell to the savage - but he hasn't any, and has never had any; and for lack of it he shut up those poor natives in the unimaginable perdition of his civilization, committing his crime with the very best intentions, and saw those poor creatures waste away under his tortures; and gazed at it, vaguely troubled and sorrowful, and wondered what could be the matter with them.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“Truth is the most valuable thing we have. Let us economize it.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“I find that, as a rule, when a thing is a wonder to us it is not because of what we see in it, but because of what others have seen in it. We get almost all our wonders at second hand.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“It is ingeniously named, for it looks just as a cross would look if it looked like something else.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator
“These descriptions do really state the truth- as nearly as the limitations of language will allow. But language is a treacherous thing, a most unsure vehicle, and it can seldom arrange descriptive words in such a way that they will not inflate the facts-by help of the readers imagination, which is always ready to take a hand, and work for nothing, and do the bulk of it at that.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“It is easy to make plans in this world; even a cat can do it; and when one is out in those remote oceans it is noticeable that a cat's plans and a man's are worth about the same.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“We have reached a little altitude where we may look down upon the Indian Thugs with a complacent shudder; and we may even hope for a day, many centuries hence, when our posterity will look down upon us in the same way.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“There is no such thing as "the Queen's English." The property has gone into the hands of a joint stock company and we own the bulk of the shares!”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator
“Australasian's custom of speaking of England as "home." It was always pretty to hear it, and often it was said in an unconsciously caressing way that made it touching; in a way which transmuted a sentiment into an embodiment, and made one seem to see Australasia as a young girl stroking mother England's old gray head.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator
“We all know about Father Damien, the French priest who voluntarily forsook the world and went to the leper island of Molokai to labor among its population of sorrowful exiles who wait there, in slow-consuming misery, for death to come and release them from their troubles;”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator
“One is often surprised at the juvenilities which grown people indulge in at sea, and the interest they take in them, and the consuming enjoyment they get out of them.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator
“There are many humorous things in the world; among them the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.—[See”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator
“The average human being is a perverse creature; and when he isn't that, he is a practical joker.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator
“...and they come without any inherited prejudices in favor of hoary ignorances made sacred by long descent.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World
“to make a pledge of any kind is to declare war against nature; for a pledge is a chain that is always clanking and reminding the wearer of it that he is not a free man.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World by Mark Twain + Illustrated + Unabridged