The Celtic Twilight Quotes

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The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore by W.B. Yeats
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The Celtic Twilight Quotes (showing 1-27 of 27)
“We can make our minds so like still water that beings gather about us that they may see, it may be, their own images, and so live for a moment with a clearer, perhaps even with a fiercer life because of our quiet.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“One loses, as one grows older, something of the lightness of one's dreams; one begins to take life up in both hands, and to care more for the fruit than the flower, and that is no great loss perhaps.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“What is literature but the expression of moods by the vehicle of symbol and incident? And are there not moods which need heaven, hell, purgatory, and faeryland for their expression, no less than this dilapidated earth? Nay, are there not moods which shall find no expression unless there be men who dare to mix heaven, hell, purgatory, and faeryland together, or even to set the heads of beasts to the bodies of men, or to thrust the souls of men into the heart of rocks? Let us go forth, the tellers of tales, and seize whatever prey the heart long for, and have no fear. Everything exists, everything is true, and the earth is only a little dust under our feet."

(A Teller of Tales)”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“In the great cities we see so little of the world, we drift into our minority. In the little towns and villages there are no minorities; people are not numerous enough. You must see the world there, perforce. Every man is himself a class; every hour carries its new challenge. When you pass the inn at the end of the village you leave your favourite whimsy behind you; for you will meet no one who can share it. We listen to eloquent speaking, read books and write them, settle all the affairs of the universe. The dumb village multitudes pass on unchanging; the feel of the spade in the hand is no different for all our talk: good seasons and bad follow each other as of old. The dumb multitudes are no more concerned with us than is the old horse peering through the rusty gate of the village pound. The ancient map-makers wrote across unexplored regions, 'Here are lions.' Across the villages of fishermen and turners of the earth, so different are these from us, we can write but one line that is certain, 'Here are ghosts.' ("Village Ghosts")”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“I have desired, like every artist, to create a little world out of the beautiful, pleasant, and significant things of this marred and clumsy world, and to show in a vision something of the face of Ireland to any of my own people who would look where I bid them. I have therefore
written down accurately and candidly much that I have heard and seen,
and, except by way of commentary, nothing that I have merely imagined.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“Time drops in decay
Like a candle burnt out.
And the mountains and woods
Have their day, have their day;
But, kindly old rout
Of the fire-born moods,
You pass not away.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“There are some doubters even in the western villages. One woman told me last Christmas that she did not believe either in hell or in ghosts. Hell she thought was merely an invention got up by the priest to keep people good; and ghosts would not be permitted, she held, to go 'trapsin about the earth' at their own free will; 'but there are faeries,' she added, 'and little leprechauns, and water-horses, and fallen angels.' I have met also a man with a mohawk Indian tattooed upon his arm, who held exactly similar beliefs and unbeliefs. No matter what one doubts one never doubts the faeries, for, as the man with the mohawk Indian on his arm said to me, 'they stand to reason.' Even the official mind does not escape this faith. ("Reason and Unreason")”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“Let us go forth, the tellers of tales, and seize whatever prey the heart long for, and have no fear.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“He had many strange sights to keep him cheerful or to make him sad. I asked him had he ever seen the faeries, and got the reply, 'Am I not annoyed with them?' I asked too if he had ever seen the banshee. 'I have seen it,' he said, 'down there by the water, batting the river with its hands.' ("A Teller of Tales")”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“....tradition gives the one thing many shapes.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“By the Hospital Lane goes the 'Faeries Path.' Every evening they travel from the hill to the sea, from the sea to the hill. At the sea end of their path stands a cottage. One night Mrs. Arbunathy, who lived there, left her door open, as she was expecting her son. Her husband was asleep by the fire; a tall man came in and sat beside him. After he had been sitting there for a while, the woman said, 'In the name of God, who are you?' He got up and went out, saying, 'Never leave the door open at this hour, or evil may come to you.' She woke her husband and told him. 'One of the good people has been with us,' said he. ("Village Ghosts")”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“Everything exists, everything is true, and the earth is only a little dust under our feet.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“Even when I was a boy I could never walk in a wood without feeling that at any moment I might find before me somebody or something I had long looked for without knowing what I looked for. And now I will at times explore every little nook of some poor coppice with almost anxious footsteps, so deep a hold has this imagination upon me. You too meet with a like imagination, doubtless, somewhere, wherever your ruling stars will have it, Saturn driving you to the woods, or the Moon, it may be, to the edges of the sea. I will not of a certainty believe that there is nothing in the sunset, where our forefathers imagined the dead following their shepherd the sun, or nothing but some vague presence as little moving as nothing. If beauty is not a gateway out of the net we were taken in at our birth, it will not long be beauty, and we will find it better to sit at home by the fire and fatten a lazy body or to run hither and thither in some foolish sport than to look at the finest show that light and shadow ever made among green leaves. I say to myself, when I am well out of that thicket of argument, that they are surely there, the divine people, for only we who have neither simplicity nor wisdom have denied them, and the simple of all times and the wise men of ancient times have seen them and even spoken to them.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“I will make rigid my roots and branches. It is not now my turn to burst into leaves and flowers.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“Never leave the door open at this hour, or evil may come to you.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“Every man is himself a class; every hour carries its new challenge.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“Nay, are there not moods which shall find no expression unless there be men who dare to mix heaven, hell, purgatory, and faeryland together, or even to set the heads of beasts to the bodies of men, or to thrust the souls of men into the heart of rocks?”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“Everything exists, everything is true, and the earth is only a little dust under our feet. BELIEF”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“What is literature but the expression of moods by the vehicle of symbol and incident?”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“And yet the wise are of opinion that wherever man is, the dark powers who would feed his rapacities are there too, no less than the bright beings who store their honey in the cells of his heart, and the twilight beings who flit hither and thither, and that they encompass him with a passionate and melancholy multitude.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore
“When all is said and done, how do we not know but that our own unreason may be better than another’s truth? for it has been warmed on our hearths and in our souls, and is ready for the wild bees of truth to hive in it, and make their sweet honey. Come into the world again, wild bees, wild bees!”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“better doubtless to believe much unreason and a little truth than to deny for denial's sake truth and unreason alike,”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“The first time I saw him he was cooking mushrooms for himself; the next time he was asleep under a hedge, smiling in his sleep. He was indeed always cheerful, though I thought I could see in his eyes (swift as the eyes of a rabbit, when they peered out of their wrinkled holes) a melancholy which was well-nigh a portion of their joy; the visionary melancholy of purely instinctive natures and of all animals.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“Let us go forth, the tellers of tales, and seize whatever prey the heart long for, and have no fear. Everything exists, everything is true, and the earth is only a little dust under our feet. BELIEF”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“He was a great teller of tales, and unlike our common romancers, knew how to empty heaven, hell, and purgatory, faeryland and earth, to people his stories.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“Let us go forth, the tellers of tales, and seize whatever prey the heart long for, and have no fear. Everything exists, everything is true, and the earth is only a little dust under our feet. BELIEF AND UNBELIEF There are some doubters even in the western villages.”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight
“When all is said and done, how do we not know but that our own unreason may be better than another's truth? for it has been warmed in our hearths and in our souls, and is ready for the wild bees of truth to have in it and make their sweet honey. Come into the world again, wild bees, wild bees!”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore