Twilight of the Idols Quotes

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Twilight of the Idols Twilight of the Idols by Friedrich Nietzsche
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Twilight of the Idols Quotes Showing 61-90 of 90
“L’homme cherche un principe au nom duquel il puisse mépriser l’homme ; il invente un autre monde pour pouvoir calomnier et salir ce monde-ci ; en fait, il ne saisit jamais que le néant et fait de ce néant un « Dieu », une « vérité » appelés à juger et à condamner cette existence-ci.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Le Crépuscule des idoles Ou Comment on philosophe avec un marteau
“Judgements, judgements of value concening life, for it or against it, can, in the end, never be true: they have value only as symptoms, they are worthy of consideration only as symptoms; in themselves such judgments are stupidities”
Friedrich Nietzsche, The Twilight of the Idols
“the overall aspect of life is not a state of need and hunger, but instead, wealth, bounty, even absurd squandering—where there is struggle, it is a struggle for power… One should not confuse Malthus with nature.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“And everywhere an indecent haste prevails, as though something would be missed if the young man of 23 were not 'finished', did not yet know the answer to the 'main question': which occupation? - A higher kind of man, if I may be forgiven for saying so, does not like 'occupations', precisely because he knows he has a calling... He has time, he takes his time, he does not even think of getting 'finished' - at thirty you are, in the sense of high culture, a beginner, a child.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“¿Quiere esto decir que todos esos grandes sabios no sólo han sido decadentes, sino que ni siquiera han sido sabios?”
Friedrich Nietzsche, El ocaso de los ídolos o cómo se filosofa a martillazos
“To die proudly when it is not possible to live proudly anymore. Death, chosen of one's own free will, death at the the right time, with brightness and cheer, done in the midst of children and witnesses, so that it is still really possible to take one's leave, when the one taking leave IS STILL THERE, with a real assessment of what one has achieved and willed, a Summation of life — all the opposite of the pitiful and appalling comedy that Christianity has made of the hour of death.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Thucydides and, maybe, Machiavelli’s prince are most closely related to me by their unconditional will to fabricate nothing and to see reason in reality—not in “reason,” and still less in “morality” . . .”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Hasta el más valiente de nosotros pocas veces tiene valor para enfrentarse con lo que realmente sabe...”
Friedrich Nietzsche, El ocaso de los ídolos o cómo se filosofa a martillazos
“there are no moral facts at all.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Những chủng loại không tiến hoá. Trái lại, những mẫu suy đồi, bệnh hoạn chế ngự dần những mẫu chọn lọc lành mạnh: những kẻ yếu càng ngày càng thắng lướt những kẻ mạnh - bởi chúng đông hơn, khôn khéo hơn, thận trọng hơn, yếm trá hơn, tự chủ mạnh mẽ hơn, bắt chước tài tình hơn, đức độ hơn - tóm lại bởi chúng tinh thần hơn.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“The disappointed man speaks.—I sought great human beings, I never found anything but the apes of their ideal.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Boldness is as natural an attribute of thought as thought is a natural attribute of freedom. . . . Man would still prefer to will Nothingness than not to will.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“What? You search? You would multiply yourself by ten, by a hundred? You seek followers? Seek zeros!”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“My conception of freedom. — The value of a thing sometimes does not lie in that which one attains by it, but in what one pays for it — what it costs us. I shall give an example. Liberal institutions cease to be liberal as soon as they are attained: later on, there are no worse and no more thorough injurers of freedom than liberal institutions. Their effects are known well enough: they undermine the will to power; they level mountain and valley, and call that morality; they make men small, cowardly, and hedonistic — every time it is the herd animal that triumphs with them. Liberalism: in other words, herd-animalization.

These same institutions produce quite different effects while they are still being fought for; then they really promote freedom in a powerful way. On closer inspection it is war that produces these effects, the war for liberal institutions, which, as a war, permits illiberal instincts to continue. And war educates for freedom. For what is freedom? That one has the will to assume responsibility for oneself. That one maintains the distance which separates us. That one becomes more indifferent to difficulties, hardships, privation, even to life itself. That one is prepared to sacrifice human beings for one's cause, not excluding oneself. Freedom means that the manly instincts which delight in war and victory dominate over other instincts, for example, over those of "pleasure." The human being who has become free — and how much more the spirit who has become free — spits on the contemptible type of well-being dreamed of by shopkeepers, Christians, cows, females, Englishmen, and other democrats. The free man is a warrior.

How is freedom measured in individuals and peoples? According to the resistance which must be overcome, according to the exertion required, to remain on top. The highest type of free men should be sought where the highest resistance is constantly overcome: five steps from tyranny, close to the threshold of the danger of servitude. This is true psychologically if by "tyrants" are meant inexorable and fearful instincts that provoke the maximum of authority and discipline against themselves; most beautiful type: Julius Caesar. This is true politically too; one need only go through history. The peoples who had some value, attained some value, never attained it under liberal institutions: it was great danger that made something of them that merits respect. Danger alone acquaints us with our own resources, our virtues, our armor and weapons, our spirit, and forces us to be strong. First principle: one must need to be strong — otherwise one will never become strong.

Those large hothouses for the strong — for the strongest kind of human being that has so far been known — the aristocratic commonwealths of the type of Rome or Venice, understood freedom exactly in the sense in which I understand it: as something one has or does not have, something one wants, something one conquers.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Chrześcijaństwo jest metafizyką kata.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Mam cię, nihilisto! Siedzenie jest właśnie grzechem przeciw duchowi świętemu. Jeno wychodzone myśli są coś warte.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“En admettant que l’on ait compris ce qu’il y a de sacrilège dans un pareil soulèvement contre la vie, tel qu’il est devenu presque sacro-saint dans la morale chrétienne, on aura, par cela même et heureusement, compris autre chose encore : ce qu’il y a d’inutile, de factice, d’absurde, de mensonger dans un pareil soulèvement. Une condamnation de la vie de la part du vivant n’est finalement que le symptôme d’une espèce de vie déterminée : sans qu’on se demande en aucune façon si c’est à tort ou à raison. Il faudrait prendre position en dehors de la vie et la connaître d’autre part tout aussi bien que quelqu’un qui l’a traversée, que plusieurs et même tous ceux qui y ont passé, pour ne pouvoir que toucher au problème de la valeur de la vie : ce sont là des raisons suffisantes pour comprendre que ce problème est en dehors de notre portée. Si nous parlons de la valeur, nous parlons sous l’inspiration, sous l’optique de la vie : la vie elle-même nous force à déterminer des valeurs, la vie elle-même évolue par notre entremise lorsque nous déterminons des valeurs… Il s’ensuit que toute morale contre nature qui considère Dieu comme l’idée contraire, comme la condamnation de la vie, n’est en réalité qu’une évaluation de vie, — de quelle vie ? de quelle espèce de vie ? Mais j’ai déjà donné ma réponse : de la vie descendante, affaiblie, fatiguée, condamnée. La morale, telle qu’on l’a entendue jusqu’à maintenant — telle qu’elle a été formulée en dernier lieu par Schopenhauer, comme « négation de la volonté de vivre » — cette morale est l’instinct de décadence même, qui se transforme en impératif : elle dit : « va à ta perte ! » — elle est le jugement de ceux qui sont déjà jugés…”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Une condamnation de la vie de la part du vivant n’est finalement que le symptôme d’une espèce de vie déterminée : sans qu’on se demande en aucune façon si c’est à tort ou à raison. Il faudrait prendre position en dehors de la vie et la connaître d’autre part tout aussi bien que quelqu’un qui l’a traversée, que plusieurs et même tous ceux qui y ont passé, pour ne pouvoir que toucher au problème de la valeur de la vie : ce sont là des raisons suffisantes pour comprendre que ce problème est en dehors de notre portée. Si nous parlons de la valeur, nous parlons sous l’inspiration, sous l’optique de la vie : la vie elle-même nous force à déterminer des valeurs, la vie elle-même évolue par notre entremise lorsque nous déterminons des valeurs…”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“After an eventful journey - it was even life-threatening because of flooding in Como, which I only reached late at night - I arrived in Turin on the afternoon of the 21st, my proven place, my residence from then on. I took the same apartment that I had in the spring, via Carlo Alberto 6, III, across from the enormous Palazzo Carignano where Vittore Emanuele was born, with a view of the Piazza Carlo Alberto and the hills beyond. I went back to work without delay: only the last quarter of the work was left to be done. Great victory on 30 September; the conclusion of the Revaluation; the leisure of a god walking along the river Po. That same day, I wrote the Preface to Twilight of the Idols: I had corrected the manuscript for it in September, as my recuperation. - I never experienced an autumn like this before, I never thought anything like this could happen on earth, - a Claude Lorrain projected out to infinity, every day having the same tremendous perfection.