Happy City Quotes

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Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design by Charles Montgomery
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Happy City Quotes Showing 1-30 of 99
“The city is not merely a repository of pleasures. It is the stage on which we fight our battles, where we act out the drama of our own lives. It can enhance or corrode our ability to cope with everyday challenges. It can steal our autonomy or give us the freedom to thrive. It can offer a navigable environment, or it can create a series of impossible gauntlets that wear us down daily. The messages encoded in architecture and systems can foster a sense of mastery or helplessness.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“listen to the parts of ourselves that are more inclined toward curiosity, trust, and cooperation.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“having one friend or family member to confide in had the same effect on life satisfaction as a tripling of income.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“Happiness is a house with many rooms, but at its core is a hearth around which we gather with family, friends, the community, and sometimes even strangers to find the best part of ourselves.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“You are important—not because you’re rich, but because you are human.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“Here’s an image that sticks: imagine a loaded Boeing 747 crashing every three days, killing everyone aboard. That’s how many people die on U.S. highways every year.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“everything remains inherently connected to everything else.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“We were born to move—not merely to be transported,”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“Partly because sprawl has forced Americans to drive farther and farther in the course of every day, per capita road death rates in the United States hover around forty thousand per year. That’s a third more people than are killed by guns. It’s more than ten times the number of people killed in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“People who live in monofunctional, car-dependent neighborhoods outside of urban centers are much less trusting of other people than people who live in walkable neighborhoods where housing is mixed with shops, services, and places to work.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“sociologist Erving Goffman suggested that life is a series of performances in which we are all continually managing the impression we give other people.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“There is no single answer to any problem in the city. The solution comes from a multiplicity of answers.’”*”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“Aside from the financial burden, people who endure long drives tend to experience higher blood pressure and more headaches than those with short commutes. They get frustrated more easily and tend to be grumpier when they get to their destination.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“Enrique Peñalosa with a big and simple idea: that urban design should be used to make people happier.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“Scant few neighborhoods in North America feature places that draw people together regularly for anything other than buying stuff.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“As much as we complain about other people, there is nothing worse for mental health than a social desert. A study of Swiss cities found that psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia, are most common in neighborhoods with the thinnest social networks. Social isolation just may be the greatest environmental hazard of city living—worse than noise, pollution, or even crowding. The more connected we are with family and community, the less likely we are to experience colds, heart attacks, strokes, cancer, and depression. Simple friendships with other people in one’s neighborhood are some of the best salves for stress during hard economic times—in fact, sociologists have found that when adults keep these friendships, their kids are better insulated from the effects of their parents’ stress. Connected people sleep better at night. They are more able to tackle adversity. They live longer. They consistently report being happier.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“The sad part is that a place’s popularity can actually destroy the elements that contribute to happiness. The more we flock to high-status cities for the good life—money, opportunity, novelty—the more crowded, expensive, polluted, and congested those places become. The result? Surveys show that rich, high-status states in the United States are among the least happy in the country.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“The conclusion: killer drivers are so common in sprawl that the carnage they create far exceeds the damage done by killers who use other weapons. In fact, someone who walks out her door on the edges of sprawl suburbia is much more likely to die at the hands of a stranger than someone moving through most American central cities or inner suburbs. The only difference is that most of suburbia’s killers didn’t mean it.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“Globally, traffic injuries are the greatest killer of ten- to twenty-four-year-olds.* A rational actor would be terrified of suburban roads. A rational policy maker would wage war, not on other nations, but on traffic deaths.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“The logical response to these converging crises would be to alter our individual and collective behavior in order to stave off disaster. It demands using less energy and raw materials. It means moving more efficiently and moving shorter distances. It means living closer together and sharing more spaces, walls, and vehicles. It means collecting experiences rather than objects.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“We drive as fast as road designs tell us to drive. The result: drivers kill four times as many pedestrians on spacious suburban residential streets than on the narrow streets of traditional neighborhoods, because those spacious roads make driving faster feel safer. And it is not collisions that kill people, but collisions at high speed.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“The garden was not merely a biophilic intervention. It was a social machine.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“having one friend or family member to confide in had the same effect on life satisfaction as a tripling of income. Economists love to turn relationships into numbers.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“a human on a bicycle is the most efficient traveler among all machines and animals.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“Part of the problem is that sprawl’s wide streets and big lots take up so much space that cities can’t afford to build fire stations close by, so it takes fire trucks longer to reach each blaze.)”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“land zoning that excludes apartments and affordable housing from neighborhoods also constitutes a form of segregation.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“six-story mixed-use building produced more than thirteen times the tax revenue and twelve times the jobs per acre of land than the Walmart on the edge of town.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“living in low-density sprawl puts residents at greater risk of arthritis, chronic lung disease, digestive problems, headaches, and urinary tract infections.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“result from living in communities that force people to drive. Just living in a sprawling city has the effect of four years of aging.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design
“The more TV you watch, the fewer friendships you are likely to have, the less trusting you become, and the less happy you are likely to be.”
Charles Montgomery, Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design

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