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Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change by Pema Chödrön
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Living Beautifully Quotes (showing 1-27 of 27)
“When we resist change, it’s called suffering. But when we can completely let go and not struggle against it, when we can embrace the groundlessness of our situation and relax into it’s dynamic quality, that’s called enlightenment”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“We have a choice. We can spend our whole life suffering because we can't relax with how things really are, or we can relax and embrace the open-endedness of the human situation, which is fresh, unfixated, unbiased.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“If your mind is expansive and unfettered, you will find yourself in a more accommodating world, a place that's endlessly interesting and alive. That quality isn't inherent in the place but in your state of mind.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“But as we let go of our repetitive stories and fixed ideas about ourselves--particularly deep-seated feelings of "I'm not okay"--the armor starts to fall apart, and we open into the spaciousness of our true nature, into who we really are beyond the transitory thoughts and emotions. We see that our armor is made up of nothing more than habits and fears, and we begin to feel that we can let those go.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“Awakening is not a process of building ourselves up but a process of letting go. It’s a process of relaxing in the middle—the paradoxical, ambiguous middle, full of potential, full of new ways of thinking and seeing—with absolutely no money-back guarantee of what will happen next.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“The everyday practice is simply to develop a complete acceptance and openness to all situations and emotions, and to all people, experiencing everything totally without mental reservations and blockages, so that one never withdraws or centralizes into oneself.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“Once we have the fixed idea “this is me,” then we see everything as a threat or a promise—or something we couldn’t care less about.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“Leonard Cohen once said about the benefits of many years of meditation, “The less there was of me, the happier I got.” Letting”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“our tendencies with their habitual story lines are described as seeds in the unconscious. When the right causes and conditions come together, these preexisting propensities pop up like flowers in the springtime. It’s helpful to contemplate that it’s these propensities and not what triggers them that are the real cause of our suffering.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“When we resist change, it’s called suffering. But when we can completely let go and not struggle against it, when we can embrace the groundlessness of our situation and relax into its dynamic quality, that’s called enlightenment, or awakening to our true nature, to our fundamental goodness. Another word for this is freedom—freedom from struggling against the fundamental ambiguity of being human.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“The root of these fundamentalist tendencies, these dogmatic tendencies, is a fixed identity—a fixed view we have of ourselves as good or bad, worthy or unworthy, this or that. With a fixed identity, we have to busy ourselves with trying to rearrange reality, because reality doesn’t always conform to our view.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“But we don’t have to close down when we feel groundlessness in any form. Instead, we can turn toward it and say, “This is what freedom from fixed mind feels like. This is what freedom from closed-heartedness feels like. This is what unbiased, unfettered goodness feels like. Maybe I’ll get curious and see if I can go beyond my resistance and experience the goodness.” Buddhism holds”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“there’s more to liberation than trying to avoid discomfort, more to lasting happiness than pursuing temporary pleasures, temporary relief.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“indignation,”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“Vivir es una forma de no estar seguro, de no saber lo que vendrá después ni en qué forma. En el momento en que sepamos cómo, empezaremos a morir un poco. Los artistas nunca sabemos nada del todo. Suponemos. Podemos estar equivocados, pero aun así nos lanzamos de un salto a la oscuridad una y otra vez. AGNES DE MILLE”
Pema Chödrön, Vivir bellamente: en la incertidumbre y el cambio
“Taking the . . . vow to help others implies that instead of holding our own individual territory and defending it tooth and nail, we become open to the world that we are living in. It means we are willing to take on greater responsibility, immense responsibility. In fact, it means taking a big chance. —CHÖGYAM TRUNGPA RINPOCHE”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“La vida es como subirse a un barco que está a punto de zarpar y hundirse en el océano. SHUNRYU SUZUKI ROSHI”
Pema Chödrön, Vivir bellamente: en la incertidumbre y el cambio
“Life is like stepping into a boat that is about to sail out to sea and sink. —SHUNRYU SUZUKI ROSHI A”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“This has been going on through the ages. They criticize the silent ones. They criticize the talkative ones. They criticize the moderate ones. There is no one in the world that escapes criticism. There never was and never will be, nor is there now, the wholly criticized or the wholly approved. Shakyamuni Buddha said that more than twenty-five hundred years ago, but it seems that some things never change.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“It’s not impermanence per se, or even knowing we’re going to die, that is the cause of our suffering, the Buddha taught. Rather, it’s our resistance to the fundamental uncertainty of our situation. Our discomfort arises from all of our efforts to put ground under our feet, to realize our dream of constant okayness. When we resist change, it’s called suffering. But when we can completely let go and not struggle against it, when we can embrace the groundlessness of our situation and relax into its dynamic quality, that’s called enlightenment, or awakening to our true nature, to our fundamental goodness. Another word for that is freedom—freedom from struggling against the fundamental ambiguity of being human.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“But if, instead of thinking of these feelings as bad, we could think of them as road signs or barometers that tell us we’re in touch with groundlessness, then we would see the feelings for what they really are: the gateway to liberation, an open doorway to freedom from suffering, the path to our deepest well-being and joy.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“We’re all in this together, all so interconnected that we can’t awaken without one another. We”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“When you come from the view that you’re fundamentally good rather than fundamentally flawed, as you see yourself speak or act out, as you see yourself repress, you will have a growing understanding that you’re not a bad person who needs to shape up but a good person with temporary, malleable habits that are causing you a lot of suffering. And then, in that spirit, you can become very familiar with these temporary but strongly embedded habits.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“What a predicament! We seem doomed to suffer simply because we have a deep-seated fear of how things really are. Our attempts to find lasting pleasure, lasting security, are at odds with the fact that we’re part of a dynamic system in which everything and everyone is in process.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“Not long ago, I read an interview with the war correspondent Chris Hedges in which he used a phrase that seemed like a perfect description of our situation: “the moral ambiguity of human existence.” This refers, I think, to an essential choice that confronts us all: whether to cling to the false security of our fixed ideas and tribal views, even though they bring us only momentary satisfaction, or to overcome our fear and make the leap to living an authentic life. That phrase, “the moral ambiguity of human existence,” resonated strongly with me because it’s what I’ve been exploring for years: How can we relax and have a genuine, passionate relationship with the fundamental uncertainty, the groundlessness of being human?”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“The discomfort associated with groundlessness, with the fundamental ambiguity of being human, comes from our attachment to wanting things to be a certain way. The Tibetan word for attachment is shenpa. My teacher Dzigar Kongtrül calls shenpa the barometer of ego clinging, a gauge of our self-involvement and self-importance. Shenpa has a visceral quality associated with grasping or, conversely, pushing away. This is the feeling of I like, I want, I need and I don’t like, I don’t want, I don’t need, I want it to go away. I think of shenpa as being hooked. It’s that stuck feeling, that tightening or closing down or withdrawing we experience when we’re uncomfortable with what’s going on. Shenpa is also the urge to find relief from those feelings by clinging to something that gives us pleasure.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“Everything in you will want to do the habitual thing, will want to pursue the story line. The story line is associated with certainty and comfort. It bolsters your very limited, static sense of self and holds out the promise of safety and happiness. But the promise is a false one; any happiness it brings is only temporary. The more you practice not escaping into the fantasy world of your thoughts and instead contacting the felt sense of groundlessness, the more accustomed you’ll become to experiencing emotions as simply sensation—free of concept, free of story line, free of fixed ideas of bad and good.”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change