Dear Life Quotes

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Dear Life Dear Life by Alice Munro
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Dear Life Quotes (showing 1-30 of 54)
“The thing is to be happy,' he said. 'No matter what. Just try that. You can. It gets to be easier and easier. It's nothing to do with circumstances. You wouldn't believe how good it is. Accept everything and then tragedy disappears. Or tragedy lightens, anyway, you're just there, going along easy in the world.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“She would live now, not read.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“We say of some things that they can't be forgiven, or that we will never forgive ourselves. But we do--we do it all the time.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“Who can ever say the perfect thing to the poet about his poetry?”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“Things have changed, of course. There are counsellors at the ready. Kindness and understanding. Life is harder for some, we're told. Not their fault, even if the blows are purely imaginary. Felt just as keenly by the recipient, or the non recipient, as the case may be.
But good use can be made of everything, if you are willing.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“The thing is to be happy,” he said. “No matter what. Just try that. You can. It gets to be easier and easier. It’s nothing to do with circumstances. You wouldn’t believe how good it is. Accept everything and then tragedy disappears.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life: Stories
“I just believed it easily, the way you might believe and in fact remember that you once had another set of teeth, now vanished but real in spite of that. Until one day, one day when I may even have been in my teens, I knew with a dim sort of hole in my insides that now I didn't believe it anymore.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“I was not really surprised by what he was saying. A lot of people felt that way. Especially men. There was a quantity of things that men hated. Or had no use for, as they said. And that was exactly right. They had no use for it, so they hated it. Maybe it was the same way I felt about algebra- I doubted very much that I would ever find any use for it. But I didn't go so far as to want it wiped off the face of the earth for that reason.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“What he carried with him, all he carried with him, was a lack, something like a lack of air, of proper behavior in his lungs, a difficulty that he supposed would go on forever.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life: Stories
“He said that we had just had an argument, what more did I want?
It was too polite, I said.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“People have thoughts they’d sooner not have. It happens in life.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life: Stories
“Then there was silence, the air like ice. Brittle-looking birch trees with black marks on their white bark, and some kind of small untidy evergreens rolled up like sleepy bears. The frozen lake not level but mounded along the shore, as if the waves had turned to ice in the act of falling.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“I just believed it easily, the way you might believe and in fact remember that you once had another set of teeth, now vanished but real in spite of that. Until one day, one day when I may even have been in my teens, I knew with a dim sort of hole in my insides that now I didn’t believe it anymore.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life: Stories
“Se suponía que saltar del tren era una cancelación. Levantar el cuerpo, preparar las rodillas para entrar en un bloque de aire distinto. Se va en busca de vacío, y en cambio ¿qué encuentra? La inmediatez de una avalancha de paisajes nuevos que exigen una atención que no pedían cuando ibas en el tren mirando por la ventanilla, sin más. ¿Qué haces aquí? ¿Adónde vas? Una sensación de que te observan cosas de las que no sabías nada. De ser un intruso. De que la vida que te rodea llega a conclusiones sobre ti desde ángulos privilegiados que no puedes ver.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“A million dollars in those days was a million dollars.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life: Stories
“We say of some things that they can't be forgiven, or that we will never forgive ourselves. But we do -- we do it all the time.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“It seemed to me that everybody ended up in Toronto at least for a little while.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“Do you ever think that there used to be more sensible explanations about things than there are now?”
Alice Munro, Dear Life: Stories
“Roly Grain, his name was, and he does not have any further part in what I’m writing now, in spite of his troll’s name, because this is not a story, only life.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
tags: life
“I went on to say that no lies, after all, were as strong as the lies we tell ourselves and then unfortunately have to keep telling to make the whole puke stay down in our stomachs, eating us alive, as he would find out soon enough.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life: Stories
“That was her way. She carried not noticing to an extreme. Not noticing, not intruding, not suggesting.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“The thing is to be happy, he said. No matter what. Just try that. You can. It gets to be easier and easier. It's nothing to do with circumstances. You wouldn't believe how good it is. Accept everything and then tragedy disappears. Or tragedy lightens, anyway, and you're just there, going along easy in the world.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
tags: life
“La cuestión es ser feliz -dijo Neal-. A toda costa. Inténtalo. Se puede. Y luego cada vez resulta más fácil. No tiene nada que ver con las circunstancias. No te imaginas hasta qué punto funciona. Se aceptan las cosas y la tragedia desaparece. O pesa menos, en cualquier caso, y de pronto descubres que estás en paz con el mundo.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“People have thoughts they'd sooner not have. It happens in life.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“So it wasn’t Peggy I was interested in, not her tears, her crumpled looks. She reminded me too much of myself. It was her comforters I marvelled at. How they seemed to bow down and declare themselves in front of her.
What had they been saying? Nothing in particular. All right, they said. It’s all right, Peggy, they said. Now, Peggy. All right. All right.
Such kindness. That anybody could be so kind.
It is true that these young men, brought to our country to train for bombing missions on which so many of them would be killed, might have been speaking in the normal accents of Cornwall or Kent or Hull or Scotland. But to me they seemed unable to open their mouths without uttering some kind of blessing, a blessing on the moment. It didn’t occur to me that their futures were all bound up with disaster, or that their ordinary lives had flown out the window and smashed on the ground. I just thought of the blessing, how wonderful to get on the receiving end of it, how lucky and undeserving was that Peggy.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“Also there were people going round in such clumsy ways, stopping and starting, and hordes of schoolchildren like the ones I used to keep in order. Why so many of them and so idiotic with their yelps and yells and the redundancy, the sheer un-necessity of their existence, Everywhere an insult in your face. As the shops and their signs were an insult, and the noise of the cars with their stops and starts. Everywhere the proclaiming, this is life. As if we needed, more of life.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“She barely notices when I say that I am going on to Toronto to visit my grandparents. Except to remark that they must be really old. Not a word about Alister. Not even a bad word. She would not have forgotten. Just tidied up the scene and put it away in a closet with her former selves. Or maybe she really is a person who can deal recklessly with humiliation.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“The work of poetry that it seemed she had been doing in her head for most of her life.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“If you were writing poetry it was somewhat safer to be a woman than a man.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life
“Something that could not easily bu put into words and indeed might never be.”
Alice Munro, Dear Life

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