Living Proof Quotes

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Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference (Expanded) Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference by John Capecci
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Living Proof Quotes Showing 1-7 of 7
“What does it mean to be an advocate?
In its broadest sense, advocacy means “any public action to support and recommend a cause, policy or practice.” That covers a lot of public actions, from displaying
 a bumper sticker to sounding off with a bullhorn. But whether the action is slapping something on the back of a car or speaking in front of millions, every act of advocacy involves making some kind of public statement, one that says, “I support this.” Advocacy is a communicative act. Advocacy is also a persuasive act. “I support this” is usually followed by another statement (sometimes only implied): “...and you should, too.” Advocacy not only means endorsing a cause or idea, but recommending, promoting, defending, or arguing for it.”
John Capecci and Timothy Cage, Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference
“The power of your story may not lie in its drama, but in its absolutely perfect relationship to your cause.”
John Capecci and Timothy Cage, Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference
“Advocating well with a personal story is not a call to simply “Insert Story Here.”
John Capecci and Timothy Cage, Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference
“The space between the private and the public is the nexus of the personal and the social, if not political. It’s where we meet the strong or subtle cultural censors who attempt to define what community, race, class, or gender can or cannot speak, to tell us which stories are told and valued and which are not. In short, it’s where we’re reminded of the power of personal stories and the power of the storyteller.”
John Capecci and Timothy Cage, Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference
“You may have come to advocacy on your own, it may be part of your job or you may have been asked to “put a face” on a campaign by serving as its spokesperson. You may be acting as a lone crusader or as part of a larger advocacy effort. Either way, you share an objective with all other advocates: to have your story move audiences from apathy to empathy to action.”
John Capecci and Timothy Cage, Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference
“A recent survey of Top Five Fears places public speaking alongside “identity theft” and “mass shootings.” In the 1980s, it completed with “nuclear destruction.” In the 1970s, “shark attack.”
John Capecci and Timothy Cage, Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference
“You don’t need to be a poet, a performer, a writer, or a journalist to tell your story powerfully. You do, however, need to elevate your language in ways that will bring your story to life clearly and imaginatively for others.”
John Capecci and Timothy Cage, Living Proof: Telling Your Story to Make a Difference