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Are we immoralists doing harm to virtue?—Just as little as the anarchists are harming the princes. Only since the princes have been shot at have they been sitting securely on their thrones again. Moral: one must take shots at morality.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“moral judgments can never be taken literally: literally, they always contain nothing but nonsense. But they are semiotically invaluable all the same: they reveal, at least to those who are in the know, the most valuable realities of cultures and inner states that did not know enough to “understand” themselves. Morality is just a sign language, just a symptomatology: you already have to know what it’s all about in order to get any use out of it.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Rousseau, esse primeiro homem moderno, idealista e 'canaille' numa só pessoa; que necessitava da 'dignidade' moral para aguentar seu próprio aspecto; doente de vaidade e de autodesprezo desenfreados. Esse aborto que se recostou no umbral da nova época também queria 'retorno à natureza' -- para onde, repito a pergunta, queria retornar Rousseau? -- Eu odeio Rousseau inclusive na Revolução: ela é a expressão histórico-universal dessa duplicidade de idealista e 'canaille'. A 'farce' sangrenta com que transcorreu essa Revolução, a sua 'imoralidade', pouco me importa: o que odeio é a sua moralidade rousseauniana -- as chamadas 'verdades' da Revolução, com as quais ela ainda faz efeito e convence para o seu lado tudo o que é raso e medíocre. A doutrina da igualdade!... Mas não há veneno mais venenoso: pois ela parece pregada pela própria justiça, enquanto é o fim da justiça... 'Aos iguais o que é igual, aos desiguais o que é desigual' -- esse seria o verdadeiro discurso da justiça: e, consequência disso, 'jamais igualar o que é desigual.' O fato de as coisas terem transcorrido de maneira tão medonha e sangrenta em torno dessa doutrina da igualdade conferiu a essa 'ideia moderna' par excellence uma espécie de glória e resplendor, de modo que a Revolução como espetáculo também seduziu os espíritos mais nobres. Isso não é, no fim das contas, razão para estimá-la mais. -- Vejo apenas um homem que a considerou da maneira que ela deve ser considerada, com nojo -- Goethe”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Crepúsculo dos ìdolos: 1
“The Church and morality say, “A race, a people is destroyed by vice and luxury.” My reconstituted reason says: when a people is perishing, physiologically degenerating, the effects of this are vice and luxury (that is, the need for stronger and stronger, more and more frequent stimuli, the kind of stimuli that are familiar to every exhausted nature).”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“at the age of thirty, when it comes to high culture, one is a beginner, a child.—”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“To invent fables about a world "other" than this one has no meaning at all, unless an instinct of slander, detraction, and suspicion against life has gained the upper hand in us: in that case, we avenge ourselves against life with a phantasmagoria of "another," a "better" life.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Humanity does not strive for happiness; only the English do.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Getting along with people, keeping an open house in one’s heart—that’s liberal, but nothing more than liberal. You can recognize hearts that are capable of noble hospitality by their many curtained windows and closed shutters: they keep their best rooms empty. But why?—Because they are waiting for guests that one does not “get along with”…”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Physiologically, everything ugly weakens and saddens man. It reminds him of decay, danger, impotence; it actually deprives him of strength ... Whenever man is depressed at all, he senses the proximity of something 'ugly.' His feeling of power, his will to power, his courage, his pride - all fall with the ugly and rise with the beautiful ... The ugly is understood as a sign and symptom of degeneration: whatever reminds us in the least of degeneration causes in us the judgement of 'ugly.' Every suggestion of exhaustion, of heaviness, of age, of weariness; every kind of lack of freedom, such as cramps, such as paralysis; and above all, the smell, the color, the form of dissolution, of decomposition - even in the ultimate attenuation into a symbol - all evoke the same reaction, the value judgement 'ugly.' A hatred is aroused ... the decline of his type. Here he hates out of the deepest instinct of the species ... it is the deepest hatred there is. It is because of this that art is deep.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Mankind does not strive for happiness; only the Englishman does that.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols
“Evil people don’t have songs.”13—How is it that the Russians have songs?”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols

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